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Finnish Civil War & Memorial Day for the War Dead

Memorial Day for the War Dead

Memorial Day for the War Dead (also commonly referred to as Commemoration Day of Fallen Soldiers) is one of Finland’s most significant holidays. It seeks to commemorate Finland’s losses in various wars, as well as losses from the countries it fought. In particular, the Finnish Civil War sparked the idea for this day of commemoration in the war commander Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim.

In this article, we’ll be going over what this holiday is and take a look at the wars this day seeks to commemorate. After reading this article, you’ll have a better grasp of Finland’s history and events leading up to its culture today, which is vital for any language-learner. At FinnishPod101.com, we hope to make this learning journey both fun and informative!

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1. What is the Commemoration Day of Fallen Soldiers?

The Memorial Day for the War Dead, otherwise known as the Commemoration Day of Fallen Soldiers, is when Finland remembers those who lost their lives in Finnish wars. The idea was put into effect by the Finnish war commander Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim in 1940.

This holiday seeks to commemorate the fallen soldiers of the following Finnish wars:

  • Finnish Civil War — 1918
  • Finnish Winter War (also known as the Russo-Finnish War or Finnish Russian War) — 1939-1940
  • Finland Continuation War — 1941-1944
  • Lapland War — 1944

While these are the main focus of Memorial Day for the War Dead in Finland, note that Finns also died in the Heimosodat wars and during U.N. peacekeeping missions.

2. When is Memorial Day for the War Dead Observed?

Defending One's Country

The date of the Commemoration Day of Fallen Soldiers varies from year to year, though it’s always on the third Sunday in May. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s dates for the next ten years.

  • 2019: May 19
  • 2020: May 17
  • 2021: May 16
  • 2022: May 15
  • 2023: May 21
  • 2024: May 19
  • 2025: May 18
  • 2026: May 17
  • 2027: May 16
  • 2028: May 21

3. How is Memorial Day for the War Dead Celebrated?

Tomb Decorated with Flowers

Celebrations and commemoration activities aren’t extensive in Finland, though this holiday is close to Finns’ hearts. Typically, church services are held on Memorial Day for the War Dead. Following these services, Finns often visit the graves and tombs of fallen soldiers to pay their respects and to simply remember the sacrifice they made.

4. Additional Information on the Finnish Wars

Let’s look at each main war that we mentioned earlier, to give you a better idea of Finland’s history and what this day means to them.

1- Finnish Civil War (1918 )

After the Russian Empire collapsed in WWI, Finland—who was, up until that point, under Russia’s control—was left with a shaky structure of governance, as well as a power vacuum. This took place during a time of growth and improvement in Finland, a time when change was sought after and becoming increasingly necessary.

Germany planned to gain control of Finland with Russia’s collapse. The plan was to turn Finland into a monarchy under German control—called the Kingdom of Finland—seeing as Finland had fallen into Germany’s sphere of influence.

In the meantime, German and Finnish troops fought against the Russian Empire. 36,000 Finns lost their lives in the conflict. However, upon Germany’s loss in WWI, this plan never came to full fruition and was soon cancelled.

This allowed Finland to become an independent and democratic nation, despite the country’s inner turmoil and unease for decades after.

2- Finnish Winter War (1939-1940)

The Finnish Winter War began in 1939 when the Soviet Union invaded Finland in hopes of gaining territory which Finland had denied it. After this invasion, Finland had good fortune for about two months, being able to ward off the offensive forces until the Soviet Union gathered its bearings again.

Fortunately, the war didn’t last very long, though it was fought in very cold temperatures during the winter months. The League of Nations decided that the Soviet Union’s offensive invasion was illegal, and the Moscow Peace Treaty was signed not long after. The Winter War lasted for three-and-a-half months, and led to heavy losses and a few gains for both sides involved (Finland and the Soviet Union).

The Soviet Union ended up gaining much land from Finland (eleven percent of it), but lost good standing in the eyes of other countries, not to mention that its military was exposed as being fairly weak and ineffective. Finland lost much land and had difficulty during the war attaining enough supplies and support, but gained a higher standing in the eyes of other countries after the Moscow Peace Treaty.

In St. Petersburg, there’s a monument dedicated to those lost during this war.

3- Finland Continuation War (1941-1944)

Not long after The Winter War, Finland once again fought against the Soviet Union. Germany served as a co-belligerent to Finland, having started the first battle against the USSR. The top three reasons for the war’s beginning are:

  • Regaining territory lost during The Winter War
  • Liberating Karelia
  • Expanding Finland to become “Greater Finland”

Ultimately, The Continuation War was a failure, ending in ceasefire.

In 1944, the Moscow Armistice was signed. The war resulted in the loss of 63,200 Finns, as well as 158,000 Finns with injuries.

4- Lapland War (1944-1945)

The Moscow Armistice signed to end the previous war posed a condition that led to the Lapland War between Finland and Nazi Germany: all German troops had to leave Finnish territory. This condition was made in light of the Soviet Vyborg—Petrozavodsk Offensive which took place in 1944.

The German evacuations were met with few problems at first, until the Soviet Union told Finland it needed to force the Germans out more effectively, as well demobilize the Finnish Army. As a result, Finland fought a few battles against Germany until most of the German forces had reached Norway (which it occupied at the time). In 1945, all of the German troops had left Finland.

WWII ended shortly after.

5. Useful Vocabulary for Commemoration Day of Fallen Soldiers

Candle for Grave

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for the Finnish Commemoration Day of Fallen Soldiers!

  • Sotilas — “Soldier”
  • Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim — “Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim”
  • Puolustaa — “Defend”
  • Sota — “War”
  • Hautakynttilä — “Grave candle”
  • Kaatua — “Fall”
  • Rauhanturvaaja — “Peacekeeper”
  • Sankarivainaja — “Hero of the deceased”
  • Menehtynyt — “Perished”
  • Leski — “Widow”
  • Sankarihauta — “Hero’s tomb”

To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, check out our Finnish Commemoration Day of Fallen Soldiers vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

Which event mentioned in this article do you think was the most interesting? Does your country have a holiday that honors those fallen in war? Let us know in the comments! We always love hearing from you.

To learn more about the culture in Finland and the Finnish language, visit us at FinnishPod101.com and take advantage of our numerous and effective learning tools. From insightful blog posts to free vocabulary lists and an online community forum, there’s something here for every learner! You can also create (or upgrade to) a Premium Plus account to begin using our MyTeacher program, where you can learn Finnish one-on-one with your own personal Finnish teacher.

We hope you took away something valuable from this article, and that you feel more knowledgeable about this aspect of Finnish history. Know that your hard work will pay off; before you know it, you’ll be speaking like a native Finn!

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How to Celebrate Easter in Finland

The Monday after Easter (Easter Monday) is Finland’s largest celebration during the Easter week. It’s a day of Finnish Easter pudding and more delicious traditional Finnish Easter food. However, it’s also a day of great religious significance for Finland’s Christian population. From its more religious celebrations to Easter witches, Easter in Finland is a delight!

Learn about Finland Easter traditions and more information about Easter in Finland with FinnishPod101.com! We hope to make learning about Finnish Easter both fun and informative; after all, cultural knowledge is a vital aspect of learning any language! So let’s get started.

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1. What is Easter Monday in Finland?

Easter, which is celebrated in-between March and April in Finland, is the oldest and most important Christian holiday.

Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus, but many Easter traditions of the Finns were originally pagan and are associated with the longer days. Easter week, which is also known as Silent Week, starts with Palm Sunday. The Easter holidays consist of Good Friday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday.

2. When is Easter Monday?

Daffodil Against White Background

The date of Easter Monday in Finland varies from year to year. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

  • 2019: April 22
  • 2020: April 13
  • 2021: April 5
  • 2022: April 18
  • 2023: April 10
  • 2024: April 1
  • 2025: April 21
  • 2026: April 6
  • 2027: March 29
  • 2028: April 17

3. Reading Practice: How is Celebrated?

Large Festive Dinner

How is Easter celebrated in Finland? Read the Finnish text below to find out (and find the English translation directly below it)!

Palmusunnuntaina lapset pukeutuvat pääsiäisnoidiksi ja lähtevät naapurustoon virpomaan, mukanaan koristelemansa värikkäät pajunoksat. Virpoja toivottaa onnea ja terveyttä pajunoksia heiluttamalla ja lausumalla samaan aikaan virpomislorun. Palkaksi pienet noidat saavat yleensä suklaamunia tai muita makeisia. Koristellut pajunoksat symboloivat palmusunnuntain palmunlehviä ja kevään saapumista. Pajunkissoja ja koivunoksia laitetaan myös kodeissa maljakkoon esille, sekä rairuohoa kasvatetaan kevään ja elämän juhlistamiseksi.

Mämmi on kaikista perinteisin suomalainen pääsiäisherkku. Se on imellettyä, makeaa ruispuuroa, joka valmistetaan ruismaltaasta ja ruisjauhoista. Mämmi tarjoillaan yleensä kuohukerman, maidon tai vaniljajäätelön kanssa. Pasha puolestaan on rahkajälkiruoka, joka on levinnyt suomalaisten pääsiäispöytiin ortodoksien perinteestä. Pääsiäiseen kuuluvat myös pieniä leluja sisältävät suklaamunat ja pääsiäisrakeet. Suolaisia herkkuja ovat erilaiset lammas- ja kalaruoat, verimakkara ja uunijuusto.

Aiemmin uskottiin, että juuri pääsiäisenä hyvät ja pahat voimat taistelevat keskenään. Savun ja kipinöiden uskottiin karkottavan noitia ja pahoja henkiä, joten pääsiäislauantaina sytytettiin suuria rovioita, eli pääsiäiskokkoja.

On Palm Sunday, children dress up as Easter witches and go around the neighborhood to do virpominen, carrying colorful willow branches they have decorated themselves. The person conducting the virpominen, known as the virpoja, gives wishes of happiness and good health while waving the willow branches, and reciting a rhyme called virpomisloru, to the receiver. As a reward, the little witches usually receive chocolate eggs or other sweets. The embellished willow branches symbolize the palm leaves from Palm Sunday and the arrival of spring. Willow catkins and birch twigs are also placed in a vase in homes, and Easter rye grass is grown to celebrate spring and life.

Mämmi is the most traditional Finnish Easter delicacy. It is malted, sweet rye porridge which is prepared from rye malts and rye flour. Mämmi is usually served with whipped cream, milk, or vanilla ice cream. Pasha, in turn, is a curd dessert that has spread to Finnish Easter tables from the Orthodox tradition. Chocolate eggs that contain small toys and Easter drops are also a part of Easter. Savory delicacies include different kinds of lamb and fish dishes, blood sausage, and baked cheese.

It was previously believed that during Easter, good and evil forces would fight each other. Smoke and sparks were believed to expel witches and evil spirits, so large stakes and Easter bonfires were lit on Easter Saturday.

4. Additional Information

Do you know any other names the “Holy Week” can go by?
Holy Week is also known as a Silent Week or Torment Week, and each day has its own special name, Palm Sunday, Beam Monday, Holy Tuesday, Holy Wednesday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday.

5. Must-know Finnish Vocab for Easter Monday

Purple Easter eggs in Ryegrass

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Easter Monday in Finland!

  • Tipu — “Chick”
  • Kristinusko — “Christianity”
  • Toinen pääsiäispäivä — “Easter Monday”
  • Ilmestyä — “Appear”
  • Opetuslapsi — “Disciple”
  • Vapaapäivä — “Day off”
  • Juhla-ateria — “Festive dinner
  • Narsissi — “Daffodil”
  • Rairuoho — “Ryegrass
  • Koivunoksa — “Birch twig”
  • Ylösnousemus — “Resurrection”

To hear each word pronounced, check out our Finnish Easter Monday vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

What do you think about the Finnish celebration of Easter? Are Easter celebrations similar in your country, or different? Let us know in the comments!

To learn even more about Finnish culture and the language, visit us at FinnishPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community to discuss lessons with fellow Finnish learners. You can also take advantage of our MyTeacher program, and learn Finnish with your own personal teacher, by upgrading to a Premium Plus account!

All of your efforts will soon reap rewards, and you’ll be speaking like a native in no time! And we’ll be here to teach you and support you all the way there! Best wishes and happy Easter (be sure to enjoy some Finnish chocolate Easter eggs for us)!

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How to Say I Love You in Finnish - Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Finnish could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Finnish partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At FinnishPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Finnish lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Finnish dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Finnish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Finnish Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Finnish Faster?

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1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Finnish love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Finnish word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Finnish date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Finnish Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • Haluaisitko mennä ulos syömään kanssani?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Finnish is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • Oletko vapaa tänä viikonloppuna?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • Haluaisitko hengailla kanssani?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • Mihin aikaan tapaisimme huomenna?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • Missä tapaisimme?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • Näytät hyvältä.

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • Olet niin söpö.

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • Mitä mieltä olet tästä paikasta?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Finnish language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • Voinko tavata sinut uudelleen?

So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • Mentäisiinkö jonnekin muualle?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • Tiedän hyvän paikan.

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • Ajan sinut kotiin.

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • Se oli hieno ilta.

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • Milloin voin nähdä sinut uudestaan?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • Soitan sinulle.

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Finnish phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Finnish below!

Date Ideas in Finnish

museum

  • museo

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

candlelit dinner

  • kynttiläillallinen

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • mennä eläintarhaan

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • mennä pitkälle kävelylle

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • mennä oopperaan

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

go to the aquarium

  • mennä merimaailmaan

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • kävellä rannalla

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • pitää piknik

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • laittaa ateria yhdessä

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • illastaa ja katsoa elokuva

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Finnish

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Finnish - think how impressed your date will be!

4. Finnish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Finnish yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Finnish? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Finnish love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Finnish

I love you.

  • Rakastan sinua.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Finnish carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

You mean so much to me.

  • Merkitset minulle niin paljon.

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • Olisitko minun ystävänpäivän rakas?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • Olet niin kaunis.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Finnish, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • Ajattelen sinua enemmän kuin ystävänä.

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Finnish dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • Sata sydäntä ei ole tarpeeksi kuljettamaan kaikki rakkauteni sinulle.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • Rakkaus on vain rakkautta. Sitä ei voi koskaan selittää.

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • Olet niin komea.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Finnish love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • Olen ihastunut sinuun.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • Saat minut haluamaan olla parempi mies.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Finnish girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • Olkoon kaikki mitä teet tehtävä rakastuneena.

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • Olet päivänsäteeni, rakkaani.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • Sanat eivät riitä kuvaamaan rakkauttani sinua kohtaan.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • Meidät oli tarkoitettu yhteen.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • Jos ajattelit jotakuta lukiessasi tätä, olet varmasti rakastunut.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

5. Finnish Quotes about Love

Finnish Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Finnish lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Finnish that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Finnish Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Finnish lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Finnish custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Finnish Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Meidän täytyy puhua.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Kyse ei ole sinusta. Vaan minusta.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Finnish lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • En vain ole valmis tällaiseen suhteeseen.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Ollaan vain ystäviä.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Finnish, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Minusta tuntuu, että tarvitsemme tauon.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Ansaitset parempaa.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Meidän pitäisi tapailla muita ihmisiä.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Tarvitsen tilaa.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Mielestäni etenemme liian nopeasti.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Minun täytyy keskittyä uraani.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • En ole tarpeeksi hyvä sinulle.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • En vain rakasta sinua enää.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Emme vain ole sopivat toisillemme.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Se on parempi niin.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Olemme kasvaneet erilleen.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Finnish faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. FinnishPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Finnish language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Finnish Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Finnish speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    FinnishPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Finnish, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Finnish even faster.

    2- Having your Finnish romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Finnish language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Finnish lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Finnish partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why FinnishPod101 helps you learn Finnish Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Finnish

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Finnish is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at FinnishPod101 is translated into both English and Finnish. So, while your partner can help you learn Finnish faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Finnish Culture
    At FinnishPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Finland. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Finnish partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Finnish Phrases
    You now have access to FinnishPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Finnish soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    Secret Revealed: The Best Way to Learn a Language on Your Own

    Learning A Language on Your Own

    Can You Really Learn Finnish Alone?

    Learning a language on your own or without traditional classroom instruction may seem quite daunting at first. What if you run into questions? How do you stay motivated and on track to achieving goals?

    Don’t worry, not only is it possible to learn Finnish or any language without traditional classroom instruction: FinnishPod101 has created the world’s most advanced and extensive online language learning system. Not only is FinnishPod101 specifically designed to help you with learning a language on your own, it’s actually faster, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom options!

    Let’s look at some of the benefits of learning Finnish or any language alone.

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    Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills too!

    3 Reasons to Learn a Language Alone

    Learning Alone

    1. Learn at Your Own Pace and On Your Schedule

    In today’s fast-paced world, there just isn’t time for traditional classroom instruction. Between getting to class and studying on some professor or teacher’s schedule, traditional classroom learning is simply impossible to fit in. But when you learn Finnish alone, you can study in bed if you like and whenever suits your schedule best, making it far easier to actually reach your goal of learning and mastering the language.

    2. Learning a Language on Your Own Reduces Stress and Anxiety

    Speaking in front of a class, pop quizzes, and tests are just a few of the stressors you will encounter when you learn a language in a traditional classroom setting. Specifically, these are external stressors that often derail most people’s dream of learning a new language. But when you learn Finnish alone, there are no external stressors. Without the external stress and anxiety, it becomes much easier and more exciting to study Finnish and reach your very own goals—all on your own!

    3. Learning Finnish Alone Helps Improve Cognitive Function and Overall Success

    Learning a language on your own is indeed more challenging in some ways than being taught in a traditional classroom setting. In fact, while classroom instruction requires more rote memorization and following instructions, studying a language on your own requires more problem-solving and higher cognitive function to self-teach lessons and hit goals. So while it’s more challenging and requires higher levels of cognition, teaching yourself a language pays dividends throughout life by better preparing you for social/work opportunities that arise.

    How to Learn a Language on Your Own with FinnishPod101

    Learning with FinnishPod101

    1. Access to the World’s Largest Collection of Finnish Audio & Video Lessons

    The best way to learn a language on your own is to study from native speaking instructors. Ideally, you want audio and/or video lessons that teach vocabulary, grammar, and provide actual Finnish conversations and dialogue to help you with pronunciation. FinnishPod101 has hundreds of hours of HD audio and video lessons created by real Finnish instructors and every lesson is presented by professional Finnish actors for perfect pronunciation. Plus, all lessons can be accessed 24/7 via any mobile device with Internet access. And, if you download the PDF versions of each lesson, you can even study without Internet access once the lesson is stored on your device!

    2. “Learning Paths” with Finnish Courses Based Upon Your Exact Needs & Goals

    Although FinnishPod101 has more than thousands of video and audio lessons, you need not review each and every one to learn the language. In fact, FinnishPod101 has developed a feature called “Learning Paths”. You simply tell us your goals and we will identify the best courses and study plan to help you reach them in the shortest time possible. So even though you are technically learning a language on your own, our team is always here to help and make sure you reach your goals FAST!

    3. Advanced Learning Tools Reduce Learning Time and Boost Retention

    When you have the right tools and Finnish learning resources, it’s actually easy to teach yourself a language! In the past 10+ years, FinnishPod101 has developed, tested, and refined more than 20 advanced learning tools to boost retention and reduce learning time, including:

    • Spaced Repetition Flashcards
    • Line-by-Line Dialogue Breakdown
    • Review Quizzes
    • Voice Recording Tools to Help Perfect Pronunciation
    • Teacher Feedback and Comments for Each Lesson
    • Finnish Dictionary with Pronunciation
    • Free PDF Cheat Sheets
    • And Much More!

    Armed with our growing collection of advanced learning tools, it’s truly a breeze to learn Finnish alone and reach your goals!

    Conclusion

    Learning a language on your own is not only possible, it’s actually easier and more beneficial for you than traditional classroom instruction. In fact, when you learn Finnish on your own you can study at your own pace, eliminate stress, and actually increase cognitive function.

    FinnishPod101 is the world’s most advanced online language learning system and a great resource to help you teach yourself a new language. With the world’s largest collection of HD audio and video lessons, more than 20 advanced learning tools, and customized “Learning Paths”, FinnishPod101 makes learning a new language easier, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom instruction.

    And the best part is: With FinnishPod101, you can study in bed, your car, or wherever you have a few spare minutes of time. Create your Free Lifetime Account now and get a FREE ebook to help “kickstart” your dream of learning a language on your own below!

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    Runeberg Paiva: Celebrate the Day of Johan Ludvig Runeberg!

    Day of Johan Ludvig Runeberg

    Johan Ludvig Runeberg was Swedish-Finnish and is known for his writing and poetry. He was born on February 5, 1804 and died on May 6, 1877. Runeberg rose to the status of Finland’s national poet during his lifetime, due to his work being very “patriotic,” or isänmaallinen.

    Runeberg has received numerous awards for his work and is highly honored in Finnish culture. Thus, by learning about Runeberg Paiva you’ll get a nice look at Finland’s history and its values. It’s our wish at FinnishPod101.com to help you learn all you need to know about Finnish culture, and this famous Finnish poet is no exception.

    So, who was Runeberg and what is Runeberg Paiva?

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    1. What is the Day of J.L. Runeberg?

    Runeberg’s best-known work is “The Tales of Ensign Stål,” or in Finnish Vänrikki Stoolin tarinat, which is a collection of Johan Ludvig Runeberg poems which commemorate the Finnish war. The opening poem of the work was later composed to become the “Finnish national anthem,” or Suomen kansallislaulu, called Maamme which means “Our Land.”

    Runeberg’s poems were written in Swedish and dealt largely with life in rural Finland. Another famous poem of his, “Bonden Paavo,” or “Farmer Paavo,” is about a poor farmer who persevered despite years of difficult climates and poor harvests. The farmer fights off starvation by mixing bark into his bread. After several years, he finally reaps a rich harvest. Despite assurances from God that he can now eat bread made solely from grain, the farmer continues to mix bark into his bread in order to share the bounty with his struggling neighbor.

    Runeberg has received numerous national accolades including a day dedicated in his honor. Runeberg’s home, located in the center of Porvoo, was the first museum house in Finland. In addition, a number of monuments and memorials have been erected in his honor, and numerous streets, squares, and parks have been named after him.

    For example, there is a Runeberg street in Helsinki and a Runeberg park in his birth city of Jakobstad. One of Finland’s most prominent “literary awards,” or kirjallisuuspalkinto in Finnish, the Runeberg Prize, was also established in his honor.

    Further, Runeberg has been memorialized with a commemorative coin to celebrate the 200th anniversary of his birth. The coin was minted in 2004, and features Runeberg’s portrait on one side and a font from a Swedish newspaper on the reverse.

    Thus, it’s clear why Runeberg is so highly regarded by the Finnish people. Enough so that there’s a day held each year in his honor: The Day of J.L. Runeberg or Runeberg Paiva.

    2. When is it?

    February 5

    Each year, the Finnish people celebrate the famous Finnish poet J.L. Runeberg on the date of his birth, February 5.

    3. How is it Celebrated?

    Runeberg Tarts

    Runeberg’s Day is a well-established “flag day,” or liputuspäivä. Literary-themed events are held this day at places such as bookstores and cafes. Further, the Runeberg Prize mentioned earlier is fittingly awarded on this day in Porvoo.

    A well-known way to celebrate the day is to eat “Runeberg tarts,” or Runebergintorttuja, which are sweet pastries said to have been Runeberg’s favorite treat. The baked goods are usually available in grocery stores and cafes from January up until the day of J.L. Runeberg. Some of the cafes in Porvoo offer the pastries all year round.

    The cylindrical shaped, arrack- or rum-flavored tarts contain wheat flour, bread crumbs, cookie crumbs, and almonds, and they are decorated with raspberry jam and icing. (Do we need to wait until Runeberg Paiva to eat these?!)

    4. Additional Information

    It’s said that Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife, Fredrika Runeberg, developed the pastry mentioned above for her sweet-toothed husband from whatever ingredients she could find in the pantry.

    She was also a distinguished writer; she was the first Finnish historical novel writer, achieving popularity through her short stories as well as her novels. Talk about a great match!

    4. Reading Practice: Fredrika Runeberg

    Learn more about Johan Runeberg’s wife in the Finnish text below (the English translation is below):

    • Myös Johan Ludvig Runebergin vaimo Fredrika Runeberg oli ansioitunut kirjailija. Hän oli ensimmäisiä suomalaisia historiallisen romaanin kirjoittajia. Romaanien lisäksi hän saavutti suosiota lyhyillä kertomuksillaan.
    • Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife, Fredrika Runeberg, was also a distinguished writer. She was the first Finnish historical novel writer, achieving popularity through her short stories as well as her novels.

    It’s also said that Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife developed Runeberg tarts for her sweet-toothed husband from whatever ingredients she could find in the pantry. Yum!

    5. Must-know Vocab

    Man Sitting at Typewriter with Drink

    Here’s some vocabulary for you to go over in order to fully understand this Finnish holiday and celebrate it to its fullest.

    • päivä — “day”
    • runoilija — “poet”
    • kirjailija — “writer”
    • toimittaja — “journalist”
    • kansallisrunoilija — “national poet”
    • kansallislaulu — “national anthem”
    • torttu — “tart”
    • manteli — “almond”
    • rommi — “rum”
    • liputuspäivä — “Flag Day”

    To hear the pronunciation of each word, be sure to check out our Finnish J.L. Runeberg Day vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied with an audio file so you can listen while you read.

    Conclusion

    As you can see, Johan Ludvig Runeberg was one of the most influential Finnish writers and his work holds great significance to the Finnish people. Thus, J.L. Runeberg Day is widely celebrated and held in reverence by many Fins.

    What do you think about Runeberg and the Finns’ celebration of him? Is there a famous writer or other influential person your country celebrates? Let us know in the comments!

    For more information on Finnish culture, visit us at FinnishPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, vocabulary lists on a variety of topics, and even an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow Finnish learners! You can even download our MyTeacher app to take advantage of a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal language teacher.

    We hope you enjoyed learning about this Finnish holiday, and that you’ll enjoy making Runeberg tarts even more! Until next time, good luck in your language-learning!

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    Language Learning Tips: How to Avoid Awkward Silences

    Avoid Awkward Silences

    Yes, even beginners can quickly learn conversational Finnish well enough to carry on real conversations with native speakers. Of course, beginners won’t be able to carry a conversation the same way they could in their native language. But, just knowing a few tips like which questions to ask to keep a conversation going are all you need to speak and interact with real native speakers! But before we get to specific suggestions, let’s first take a closer look at how having real Finnish conversations is so vital to your mastery of the language.

    Learning to Carry a Conversation is Vital to Mastery of Any Language

    Communicating with other people is the very point of language and conversation is almost second nature in our native tongue. For beginners or anyone learning a new language, conversations aren’t easy at all and even simple Finnish greetings can be intimidating and awkward.

    However, there are 3 vital reasons why you should learn conversational Finnish as quickly as possible:

    • Avoid Awkward Silences: Nothing kills a conversation faster than long periods of awkward silence, so you need practice and specific strategies to avoid them.
    • Improve the Flow of Conversation to Make a Better Impression: When you know what to say to keep a conversation going, communication becomes much easier and you make a better impression on your listener.
    • Master the Language Faster: Nothing will help you learn to speak Finnish faster and truly master the language than having real conversations with native speakers. Conversations quickly expose you to slang, cultural expressions, and vocabulary that force you to absorb and assimilate information faster than any educational setting—and that’s a great thing!

    But how can you possibly have real conversations with real Finnish people if you are just starting out?

    3 Conversation Strategies for Beginners

    Conversation

    1. Ask Questions to Keep a Conversation Going

    For beginners and even more advanced speakers, the key is to learn to ask questions to keep a conversation going. Of course, they can’t be just random questions or else you may confuse the listener. But, by memorizing a few key questions and the appropriate time to use them, you can easily carry a conversation with minimal vocabulary or experience. And remember, the more Finnish conversations you have, the quicker you will learn and master the language!

    2. Learn Core Vocabulary Terms as Quickly as Possible

    You don’t need to memorize 10,000’s of words to learn conversational Finnish. In fact, with just a couple hundred Finnish words you could have a very basic Finnish conversation. And by learning maybe 1,000-2,000 words, you could carry a conversation with a native speaker about current events, ordering in restaurants, and even getting directions.

    3. Study Videos or Audio Lessons that You Can Play and Replay Again and Again

    If you want to know how to carry a conversation in Finnish, then you need exposure to native speakers—and the more the better. Ideally, studying video or audio lessons is ideal because they provide contextualized learning in your native language and you can play them again and again until mastery.

    FinnishPod101 Makes it Easier and More Convenient Than Ever to Learn Conversational Finnish

    Learning Finnish

    For more than 10 years, FinnishPod101 has been helping students learn to speak Finnish by creating the world’s most advanced online language learning system. Here are just a few of the specific features that will help you learn conversational Finnish fast using our proven system:

    • The Largest Collection of HD Video & Audio Lessons from Real Finnish Instructors: FinnishPod101 instructors have created hundreds of video and audio lessons that you can play again and again. And the best part is: They don’t just teach you Finnish vocabulary and grammar, they are designed to help you learn to speak Finnish and teach you practical everyday topics like shopping, ordering, etc!
    • Pronunciation Tools: Use this feature to record and compare yourself with native speakers to quickly improve your pronunciation and fluency!
    • 2000 Common Finnish Words: Also known as our Core List, these 2,000 words are all you need to learn to speak fluently and carry a conversation with a native speaker!

    In all, more than 20 advanced learning tools help you quickly build vocabulary and learn how to carry a conversation with native speakers—starting with your very first lesson.

    Conclusion

    Although it may seem intimidating for a beginner, the truth is that it is very easy to learn conversational Finnish. By learning a few core vocabulary terms and which questions to ask to keep a conversation going, just a little practice and exposure to real Finnish conversations or lessons is all it really takes. FinnishPod101 has created the world’s largest online collection of video and audio lessons by real instructors plus loads of advanced tools to help you learn to speak Finnish and carry a conversation quickly.

    Act now and we’ll also include a list of the most commonly used questions to keep a conversation going so you can literally get started immediately!

    How to Transform Your Daily Commute Into Learning a Language

    Learn a language during your commute!

    Today, classrooms are no longer the only or even best place to learn a new language like Finnish. More and more people are finding that they can easily learn a language just about anywhere they have a few minutes of spare time, including their daily commute to work. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average American spends over 50 minutes a day commuting to and from work, or over 300 hours a year.

    Rethinking Your Daily Commute to Work

    But rather than simply sitting in traffic and wasting the time, you can instead use your daily commute to literally learn Finnish in just a few short months! FinnishPod101 has developed specialized learning tools that you can use on your commute to work (and home again) to master the language in your spare time. Keep reading to learn how to get your free audiobook to use on your next commute so you can see for yourself how easy it is to transform “dead time” into realizing your dream of learning a new language!

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    But before we look at how to transform your commute home into a mini-classroom, let’s take a closer look at 4 reasons why traditional classroom settings just aren’t the best option for most people in today’s fast-paced world.

    • Difficulty Getting to and From Class
    • Learning on Someone Else’s Schedule
    • Very Expensive and May Cost $1,000’s to Complete
    • Can Take Years to Finally Complete Classes and Learn the Language

    The simple truth is that traditional classroom instruction is simply not a viable option for most people in today’s very fast-paced, time-starved world. Now let’s examine how you can learn a language faster, more easily, and at far less expense than traditional classes—all during your commute to work and back home again!

    Bus

    3 Reasons Your Daily Commute Can Help You Master a Language

    1. The Average Commute Time is More than 300 Hours Per Year

    Between the commute to work and getting back home again, over 6 hours a week is completely wasted and not helping you reach any goals or objectives. But thanks to online language learning platforms with audiobooks and other resources that you can access during your commute, you can easily transform wasted time into tangible progress towards learning a new language. With over 300 hours available annually, your daily commute could provide you with enough time to literally master a new language each and every year!

    2. Increase Your Earning Potential While Commuting to Work

    How would you like to transform all those spare commuting hours each week into more money for a new car, house, or even a dream vacation? According to research, someone making $30,000 per year can boost their annual income by $600 or more per year by learning a second language. Added up over the course of a lifetime, you can boost your total earnings by $70,000 or more while achieving your dream of learning a new language during your daily commute!

    How? From work-at-home translation jobs to working overseas, there are many ways to leverage your second language into more money in your bank account! So instead of wasting your precious time, you can make your commute more productive and profitable and the more languages you learn, the higher your income potential.

    3. Repetition is Key to Mastering a New Language

    Not sure if it’s practical to learn another language while commuting to and from work each day? Well not only is it possible—learning in your car on the way to and from work each day can actually help you learn and master Finnish or any language much faster! The simple truth is that repetition is absolutely vital to truly internalizing and mastering any language. So, if you listen to audiobooks or even audio lessons on your commute to work and then repeat the same lesson on your commute home, the information is more likely to be “locked-in” to your long-term memory!

    Learning

    5 Ways FinnishPod101 Makes It Easy to Learn a Language On Your Commute

    FinnishPod101 has been helping people just like yourself learn and master Finnish in the comfort of their home, during their daily commute, or any place they have a few minutes of spare time. Here are five features provided by FinnishPod101 that make it easy to learn a new language while commuting to and from work:

    1. The Largest Collection of Audio Lessons on Planet by Native Speaking Instructors
    Every single week, FinnishPod101 creates new audio lessons by native speaking instructors. All lessons are short, to the point, and guaranteed to improve your mastery of Finnish.

    2. Word of the Day
    Simply exposing yourself to new information and vocabulary terms helps increase your fluency and mastery of Finnish. So every single day, FinnishPod101 adds a new Word of the Day for you to learn and memorize during your commute.

    3. Daily Dose Mini-Lessons
    Have a short commute to work but still want to make progress towards learning and mastering Finnish? Not a problem! Our Daily Dose Mini-Lessons are 1-minute or less and designed to improve your grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation.

    4. All Content Available on a Convenient Mobile App
    You don’t need a PC or tablet to learn Finnish during your daily commute. At FinnishPod101, all of our lessons, tools, and resources are available 24/7 via our Mobile App. That means you can access all of our audio lessons and other tools during your commute to work or any time you have a few spare moments!

    5. Audiobooks and Other Supplemental Resources
    In addition to the world’s largest online collection of HD audio lessons, FinnishPod101 has also created several audiobooks to enhance your understanding and make it more convenient than ever to learn a language during your commute!

    Conclusion

    The average commute time of most Americans is over 300 hours each year and it’s the perfect opportunity to learn and master a new language. In fact, you can use the “dead time” during your daily commute to learn a new language and potentially boost your lifetime earnings by up to $70,000 or more! Whatever your motivation, FinnishPod101 has the tools and resources necessary to help you learn a new language each year during your commute to and from work. Act now and we’ll even provide you with a free audiobook to try out on your next commute!

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    How To Say ‘Hello’ in Finnish, and Other Finnish Greetings!

    How to Say Hello in Finnish

    So, you’re heading for Finland to travel or work. Awesome! You’re in for an amazing adventure! It’s a beautiful country, steeped in a rich culture that may be very unlike your own.

    However, showing respect to the locals is a big deal in every country around the world. A respectful manner and attitude could open doors for you that would otherwise remain mystifyingly closed. Aside from just knowing ‘Thank you’ in Finnish, greeting someone correctly in Finnish could incline a local to treat you more favorably than otherwise! So, the clever thing to do would be to learn Finnish greetings before you embark on your journey. Finnish greetings are different from other languages and probably not what you’d expect. But if learning how to say ‘Hello!’ in Finnish in easy and fun ways is important to you, you’ve come to the right place at FinnishPod101.

    The focus of this lesson is greetings in Finnish

    Topic 1: How to say “Hello”

    Sentence from the lesson:

    Hei
    “Hello (Informal)”

    Hei means “Hi” or “Hello.” We can use this greeting with friends or relatives, but also with people we don’t know.
    The formal way of greeting people is Hyvää päivää! Literally, hyvää päivää means “Good day.” As a rule of thumb we can use hyvää päivää only during the daytime—from noon until early evening.
    During the evening we say: Hyvää iltaa! Ilta is Finnish for “evening,” so hyvää iltaa means “good evening.” Hyvää päivää and hyvää iltaa are used when we meet someone, but when we leave we don’t say these greetings again.
    For Example:

    Hyvää päivää!
    “Good day (formal)”

    Topic 2: How to say “Good-bye”

    Sentence from the lesson:

    Hei hei
    “Good-bye (informal)”

    When leaving a formal occasion, Finnish people say: Näkemiin. In Finnish we have an expression meaning “See you soon” that can be considered both formal and informal: Nähdään pian!

    Language Tip!

    In formal situations, Finnish people commonly greet each other by shaking hands. However, if we meet someone we are very friendly with, we hug each other. Don’t be afraid to do it with your Finnish friends—it’s normal!

    2. Common Ways to Say Hello in Finnish

    Finnish Greetings

    Standing at the airport in a foreign country for the first time can be a somewhat scary experience for anyone, especially if you need assistance. However, don’t worry - at FinnishPod101 we teach you how to quickly get a local’s attention with friendly, correct Finnish greetings! You are more likely to get helped this way.

    Here is our Finnish greetings list of all the general ways to address a person upon meeting. It is tailored for formal and informal situations.

    1- Good morning.

    Hyvää huomenta.

    ‘Good morning’ in Finnish is acceptable any time between approximately 5:30am and 12:00pm, when the day is still young. And smile - it’s the universal ice-breaker!

    2- Good evening

    Hyvää iltaa.

    This greeting is one you would use casually when night begins to fall. Address your friends, close family or close acquaintances, and those who are not your superiors, with this phrase.

    3- How are you?

    Miten voit?

    Show your friendly interest in another person’s well-being by asking this question. This is the casual greeting form that you would use with your friends and family. For the sake of the friendship, it would be good to listen carefully to the answer! It shows caring and selflessness on your part.

    4- How have you been?

    Miten voit?

    This is a good question to ask someone you have not seen for a while. The inference is that some catching-up is needed!

    5- What’s up?

    Miten menee?

    An universally informal and energetic way to greet your friends or equals! Literally, it means ‘What’s going on in your life?’, yet often no answer is expected. It’s just a greeting! Crazy, right?!

    6- Long time no see.

    Pitkästä aikaa.

    This phrase means is another greeting comment that means “I have not seen you for a while!” Often, no response is expected, except to reciprocate.

    7- Hey!

    Hei!

    This is a friendly exclamation to greet your friends or equals with. Reserve its use more for people you see regularly!

    Saying Hello

    8- Good afternoon.

    Hyvää iltapäivää

    ‘Good afternoon’ in Finnish is an informal greeting and is used during the second part of the day. The appropriate period falls, in most cultures, from 12:00am till sunset.

    9- How’s it going?

    Miten menee?

    This greeting phrase basically means the same as ‘How are things progressing?’, ‘How are things going in your life?’ or even ‘What’s up?’ Depending on the friendship, a lengthy answer is not always expected.

    10- It’s nice to see you again.

    On mukava nähdä taas.

    This friendly, welcoming phrase is best used after greeting someone you have not seen for a while. If you mean it, you will make the person feel special! This is a good thing to say to make someone feel welcome in Finnish.

    11- How’s everything?

    Mitä kuuluu?

    This is a variation of ‘How’s it going?’ Use casually with your equals or close acquaintances.

    12- How’s your day?

    Miten päiväsi sujuu?

    Ask this when you’re speaking to your Finnish friend during the day. It’s a friendly phrase to start a conversation with.

    13- Yo!

    Yo!

    Yo! is English slang and a universal greeting popular among young men of most nationalities. Rather don’t answer the phone with this, unless you know your caller well!

    14- Hello!

    Hei!

    Suitable for use in most settings, situations and persons, this is an important Finnish greeting to know. Be sure to master this word first at FinnishPod101!

    15- It’s nice to meet you.

    Mukava tavata sinut.

    When meeting someone for the first time, this is a polite and friendly way to welcome them. It means you are happy to make their acquaintance.

    3. Why Should You Choose FinnishPod101 To Learn How To Greet In Finnish?

    Online learning systems abound, and it’s not easy to know which one will suit your needs best. This means you have to be careful and select a system with a good reputation, and that has proven longevity. FinnishPod101, which is part of InnovativeLearning.com, ticks all the boxes! With millions of lesson downloads and over a decade of teaching, we can say with confidence that this is one of the best language learning systems on the web. Why is it such an excellent system? Let us count the ways…

    Finnish Teacher

    1- Video Presentations with Native Speakers

    Friendly native Finnish speakers guide you step-by-step through the process of learning vocabulary, phrases and much more. They demonstrate correct pronunciation and emphasis of the words, so as to ensure that you speak like a native when you’re done! Watching the enthusiastic tutors makes not only for a pleasant and more personal experience - it also allows you to copy mouth and lip movements. It’s like learning from your own Finnish friend in your own home!

    2- Superb Flexibility with 24/7 Access to Learning Material - Anywhere and on Any Device connected to the Internet!

    PC, Android, iPhone, iPad, laptop, even TV - whatever device you prefer! Go online with our FREE app to do your lessons, no matter where you are or which device you are using. All you need is a good internet connection to log on and learn to speak Finnish at your own pace, in your own place!

    3- Pronunciation Tool Ensures You Really Speak Finnish!

    In any language, correct pronunciation is often crucial. The nuances in language require this, or you could find yourself saying things you don’t mean. You will find our Pronunciation Tool invaluable to wrap your mouth around the correct way to greet in Finnish!

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    4- Our Content is Always New and Dynamic

    Every week, new audio and video lessons are uploaded, so as to keep our promise that learning Finnish with FinnishPod101 is always fun and exciting! In addition, you will get access to bonus material and basic Finnish phrases. These are a fantastic way to build your comprehension and speaking skills!

    5- Need to Fast Track your Learning? We Have the Solution!

    Most learning activities are more fun when you’re not doing them alone. For this reason we developed Premium PLUS, which gives you a personal tutor - 24/7! Also, this way you’re likely to learn to speak Finnish much faster!

    So, if our lively Finnish blog is not enough for you, just upgrade to Premium PLUS to get your very own teacher. Personalised goals and lessons based on your needs, assessment of your progress, non-stop feedback and many other super features makes this a very attractive option.

    Say ‘Hello’ to a wonderful, exciting way to learn another language, and learn how to say ‘Hello’ in Finnish in no time! You will be very happy you did!

    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Finnish

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Finnish!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Finnish Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can FinnishPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Finnish - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Finnish? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Finnish words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. joke - vitsailla
    2. funny - hauska
    3. lie - valehdella
    4. surprise - yllättää
    5. prankster - keppostelija
    6. prank - kepponen
    7. sneaky - ovela
    8. play a joke - höynäyttää
    9. humor - huumori
    10. fool - hölmö
    11. deceptive - petollinen
    12. April 1st - aprillipäivä

    2. Finnish Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Finnish Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Finnish to prank your favorite Finnish friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Finnish in 1 month.
      • Opin suomen kielen yhdessä kuukaudessa.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • Kaikki tunnit on tänään peruttu.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • Olen pahoillani, mutta rikoin juuri suosikkisilmälasisi.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • Joku törmäsi autoosi juuri.
    5. I’m getting married.
      • Olen menossa naimisiin.
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • Voitit vapaalipun.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • Näin autosi hinattavan pois.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • Rakennuksen edessä jaetaan ilmaisia lahjakortteja.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • Komea mies odottaa sinua ulkona.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • Kaunis nainen pyysi minua antamaan tämän puhelinnumeron sinulle.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • Voitko tulla alakertaan? Minulla on jotain erityistä sinulle
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • Kiitos rakkauskirjeestäsi tänä aamuna. En olisi koskaan voinut arvata tunteitasi.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Finnish, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can FinnishPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Finland, or if you work for any Finnish company, knowing the above Finnish prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Finnish words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Finnish - bone up your Finnish language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, FinnishPod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Finnish below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at FinnishPod101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Finnish - testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

    • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
    • To participate: Watch the video for instructions, and leave a comment to rate it. Your comment will make you eligible for large enrollment-fee discounts. To watch the video, please click the play button.

    Thank you for helping FinnishPod101! We’re serious about making learning Finnish fun.

    What to do When Learning Finnish Feels Overwhelming (5 Special Tips)

    What to do When Learning Finnish Feels Overwhelming (5 Special Tips)

    So you’ve decided to learn Finnish. At first the idea seemed exciting. You bought a phrasebook, dictionary, and a subscription to FinnishPod101, ready to dive head first into the language. For the first day or two all was well. You gained ground quickly, learning a few basic phrases and words. A week before learning Finnish was only a dream, now you were actually do it. Then the third and fourth day roll around. The excitement wears off. You encouraged yourself and continue, but then another week or two goes by. Suddenly Finnish doesn’t fill you with excitement anymore…now it feels more like dread.

    You start to realize how difficult learning a foreign language (and Finnish in particular) really is. Sometimes it feels like you’re drowning in grammatical cases, verb conjugations, and wonky pronunciation. It all seems too much to handle so you start to think about giving up.

    I’m here to encourage you not to give up. Learning a foreign language is difficult. I’m won’t pretend like it isn’t. But that doesn’t mean you can’t do it. Sometimes you just need to take a step back, reevaluate your approach, and come back to the language with a different perspective.

    It is true that there are different methods of learning a foreign language like Finnish (I for one prefer immersion), but even with the right method it can be easy to get discouraged.

    In this post we’ll look 5 ways to keep things simple so that you don’t have to feel overwhelmed when you’re learning Finnish.

    Studying

    1) Set aside a designated study time

    Consistency is key when learning a foreign language. Studying 15 minutes 7 days a week will profit you more than cramming in two hours one day a week. Set aside an amount of time that works best for you.

    If you can afford to spend an hour everyday learning Finnish that’s awesome. Go for it! But don’t feel bad if you can’t spend that much time. Even 10-15 minutes a day goes a long way. Breaking up your learning into manageable time segments will relieve a lot of the stress that can come with studying Finnish. Learning Finnish is not a race. Go at your own pace and try not compare your progress with anyone else’s.

    2) Take Finnish in one bite at a time.

    Now that you have your schedule under control, it’s time to focus on what you’ll actually be studying. I recommend that every one to two weeks you focus on learning a very specific piece of the Finnish language. It could be a conjugation group, case, tense, or collection of themed vocabulary. Whatever you choose hone in on it and do your best to feel comfortable with it before you move on to something else.

    Ever heard the adage, “How do you eat an elephant?”. Focusing on thing at a time helps you break the language into digestible chunks.

    reading

    3) Expose yourself to the language in different ways

    Don’t just sit around reading about Finnish grammar all day. Obviously knowledge of grammar is important, but you want to spice up your Finnish practice as much as possible. In addition to grammatical study try to mix in a combination of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

    Try to practice reading by either translating a simple Finnish article into English, or maybe (if you’re a beginner) pick up a Finnish children’s book. For writing you can try to write out a fictional conversation between you and well…yourself. Use the phrases you know to create a mock conversation, and take not of any words you can’t think of or don’t remember.

    To practice speaking you can find native Finnish speakers either locally at a language club or meetup or also online in a language exchange like Wespeke (it’s free). For listening a great Finnish podcast should do the trick (FinnishPod101 is one of the best).

    Spread out each type of practice (listening, reading, speaking, and writing), across your regular Finnish study schedule. This will give you a balanced experience in the language and should help keep things interesting. This method also works well when you use it to focus on a single aspect of Finnish like we talked about above.

    set mini goals

    4) Set mini goals, not just big ones

    If your only language learning goal is to be fluent in Finnish, you’re likely setting yourself up for disappointment. While speaking fluent Finnish can be your ultimate goal, it shouldn’t be your only one. Try to set mini goals month by month and week by week. It could be something simple “Learn 20 new verbs”, “Practice a new case”, or “Speak with 3 native speakers”. As long as it’s specific and reasonable to achieve in a shorter amount of time it should work fine.

    Not having mini goals alongside your ultimate goal is a lot like sprinting across a huge open field. There’s no reference point, so for much of the time it feels like you’re not any closer to your goal. It’s not that you’re not moving forward, it just feels like you’re not. Without any trees or buildings to run past it seems like you running in place.

    Mini goals are like the trees and buildings of your language race. They help you see that you are moving forward, and give you a sense of accomplishment.

    Strive for good finnish

    5) Strive for good Finnish, not perfect Finnish

    Perfection can be the enemy of progress. Don’t freak out when you struggle to speak or make a mistakes. It’s all a part of the learning process. Also don’t be afraid to speak, even if you know what you’ll say won’t be totally correct. It’s better to do your best to communicate in the language and get it wrong, than to never try at all.

    Conclusion

    Learning Finnish isn’t always easy, in fact often times it’s hard. Don’t let that discourage you though. Use these tips to help keep you focused yet unstressed in your language learning. A little perseverance will go a long way. Before long you’ll be speaking better Finnish than you may have thought was possible.

    So keep your head up and enjoy the ride! Remember than learning language doesn’t have to be just work. With the right mindsight it can be an adventure!