Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hi everyone, I’m Gina! Welcome back to FinnishPod101.com. This is Absolute Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 20 - Do You Have Any Finnish Dogs?
Paula: Hei! Minä olen Paula. I’m Paula.
Gina: In this lesson, we’re still talking about having something. But unlike in the previous lesson, the exact number of things you have is not specified, so you’ll learn the partitive plural form.
Paula: This conversation takes place at home. Emmi is asking Helen more questions about how things are back in Australia. They will be speaking in standard Finnish.
Gina: Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: Many countries have their own dog breeds. Are there any special Finnish dogs?
Paula: Oh yes. For example, there’s the Finnish spitz, or ‘suomenpystykorva’ in Finnish. It’s the national dog of Finland, actually. You have this image of a Finnish house in the countryside, and there’s always a Finnish spitz in front of it, guarding the house against any strangers.
Gina: Really? (haha) And what does it look like?
Paula: It’s a rather small dog with golden-red fur, and a tail that curves above its back.
Gina: Do they have a role other than keeping people company?
Paula: Well, in the days when these Finnish dog breeds developed, people didn’t really have the luxury of keeping dogs just for company. They were mostly used as hunting dogs. In Lapland, there were also dogs used for herding reindeer. That’s where the Finnish Lapphund comes from.
Gina: A reindeer-herding dog? That’s interesting. Do you only have them in Lapland?
Paula: No, these days they’re quite popular all over Finland. They’re very social and easy to train.
Gina: Okay. Now let’s have a look at the vocabulary.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Paula: The first word is ‘mitään’. It’s very similar to the word ‘yhtään’ we had in the previous lesson. But they’re not exactly synonymous. If you use ‘yhtään’, you’re only interested in the amount of the thing, but if you use ‘mitään’, you’re recognizing that there could be many kinds of things in question.
Gina: Yeah, it’s a bit difficult to explain, but in this dialogue Emmi asked if Helen had any animals...
Paula: Onko sinulla mitään eläimiä?
Gina: Because she’s not only interested in if Helen actually has animals or not, but also in what kinds of animals she has. In contrast, in the previous lesson she asked if Helen had any brothers or sisters...
Paula: Onko sinulla yhtään veljeä tai siskoa?
Gina: ...because people don’t usually have different kinds of brothers and sisters.
Paula: That’s right. But don’t worry if you mix them up. You’ll be understood anyway. The next word is ‘todella’, or “really”. It emphasizes whatever comes after it. It’s actually originally the adessive form of the word ‘tosi’, or “truth”.
Gina: Okay. Now let’s move on to the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: So, we’re still learning about the ‘Minulla on...’ structure in this lesson?
Paula: That’s right. It’s really used a lot in Finnish, so you’d better get used to it. What we’re adding to it in this lesson, is an unspecified number of something. Gina, what’s the case you use for unspecified amounts or numbers?
Gina: Hmm... The partitive?
Paula: Exactly. So we’ll learn the partitive plural form.
Gina: But we don’t actually have to learn a new ending for the partitive plural, do we? I mean, it’s hard enough to have this many cases, each with their own ending! So we’d rather not double the number of endings because of the plural.
Paula: (laughs) Don’t worry. There’s a plural marker that’s inserted before the case endings, and the case endings stay pretty much the same as in the singular. The nominative plural was an exception.
Gina: Great. So what’s the plural marker?
Paula: It’s simply the vowel ‘-i-’. Sometimes it changes into ‘-j-’ between vowels. Also, the preceding vowel may change, but never mind that now.
Gina: So, what would be the partitive form of “plates”?
Paula: “Plate” is ‘lautanen’, and the consonant stem is ‘lautas-’ so you’ll first add ‘-i-’ to get ‘lautasi-’ and then you add the partitive ending ‘-a’ to get lautasia.
Gina: OK. How about “mugs”?
Paula: Mukeja.
Gina: “Glasses”?
Paula: Laseja.
Gina: “Pies”?
Paula: Piirakoita.
Gina: All right, listeners, it’s your turn. How do you say “I have some blue mugs”?
Paula: Here’s a hint. Start with ‘Minulla on...’ The stem you’ll want for “blue” is ‘sinis-’.
---
Paula: Minulla on sinisiä mukeja.
Gina: Okay. Here’s another one - “I have red fish”.
Paula: Here’s a hint - The stem you’ll want for “red” is ‘punais-’ and the stem for “fish” is ‘kalo-’.
---
Paula: ‘Minulla on punaisia kaloja.’ How did you do? If you’d like to review the partitive endings, please check lesson 4.

Outro

Gina: Okay, that’s going to do it for this lesson. Make sure to check the lesson notes, and we’ll see you next time!
Paula: Hei hei!

49 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Onko sinulla mitään eläimiä?

Do you have any animals?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:15 PM
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Hi Ilsa,


Sorry to hear that you feel frustrated at the moment. Could it help to cut these ending studies into smaller pieces to learn little by little? Just don't give up and have fun studying. ❤️️


Let us know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Ilsa
Friday at 06:55 AM
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At this point I am overwhelmed by all the different endings to words that correspond to various meanings. 😞


I will keep trying to learn. It is difficult for me to make up exercises to practice.

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:55 PM
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Hello Anthony,

Thank you for your postings. You really have a nice try and interesting approach to answer Kent's question. When we are talking about partitive plural, there are many different kinds of rules and also the exceptions which are in need to study properly and unfortunately, this comment section is with its limited space is a bit uncomfortable place for expanded grammar teaching. In this case, I would use a bit simpler way to analyze "piirakka" nominative partitive plural form. It is called a partitive plural long form. Important is the nominative form ending -kka (or -kko). These words have only one k- letter and -oita or -öitä ending.


Let us know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Anthony
Wednesday at 08:32 AM
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I am using a book along the website resources. It's called Finnish: A Comprehensive Grammar, by Fred Karlson. Hope this is helpful!

Anthony
Wednesday at 08:27 AM
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Finally, the last question is 'where the 'ta' comes from? This was mentioned in one of the partitive lessons where, to make a word partitive, you need to add either an -a/-ta/-tta depending on the ending of the word. As the unfinished word 'piirakoi.......' (our product so far) ends with 2 vowels, therefore the corresponding ending would be -ta, hence we get the word 'piirakoita'.

Anthony
Wednesday at 08:26 AM
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The next question is 2) 'why it spells single 'k' instead of double 'kk'?' The basic stem/nominative of 'piirakka', is 'piirakka'. The double 'kk' is something that may undergo consonant gradation under the right circumstances; and this is the right circumstance! Consonant gradation happens when there is an -i- ending between any of the three consonants p, t, k(no matter they are double pp, tt or kk, or single p, t, k) and any ending, in a noun. If a consonant gradation happens to 'kk', it would become a single 'k', which is why kko > ko. Add -i- because we are turning it into a plural partitive. Ourproduct so far is an unfinished word 'piirakoi......'

Anthony
Wednesday at 08:26 AM
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1st: The first question to ask, is 1) 'how it changes from 'kka' to 'ko'. Perhaps it would be easier to think it in this order of change: kka > kko > ko. First, piirakka is a nominal (nominal = all nouns, adjectives, pronouns and numerals) word that ends in a short -a. When a nominal ends in -a, it undergoes unique changes. There are two possible changes. One change (lets call this rule A) is for two syllables word (not relevant to us today), whereas the other one (rule B) is for nouns that have 3 or more syllables, which is what we are having. The rule B states that ''any nouns with 3 or more syllables -a normally changes to -o (yes, I think you just have to learn it...) when -a is preceded by 2 consonants (the double 'kk'). Hence why kka > kko.

Anthony
Wednesday at 08:25 AM
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Hey Kent, I hope you managed to find your answer but if not, I would say I also have the same question and might have found an explanation for this. Please correct me if I get any of the followings wrong. I will break it down in steps and explain how it changes from 'piirakka' + -i (partitive plural ending) + -ta (partitive ending for words that end with 2 vowels; I will explain this later) to 'piirakoita'.

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 12:36 PM
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Hei Anna,


Kiitos hauskasta kertomuksestasi.😄 Lauseesi ovat aivan oikein! Hyvä!


Let us know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Anna
Sunday at 02:43 AM
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Minulla on kaksi kissaa. Yksi kissa on vähän lihava ja laiska, mutta toinen on erittäin aktiivinen ja voi olla tuhma. Vielä rakastan niitä!