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Archive for the 'Finnish Language' Category

The Finnish Calendar: Talking About Dates in Finnish

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Did you know there are many different types of calendars?

As you probably know - a calendar is a system of organizing days in weeks and months for specific purposes, according to Wikipedia.

Worldwide, most countries use the Gregorian calendar. Some just work on the same framework, meaning that time is divided into units based on the earth’s movement around the sun - the “solar calendar”. Other calendars keep time by observing the moon’s movements, a combination of the moon and the sun’s movements, and seasons.

Through FinnishPod101, you can learn all about this and so much more! Our themed, culturally relevant lessons are skillfully designed so you can do your planning perfectly for a holiday or a date.

Having a good plan for a visit or a trip is like studying well for an exam. You’re just so much better prepared! For that, you could well need specific phrases to plan around appointments and such, especially on business trips. Make sure to use the charts we provide here with the days of the week in Finnish, as well as the months in Finnish to navigate your way as you plan. Great resources!

Also - always remember to have fun!

Table of Contents

  1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Finnish?
  2. Talking About your Plans
  3. Can FinnishPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Finnish


1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Finnish?

Days of the Week

Well, that’s not a difficult question to answer. No matter why you’re travelling, it would be best to at least know the names of days and months in Finnish. You don’t want to miss your flight or an appointment because you confused “perjantai” (Friday) with “lauantai” (Saturday)! Or maybe you planned a holiday for “heinäkuu” (July), but you booked a flight for “kesäkuu” (June) by accident!

Avoid this confusion by learning the Finnish calendar before you leave.

Now, as promised, the 15 phrases to help you make and discuss plans.


2. Talking About your Plans

Months of the Year

Perhaps you’re working in Finland, or maybe you’re enjoying a prolonged holiday. Fabulous! Memorize these phrases so you can be sure to successfully negotiate meetings, appointments, dates, events, the list goes on!

1. Mitä sinä teet tänä viikonloppuna?

“What are you doing this weekend?”

This question is usually a preamble to inviting someone somewhere. Given that it’s over the weekend, it probably means a casual get-together or another social event. (But not necessarily! A manager or boss could also ask this for entirely different reasons.)

It’s a handy phrase to know when you’ve made Finnish or expat friends in the country. Or, be the one doing the inviting. Then train your ear to learn the following phrases so you can understand the response.

2. Matkustan tänä viikonloppuna.

“I am traveling this weekend.”

This could be a reply if you’re not available because you’re doing other fun stuff.

No matter why you are visiting Finland, do take the time to explore the country! It’s beautiful and it has so many wonderful, interesting spots ready to be visited.

Couple at booking in Desk

3. Aion jäädä kotiin.

“I am planning to stay at home.”

Maybe you feel unwell, but don’t want to give too much information? Or maybe you have work to do? Perhaps you just need some quiet gardening time…it doesn’t matter. This response is polite and honest without oversharing.

It could also be a slightly open-ended response, depending on how you deliver it. Because hey, being home could still mean your plans are flexible, right?

That said - depending on your relationship with the inviter, nuances like these will probably not be so apparent in a foreign culture. So, best to use this excuse for declining an invitation only if you are truly set on staying in.

Woman Doing Gardening

4. Tällä viikolla olen kiireinen.

“This week I am busy.”

Another polite phrase that gives a reason for declining an invitation but without oversharing details.

Don’t decline too many invitations, though! You don’t want people to think that you’re too busy to hang out with them. They will stop inviting you out, and you know how the saying goes - all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy…! Being social is good for the soul.

5. Olen vapaa huomenna.

“I am free tomorrow.”

Yay! Perhaps you were approached by that person and they asked about your availability for a date. This would be a fine reply. Not too eager, but still indicating that you’re interested.

Or maybe you’re just replying to a colleague or manager’s request for a meeting. Polite, honest and clear.

Alternatively, you’re just busy right now, and plans are not going the way they were…well, planned. Compromise is a lovely thing! And this phrase sounds just like that.

Use it to indicate that you want to accommodate an invitation or the inviter’s plans, despite your current unavailability. Only if you are really free, of course.

6. Voimmeko suunnitella tämän uudelleen?

“Can we reschedule this?”

So, life happened and you are unable to meet obligations or attend a planned meeting. This is a suitable question to ask if you wish to indicate your willingness to still engage with whatever is on the table.

Obviously you should (ideally) not ask to reschedule a party or big meeting! (Unless you’re the boss or it’s your own party, of course.) But if there’s reasonable wiggle room regarding arrangements, then this one’s your question.

Business Man Sitting with Schedule

7. Minulla on tarpeeksi aikaa kuukauden lopussa.

“I will have enough time at the end of the month.”

A go-to phrase when events or activities are likely to take up a lot of your time, such as going away for a weekend, spending the day at a local market, or writing your manager’s quarterly report (with 20 flow-charts in Powerpoint) - anything that won’t only take an hour or two.

8. Milloin on sinulle sopivin aika?

“When is the best time that suits you?”

Remember phrase #5? That was a possible reply to this question. Asked by your crush, very possibly! Or, it could be asked by any other person for any other reason, doesn’t matter.

If this is addressed to you, it usually means that the person respects your time and schedule, which is a good thing. It probably also means that their own schedule is flexible, another good thing.

This is also a polite question to ask when a manager or senior colleague wants to meet with you. Let them decide on the time, and be as accommodating as possible. This attitude shows respect for seniority - good for career building. (Within reason, of course. You don’t need to postpone your wedding or your paid-up holiday to Australia because your manager wants to see you.)

Screen Tablet Hotel

9. Onko tämä päivämäärä OK sinulle?

“Is this date OK with you?”

But - if the other party insists that you choose a time for a meeting, appointment, or date etc., then do so! Respond with this nice, somewhat casual question that leaves space for negotiation, but only needs a simple reply.

Suitable for friends, and casual acquaintances and colleagues.

10. Oletko käytettävissä kyseisenä päivänä?

“Are you available on that day?”

This is the a-bit-more-formal version of the previous question. Again, it has room for negotiation, but only needs a simple response - nice and neat!

Maybe this is the go-to question when you’re addressing your seniors at work, or a person much older than you.

11. Voimmeko tehdä sen mahdollisimman pian?

“Can we do it as soon as possible?”

This question has an urgency to it that should preferably be responded to with the same. A simple reply will be good - yes or no. Less negotiable, this is still polite because it’s a question that gives you a choice.

But stand ready with one of the phrases in this article to help tie down a time and date!

Couple Getting Engaged on a Bridge

12. Olen käytettävissä joka ilta.

“I’m available every evening”

If you’re going to reply with this phrase, context is everything.

- If it’s your manager asking you to put in a bit of overtime, and you are available to - great reply! When deadlines are tight and everybody is stressing, your willingness to go the extra mile can only improve your relationship with your boss.

(Still, no need to be a doormat! If you get asked to work overtime too often, or if everyone else is goofing around while you have to graft, then re-evaluate the situation. And if you feel you’re being exploited a bit, don’t stress! Equip yourself with the diplomatic, yet assertive responses right in this article.)

- If it’s an old friend or longtime significant other asking to hang out - good reply. You know one another and appearances don’t matter any longer.

- If it’s a new crush who just asked when you’d be available for a date - stop. Not such a great reply. Tone down a bit! “Interested but not overly eager” is what you’re going for here.

Refer back to response #5, or use a counter-question, such as #1. Whatever suits you.

But if they - or anyone else - invite you to scale the Himalayas with them, then the next phrase will probably be the only sane response!

Mountaineer in Snow

13. Minun täytyy suunnitella tämä hyvin etukäteen.

“I need to plan this well in advance.”

So, as said under #9, perhaps you’re invited to join someone conquer the Himalayas.

Or your company manager wants you to plan the Party that Tops All Year-End Parties Forever.

Simply - if you get asked to do something that you know will need a lot of thorough planning, this is a good phrase to respond with.

It’s an assertive phrase that demonstrates two things regarding your attitude:

a) That you know your own abilities, and respect your own schedule.
b) That your respect other people’s time and schedule too.

Then just be sure to actually do that planning well in advance!

14. Meidän on löydettävä toinen päivämäärä.

“We need to find another date.”

So, you’re in negotiations regarding a date.

This is an assertive statement that should probably not be used with a “My way or the highway” attitude.

That stuff only works in the movies - think sharp-tongued Samuel L. Jackson. Or fierce Kristen Stewart. Yea, they can be scary, so tone down that tone.

Also, be mindful that fickle people who change plans all the time don’t keep friends! Taking others’ needs into consideration, while simultaneously having your way is a delicate art that takes proper cultivation. Use this phrase sparingly - we have better ones here to negotiate with.

Rock Concert Hands in the Air

Of course, if your planned trip to the dentist falls on the same day as the only Billie Eilish concert close by…well, priorities are priorities. Feel free to call the dentist with this phrase. Or even better, use the next one.

15. En voi tehdä sitä sinä päivänä.

“I cannot do it on that day.”

This is the low-key-but-still-firm cousin of the previous phrase. You’re stating a personal fact, and depending on your tone, this can be as non-negotiable as you prefer.

Again, only use this when you really mean it, if you’re visiting Finland or any other foreign country.

So, that’s it, folks! Which phrase did you find the most helpful? Let us know in the comments!


3. Can FinnishPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Numbers

Well yes, of course!

We think you will find these phrases easy to use when talking about dates and months in Finnish. But knowing how to employ them properly could help you avoid sticky situations!

FinnishPod101 is uniquely geared to help you with this and so much more.

This InnovativeLanguage.com initiative is one of many online language-learning courses. With us, you’ll find it easy and fun to learn a new language, and here are a few reasons why:

  • Immediately upon enrollment, you’ll receive hundreds of well-designed lessons to get you going.
  • Watch superb recordings of native Finnish speakers in cool slide-shows - the easy way to practice till you sound just like a native speaker yourself!
  • Also immediately upon enrollment, you’ll get access to a huge library of free resources! These include extensive, theme-based Vocabulary Lists and a Word of the Day List (For free, hot bargains!) These alone are sure to give your vocab-learning boxing gloves.
  • You’ll also immediately be able to use an excellent and free Finnish online dictionary. Necessary for quick, handy translations, no matter where you find yourself.
  • For the serious learner, there are numerous enrollment upgrades available, one of which offers you a personal, online Finnish host. Allow us to hold your hand and support you in your learning!

If you’re serious about mastering Finnish easily yet correctly, FinnishPod101 is definitely one of, if not the best, online language learning platforms available. Talking about your plans or dates in Finnish need not ever spoil your stay.

So, hurry up—enroll today!

Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Finnish

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive - humans and animals alike!

At FinnishPod101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Finnish Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How FinnishPod101 Can Help You Learn Finnish Family Terms

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Finnish


1. Why Is It Important to Know Finnish Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Finnish culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD - feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.


2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, FinnishPod101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Finland.

Here are some of the most important Finnish vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Finnish Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
perhe
Great grandfather
isoisoisä
Mother
äiti
Grandmother
isoäiti
Father
isä
Grandfather
isoisä
Wife
vaimo
Grandchild
lapsenlapsi
Husband
aviomies
Granddaughter
pojantytär, tyttärentytär
Parent
vanhempi
Grandson
pojanpoika, tyttärenpoika
Child
lapsi
Aunt
täti
Daughter
tytär
Uncle
setä, eno
Sister
sisko
Niece
veljentytär
Brother
veli
Nephew
veljenpoika
Younger sister
pikkusisko
Younger brother
pikkuveli
Older brother
isoveli
Great grandmother
isoisoäiti
Cousin
serkku
Mother-in-law
anoppi
Father-in-law
appi
Sister-in-law
käly
Brother-in-law
lanko
Partner
kumppani

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Finnish Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Finnish language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Finnish literature, or make use of ours!

Sinä et valitse perhettäsi. He ovat Jumalan lahja sinulle, kuten sinäkin olet heille.

“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” - Desmond Tutu

Perhe ei ole tärkeä asia. Se on kaikki.

“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” - Michael J. Fox

Perhe tarkoittaa, ettei ketään jätetä yksin eikä unohdeta.

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” - David Ogden Stiers

Perheeni on voimani ja heikkouteni.

“My family is my strength and my weakness.” - Aishwarya Rai

Perhe on yksi luonnon mestariteoksista.

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” - George Santayana

Kun ongelmia tulee, perheesi on se, joka tukee sinua.

“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” - Guy Lafleur

Perhe on yhteiskunnan perussolu.

“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” - Pope John XXIII

Ei ole olemassa sellaista asiaa kuin hauskaa koko perheelle.

“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” - Jerry Seinfeld

Sinun täytyy puolustaa kunniaasi. Ja perhettäsi.

“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” - Suzanne Vega

Kaikki onnelliset perheet ovat toistensa kaltaisia; jokainen onneton perhe on onneton omalla tavallaan.

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” - Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Finnish vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. perhe a. My male child
2. äiti b. My older male sibling
3. isä c. My female sibling
4. vaimo d. My child’s child
5. aviomies e. My child’s female child
6. vanhempi f. My female parent
7. lapsi g. My grandparent’s mother
8. tytär h. Mother to one of my parents
9. poika i. Relatives
10. sisko j. My female child
11. veli k. My younger male sibling
12. pikkusisko l. Male spouse
13. pikkuveli m. The father of one of my parents
14. isoveli n. My child’s male child
15. isoisoäiti o. My children’s father or mother
16. isoisoisä p. The sister of one of my parents
17. isoäiti q. The brother of one of my parents
18. isoisä r. My male parent
19. lapsenlapsi s. My sibling’s female child
20. pojantytär, tyttärentytär t. My sibling’s male child
21. pojanpoika, tyttärenpoika u. My male sibling
22. täti v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. setä, eno w. Female spouse
24. veljentytär x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. veljenpoika y. The person I am a parent to
26. serkku z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it - you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at FinnishPod101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping


3. How FinnishPod101 Can Help You Learn Finnish Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Finnish vocabulary!

FinnishPod101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Finnish easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Finnish culture, including the Finnish family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 - An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 - A new Finnish word to learn every day
3 - Quick access to the Finnish Key Phrase List
4 - A free Finnish online dictionary
5 - The excellent 100 Core Finnish Word List
6 - An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Finnish language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, FinnishPod101 will be there every step of the way toward your Finnish mastery!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Finnish

Answers: 1.i. 2.f. 3.r. 4.w. 5.l. 6.o. 7.y. 8.j. 9.a. 10.c. 11.u. 12.z. 13.k. 14.b. 15.g 16.x. 17.h. 18.m. 19.d. 20.e. 21.n. 22.p. 23.q. 24.s. 25.t. 26.v.

FinnishPod101’s Essential Finnish Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Finland. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag - another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at FinnishPod101! Why don’t you take the time to study Finnish travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Finnish friends or travel guide with your flawless Finnish!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. FinnishPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Finnish people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Finnish phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Finnish. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Finland will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Finnish.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider - from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!


2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Finnish, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) Kiitos (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity - know how to say “thank you” in Finnish.

2) Puhutteko englantia? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything - you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) Meneekö lentokentältä bussia kaupunkiin? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) Onko tämä oikea bussi lentokentälle? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) Anteeksi, mitä matka maksaa? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount - especially if the currency has cents.

6) Minulla on varaus (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) Onko teillä vapaita huoneita tänä iltana? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) Missä on rautatie-asema? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) Olen allerginen maapähkinöille (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Finnish.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Finnish on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Finnish if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) Onko teillä mitään kasvisruokia? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Finnish.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) Voisinko saada kartan? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) Paljonko tämä on? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Finnish will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) Käykö teillä luottokortti? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk


3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) Onko Wi-Fi-ilmainen? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) Voisitko ottaa minusta kuvan? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) Onko teillä mitään suosituksia? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Finnish friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) Haluaisin savuttoman istuinpaikan, kiitos (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) Vettä, kiitos (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) Voisinko saada laskun? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) Mitä suosittelette matkamuistoksi? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.


4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.


5. FinnishPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Finnish? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

FinnishPod101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Finnish reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

- An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
- A new Finnish word to learn every day
- Quick access to the Finnish Key Phrase List
- A free Finnish online dictionary
- The excellent 100 Core Finnish Word List
- An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Finnish-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime - an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Finnish speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Finnish friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With FinnishPod101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How to Use Finnish Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Finland, using the correct Finnish numbers for counting in Finnish could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Finnish Numbers?
  3. Learning Finnish Numbers
  4. Why Choose FinnishPod101 to Learn all about Finnish Numbers?

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1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Finnish Numbers?

For us at FinnishPod101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Finland or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Finnish Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Finnish number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Finnish numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Finnish numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Finnish speaker and friendly FinnishPod101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Finnish numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Finnish number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Finnish words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose FinnishPod101 to Learn all about Finnish Numbers?

FinnishPod101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! FinnishPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Finnish!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Finnish with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Finnish dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about FinnishPod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Finnish teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Finnish word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Finnish level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with FinnishPod101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Finnish numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

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How To Post In Perfect Finnish on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Finnish, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Finnish.

At Learn Finnish, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Finnish in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Finnish

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Finnish. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Juha eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Juha’s post.

Lämmin suositus! Tästä ravintolasta saa mahtavaa sushia.
“A warm recommendation! You can get awesome sushi from this restaurant.”

1- Lämmin suositus!

First is an expression meaning “A warm recommendation!”
The first word means “warm,” and the second word means “recommendation.” You can use this expression whenever you want to recommend something or someone in a warm-hearted, empathetic way.

2- Tästä ravintolasta saa mahtavaa sushia.

Then comes the phrase - “You can get awesome sushi from this restaurant..”
You can use the expression, which means “You can get awesome…from this…”, to say you can find or buy something great from a shop or a restaurant. Sushi is quite trendy and popular in Finland, but as it isn’t a Finnish dish, not everyone has tried it. Also, usually only the bigger cities in Finland have sushi restaurants.

COMMENTS

In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

1- Nam! Näyttää herkulliselta.

His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Yum! Looks delicious.”
Use this expression to show you are appreciative of the food depicted in the photo.

2- En ole koskaan maistanut, mutta näyttää mielenkiintoiselta. Mukavaa iltaa!

His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “I have never tasted it, but it looks interesting. Have a nice evening!”
Use this expression to share personal information about the food, and wish the poster a pleasant experience.

3- Ehkä Juha viet tytöt joskus tuonne syömään?

His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Perhaps, Juha, you will take the girls to eat there sometime?”
Use this question only if you know the poster well - in context, you want the poster to take someone to the same restaurant.

4- Mennään kaikki yhdessä joku ilta!

His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s all go together some evening!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling sociable and would like to get together with the poster.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • suositus: “recommendation”
  • mahtava: “awesome”
  • näyttää joltakin: “to look like something”
  • maistaa (taste): “to taste”
  • mielenkiintoinen (interesting): “interesting”
  • mukava (nice): “nice”
  • yhdessä: “absolutely”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Finnish restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Finnish

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everyone loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Finnish phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Anne goes shopping with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Shoppailuterapiaa siskon kanssa! Upeita löytöjä.
    “Shopping therapy with my sister! Great findings.”

    1- Shoppailuterapiaa siskon kanssa!

    First is an expression meaning “Shopping therapy with sister!”
    The first word comes directly from the English phrase “shopping therapy.” You can use it in a playful way to describe time spent shopping as therapeutic.

    2- Upeita löytöjä.

    Then comes the phrase - “Great findings..”
    This expression is in the plural form. The first word means “great” or “fantastic.” The second word means “findings,” but when talking about shopping, it can also refer to “bargains.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Säästäkää jotakin mullekin!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Please, spare something for me too!”
    Use this expression to be funny and tease the poster a bit.

    2- Älä tuhlaa liikaa…

    Her boyfriend, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t spend too much…”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling concerned about the poster’s spending habits. But usually, this is not a topic you would discuss seriously on social media, so it serves more as a comment just to make conversation.

    3- Muista ostaa Juhalle tuliaisia!

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Remember to buy some souvenirs for Juha!”
    Use this expression when you want to contribute to the conversation with a suggestion.

    4- Olette varmasti löytäneet kauniita vaatteita. Pitäkää hauskaa!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “I’m sure you found some beautiful clothes. Have fun!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and wish the shoppers well.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • shoppailuterapia: “shopping therapy”
  • löytö: “finding”
  • säästää: “to spare”
  • mullekin: “for me too (spoken language)”
  • tuliainen: “souvenir”
  • kommentti: “comment”
  • löytää: “to find”
  • vaate: “a piece of clothing”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Finnish

    Sport events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunities for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Finnish.

    Juha plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Tänään rantalentistä poikien kanssa. Vierivä kivi ei sammaloidu!
    “Today, beach volley with the boys. The rolling stone gathers no moss!”

    1- Tänään rantalentistä poikien kanssa.

    First is an expression meaning “Today beach volley with the boys. .”
    Finns often refer to their male friends as “boys,” even when they’re already adults. The word for “volleyball” used here is actually a shortened version and a common nickname for the sport.

    2- Vierivä kivi ei sammaloidu!

    Then comes the phrase - “The rolling stone gathers no moss!”
    Unlike in English, in Finnish this common phrase is an appreciation of an active and energetic lifestyle. The first word means “rolling,” the second “stone”, and the third and fourth words together mean “does not gather moss.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Koita osua palloon!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Try to hit the ball!”
    Use this expression when you’re joking with the poster’s sport abilities.

    2- Taitaa olla myöhäistä…

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “I think it’s too late…”
    Use this expression if you are feeling concern over the time of the day.

    3- Upeaa! Kiva että viihdytte ulkona.

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Fantastic! It’s nice that you’re enjoying the outdoors.”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation with general, pleasant comments.

    4- Haluatteko poikien kanssa saunaan pelin jälkeen? Voin laittaa sen päälle.

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Do you want to go to the sauna with the boys after the game? I can switch it on.”
    This is a sentence that’s dependent on context and your relationship with the poster. The action, however, shows care and concern.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • rantalentis: “beach volley”
  • vieriä: “to roll”
  • sammaloitua: “to become mossy”
  • osua: “to hit”
  • myöhäinen: “late”
  • viihtyä: “to enjoy”
  • kanssa: “with”
  • laittaa päälle: “to switch on “
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Finnish

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Anne shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Ihana biisi, mitä kuuntelin eilen koko illan.
    “A wonderful tune that I listened to the whole evening yesterday.”

    1- Ihana biisi

    First is an expression meaning “A wonderful tune.”
    The first word means “wonderful” or “lovely.” The second is a colloquial word for “song.” This is used most often by young people or people in the music industry.

    2- mitä kuuntelin eilen koko illan.

    Then comes the phrase - “which I listened to the whole evening yesterday..”
    This sentence is in the past tense. After the relative pronoun, the first word is “I listened to”. The second word is “yesterday.” The third word is “whole,” and the last word means “evening.” The last word is in the genitive case. You can change the sentence by using another indication of time.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Söpö laulaja!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Cute singer!”
    Use this expression to share an opinion that agrees with the poster’s.

    2- Hänen keikalle olisi kiva mennä.

    Her high school friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “It would be nice to go to his gig.”
    Use this expression when you also like the music and express a wish to experience the artist live.

    3- Minä en ymmärrä nykymusiikkia enää ollenkaan..

    Her supervisor, Hannu, uses an expression meaning - “I don’t understand contemporary music at all anymore…”
    Use this expression to share an opinion that doesn’t agree with the poster’s. This is probably what an older person would comment about the music.

    4- Tämä biisi on jo tosi vanha!

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “This song is already really old!”
    This is another personal opinion, which is also different from the poster’s. It’s more likely the thing a younger, trendy person would say about the music.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ihana: “lovely, wonderful”
  • biisi: “song”
  • kuunnella: “to listen”
  • söpö: “cute”
  • keikka: “gig”
  • nykymusiikki: “contemporary music”
  • ollenkaan: “at all”
  • tosi: “really”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Finnish Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Finnish!

    Juha goes to a concert, posts an image of the band, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Basso raikaa, nyt rokataan!
    “The bass is blaring. Let’s rock!”

    1- Basso raikaa

    First is an expression meaning “The bass is blaring.”
    The first word is direct from English and, naturally, means “bass.” The second word is an old verb, which means “to blare.” This refers to hearing loud music or other sounds. It’s also used almost only in the third person singular.

    2- nyt rokataan!

    Then comes the phrase - “let’s rock!.”
    The first word means “now,” and the second is the passive tense of the verb “to rock.” You can use this expression, for example, when you’re in a fun, laidback situation with friends and are about to start an energetic activity.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Eikä! Mahtavaa!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “No way! That’s great!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    2- Ostit kuitenkin varmasti korvatulpat.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Nonetheless, you surely bought earplugs.”
    Use this expression if you think the music is too loud and not good for a person’s hearing. It’s a suggestion to the poster.

    3- Tuun ensi kerralla mukaan!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “I’m coming along next time!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling eager to join the poster next time.

    4- Älä riehu liikaa…

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t rave too much…”
    This comment is expressing a concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • raikua: “to blare”
  • rokata: “to rock”
  • eikä: “no way”
  • kuitenkin: “nonetheless”
  • varmasti: “surely”
  • korvatulpat: “ear plugs”
  • ensi kerralla: “next time”
  • riehua: “to rave”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Finnish

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Finnish phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Anne accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Voi itku, kännykkä on mäsänä! Minut tavoittaa toistaiseksi siis vain somen ja sähköpostin kautta.
    “Oh no, my phone is smashed! For now, you can only reach me through social media and e-mail.”

    1- Voi itku, kännykkä on mäsänä!

    First is an expression meaning “Oh no, my mobile phone is smashed! .”
    The first two words of the sentence are a phrase expressing frustration and vexation when encountering a surprising, negative incident. The first word means “oh,” and the second word means “cry.” The third word is a kind of a nickname, a common colloquial name for a mobile phone. The last word of the sentence is a spoken language word for something that is broken or shattered.

    2- Minut tavoittaa toistaiseksi siis vain somen ja sähköpostin kautta.

    Then comes the phrase - “So for now, you can reach me only through social media and e-mail..”
    Social media is commonly referred to in Finland using the first two initials of each word: S-O and M-E.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mitä tapahtui?

    Her boyfriend, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “What happened?”
    Use this expression if you would like more information about the incident the poster describes.

    2- Voi ei! Korvaako vakuutus?

    Her friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Oh no! Does the insurance cover it?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling sorry for the poster about the incident, and want to know more details.

    3- Voi miten kurjaa!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, how miserable!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling sympathy for the poster’s plight.

    4- Siis tuhosit taas yhden puhelimen. Aikamoinen terminaattori.

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “So you destroyed another phone yet again. Quite the terminator.”
    Use this expression to employ a bit of sarcasm in a humorous way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • itku: “cry”
  • kännykkä: “mobile phone”
  • mäsä: “broken”
  • some: “social media”
  • sähköposti: “e-mail”
  • korvata: “to compensate”
  • vakuutus: “insurance”
  • aikamoinen: “quite the”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Finnish. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Finnish

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Finnish!

    Juha gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Kuolen tylsyyteen… pakko keksiä jotakin tekemistä!
    “I’m dying of boredom… I must come up with something to do!”

    1- Kuolen tylsyyteen…

    First is an expression meaning “I’m dying of boredom….”
    The first word simply means “I am dying.” The second one means “of boredom.” This phrase isn’t meant seriously, of course; it’s just a playful exaggeration to say an experience is unbearable.

    2- pakko keksiä jotakin tekemistä!

    Then comes the phrase - “I must come up with something to do!”
    The first word is a noun for “compulsion.” Together with a verb, it can be used to express that you must do something. This expression is used relatively often in Finnish conversations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tuu korjaamaan mun pyörä!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Come and fix my bike!”
    Use this expression to joke with the poster and their situation.

    2- Olisiko tänään hyvä päivä pihatöille?

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Would today be a good day for yardwork?”
    This is another expression that could be meant as a joke, or, in this context, perhaps the girlfriend is a bit serious about the suggestion?!

    3- Aina voi opiskella!

    His supervisor, Hannu, uses an expression meaning - “You can always study!”
    Use this expression to suggest another activity for the poster.

    4- Ota kerrankin vain rennosti! Katso joku hyvä elokuva?

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “For once, just take it easy! Maybe watch a good movie?”
    Use this expression to suggest a leisurely activity to alleviate the poster’s boredom.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kuolla: “to die”
  • tylsyys: “boredom”
  • pakko: “must”
  • tekeminen: “doing”
  • korjata: “to fix”
  • pihatyöt: “yardwork”
  • ottaa rennosti: “to take easy”
  • elokuva: “movie”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Finnish

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Finnish about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Anne feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Vitsi mikä päivä! Aivot ei toimi enää ollenkaan. Kauhea nälkä.
    “Oh man, what a day! My brain doesn’t function at all anymore. So hungry.”

    1- Vitsi mikä päivä! Aivot ei toimi enää ollenkaan.

    First is an expression meaning “Oh man what a day! My brain doesn’t function at all anymore.”
    The first two words of the first sentence, together with a noun, are a common way to sigh and exclaim something. Literally, the first word means “joke,” but in this context it’s emphasizing how awful or good something has been. Also, it’s relatively common in Finland to say one’s brain is not working anymore when one is very tired.

    2- Kauhea nälkä.

    Then comes the phrase - “So hungry…”
    The first word means “terrible,” and the second word means “hunger” or “famine.” This is an often heard phrase from someone who is very hungry. You can also replace the second word with another noun, for example “fatigue”, “väsymys”, to express how terribly tired you are.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Pistä Juha kokkaamaan ja antamaan sinulle niska-hartiahieronta!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Make Juha cook and give you a neck and shoulder massage!”
    Use this suggestion to show you’re caring about the poster’s predicament.

    2- Palautumisia! Yritä ottaa rauhallisemmin.

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Try to recover! Try to take it easy.”
    These are also warmhearted, well-intended advice to the poster.

    3- Älä valita vaan tee ruokaa.

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t complain, just make some food.”
    Use this expression to joke with the poster in a somewhat bossy, insulting way. Probably best reserved only for people who knows you well enough to understand you’re joking.

    4- Huomenna otat kevyemmin.

    Her boyfriend, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Tomorrow you’re going to take it (more) lightly.”
    Use this expression to show you care about the poster’s situation, and to make a positive, supportive suggestion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • aivot: “brains”
  • toimia: “to function”
  • ollenkaan: “at all”
  • kauhea: “terrible”
  • nälkä: “hunger”
  • Palautumisia!: “Try to recover!”
  • ottaa rauhallisesti: “to take it easy”
  • ottaa kevyesti: “to take it lightly”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Finnish! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Finnish

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Finnish.

    Juha suffers a serious injury, posts an image of himself in a cast, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Nyt kävi näin. Ainakin neljä viikkoa kipsissä. Aika parantaa haavat, eikö niin?
    “So, this happened. At least four weeks in a cast. Time heals wounds, doesn’t it?”

    1- Nyt kävi näin. Ainakin neljä viikkoa kipsissä.

    First is an expression meaning - “So this happened. At least four weeks in a cast.”
    The first sentence says something significant has happened, in a relatively ironic, dryly humorous way. Literally, it means “now this happened”.

    2- Aika parantaa haavat, eikö niin?

    Then comes the phrase - “Time heals wounds, doesn’t it?.”
    The first part is a common and traditional proverb, literally meaning that all healing takes time. It can be used when something bad has happened to someone, to comfort them and to remind that things will get better gradually.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hurjannäköistä!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Looks fierce!”
    Use this expression to show your sympathy with modern slang. It means that the injury looks serious.

    2- Voi itku! Sattuuko paljon?

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Oh no! Does it hurt much?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling sorry for the poster, and want to know more details.

    3- Mitä möhlit tällä kertaa?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “So what did you blunder this time?”
    Use this expression to be sympathetic in a slightly sarcastic, humorous way. Again, probably best not to use this with someone who doesn’t know your style well.

    4- Harmin paikka. Nyt vain paljon lepoa!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Such a pity. Now just rest a lot!”
    Use this expression to show sympathy and to make a supportive suggestion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nyt: “now”
  • aika: “hour, time”
  • parantaa: “to heal”
  • haava: “wound”
  • sattua: “to hurt”
  • möhliä: “to blunder”
  • tällä kertaa: “this time”
  • lepo: “rest”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Finnish

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Anne feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Ihan kamala keli! Piti ajaa kieli keskellä suuta.
    “Just horrible weather! I had to drive super careful.”

    1- Ihan kamala keli!

    First is an expression meaning “Just horrible weather!”
    The second word means “terrible” or “horrible,” and the third word means “weather”. The first word is an adverb meaning “right” or “quite”. Here it underlines just how terrible the weather is.

    2- Piti ajaa kieli keskellä suuta.

    Then comes the phrase - “I had to drive super careful”.
    This sentence literally means “I had to drive with my tongue in the middle of my mouth.” This is an expression of that means that you really have to pay attention, concentrate on something, and be very careful.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Onneksi olet ehjänä perillä.

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Luckily you made it home in one piece.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling grateful about the poster’s safety.

    2- Hui! Onneksi pääsit turvallisesti kotiin! Minä lensin jo aamulla nenälleni.

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Yikes! Fortunately, you got home safely! I fell flat on my face already in the morning…”
    Use this expression to show empathy with the poster, and share a personal detail too.

    3- Täydellinen sää harjoitella jäällä ajamista.

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “It’s the perfect weather to practice driving on ice.”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation by sharing information.

    4- Olkaahan kaikki varovaisia tänään liikenteessä.

    Her boyfriend, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Please be careful in traffic today, everyone.”
    Use this expression to remind everyone of something for their own safety.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kamala: “horrible”
  • keli: “weather”
  • kieli: “tongue”
  • onneksi: “fortunately”
  • lentää nenälleen: “to fall flat on one’s face (lit. to fly on one’s nose)”
  • harjoitella: “to practice”
  • varovainen: “careful”
  • liikenne: “traffic”
  • How would you comment in Finnish when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Finnish

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Juha changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Anne, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Askel eteenpäin. Tässä on se kauniimpi osapuoli.
    “One step forward. Here is my more beautiful half.”

    1- Askel eteenpäin.

    First is an expression meaning “One step forward. .”
    The first word means “step,” and the second word means “forward.” You can use this expression when you’ve made progress with something.

    2- Tässä on se kauniimpi osapuoli.

    Then comes the phrase - “Here is the more beautiful half..”
    This is a relatively common phrase in Finland, as Finnish men sometimes refer to their girlfriends or wives as being the more beautiful person of the couple.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hienoa! Onnea!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Great! Congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show your enthusiasm about the news, and congratulate the couple in a traditional way.

    2- No vihdoinkin!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Well finally!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling playful and frivolous, but positive about the news.

    3- Tätä on odotettu… Onnea ihanat!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “This was expected… Congratulations lovelies!”
    Use this expression to show your approval of the couple’s new status, and congratulate them using a term of endearment.

    4- Kiitos kaikille ja kiitos kulta kehuista!

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you, everyone. And thank you, sweety, for the praise!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling appreciative of the posters’ comments, as well as your partner’s praise.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • askel: “step”
  • eteenpäin: “forward”
  • kaunis: “beautiful”
  • vihdoinkin: “finally”
  • odottaa: “to wait”
  • ihana: “lovely”
  • kulta: “sweety”
  • kehu: “praise”
  • What would you say in Finnish when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Finnish

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Finnish.

    Anne is getting married today, so she leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Yllätys!! Karkasimme vihille!
    “Surprise!! We eloped!”

    1- Yllätys!!

    First is an expression meaning “Surprise!!”
    You can use this word in any kind of situation where you want to share unexpected news.

    2- Karkasimme vihille!

    Then comes the phrase - “We eloped!”
    The first word literally means “we escaped.” The second word means “to marriage.” Therefore, this phrase can be used when someone has gotten married without telling anyone.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Olen virallisesti maailman onnellisin mies.

    Her husband, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “I’m officially the happiest man in the world.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling happy with your marriage partner.

    2- Ette ole tosissanne!! Onnea hurjasti!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “You’re not serious!! Huge congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling surprised by the news, but are still excited and pleased about it.

    3- Ihanaa! Kaunis morsian, upea puku ja komea sulhanen!

    Her friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Wonderful! Beautiful bride, gorgeous dress, and handsome groom!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling appreciative and happy for the bride about the news, as well as the groom’s appearance.

    4- Ohhoh! Lämpöiset onnittelut minultakin!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Wow! Warm congratulations from me as well!”
    This is also an expression of happy surprise, and a more traditional congratulation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • yllätys: “surprise”
  • karata vihille: “to elope”
  • virallisesti: “officially”
  • onnellinen: “happy”
  • olla tosissaan: “to be serious”
  • upea: “gorgeous”
  • morsian: “bride”
  • sulhanen: “groom”
  • How would you respond in Finnish to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Finnish

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Finnish.

    Juha finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Vauvauutisia! Isimies on onnellinen!

    “Baby news! Daddyman is happy!”

    1- Vauvauutisia!

    First is an expression meaning “Baby news!”
    This word is comprised of two parts, the first one meaning “a baby” and the second one meaning “news.” This word can be used when someone is announcing a pregnancy or the arrival of a new baby.

    2- Isimies on onnellinen!

    Then comes the phrase - “Daddyman is happy!”
    The first word in this sentence, meaning “daddyman”, is a neologism. It affectionately or ironically describes a man who’s a father, and is a quite popular word in social media, especially for people in their 20s or 30s.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Onpa mahtava uutinen heti viikon aluksi, paljon onnea!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Such great news right at the beginning of the week, congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling very happy about the news, and congratulate the expecting parents.

    2- Olen niin kovin onnellinen teidän puolestanne. Halauksia!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “I am so very happy for you. Hugs!”
    Another expression of happiness about the news.

    3- Onnea murut!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations sweeties!”
    This is a short congratulation, using a term of endearment.

    4- Vau, onnea teille!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Wow, congratulations to you!”
    As in the previous lesson, this expression of happy surprise and a congratulation is appropriate in this situation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vauva: “baby”
  • isi: “daddy”
  • onnellinen: “happy”
  • uutinen: “news”
  • kovin: “very”
  • teidän puolestanne: “on your behalf (pl.)”
  • halaus: “hug”
  • muru: “sweety”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Finnish Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Finnish.

    Anne plays with her baby, posts an image of the cutie pie, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Mammalla on unet vähissä, mutta se ei haittaa kun vauva on tämmöinen rakkauspakkaus.
    “Mama doesn’t get enough sleep, but it doesn’t matter because the baby is such a love package.”

    1- Mammalla on unet vähissä

    First is an expression meaning “Mama doesn’t get enough sleep.”
    Literally, this sentence means “Mama has a short supply of sleep”. Sleep, dreams, and so on are sometimes treated as substances in the Finnish language. It’s something you can have a lot or little of. Modern mothers also sometimes playfully refer to themselves with the word “mama.”

    2- mutta se ei haittaa kun vauva on tämmöinen rakkauspakkaus.

    Then comes the phrase - “but it doesn’t matter as the baby is such a love package..”
    The last word, “love package”, is a commonly-used, playful word in social media to describe someone sweet, cute, and lovable. Usually it’s used in reference to babies, little children, or pets.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Voi kun pääsisin pian halailemaan häntä! Niin suloinen pikkuinen.

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Oh I wish I could come and cuddle him soon! Such a sweet little one.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling very warmhearted and appreciative of the baby.

    2- Ihan Juhan näköinen!

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “He looks just like Juha!”
    Use this expression to share your opinion about who the baby resembles.

    3- Voi miten suloinen hän on.

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Oh how cute he is.”
    Use this expression to indicate that you also feel positive about the baby.

    4- Apua miten söpö!

    Her friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “(Help) how cute!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling almost overwhelmed by the baby’s charms.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • mamma: “mama, mamma”
  • uni: “sleep”
  • vähissä: “in short supply”
  • tämmöinen: “of this short”
  • suloinen: “cute, sweet”
  • pikkuinen: “the little one”
  • jonkun näköinen: “looking like someone”
  • söpö: “cute”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Finnish! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Finnish Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Juha goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Pitkästä aikaa juhlat koko suvun kesken!
    “A party with the whole family after (such) a long time!”

    1- Pitkästä aikaa

    First is an expression meaning “After a long time.”
    This expression means “after a long time” or “long time no see.” This is a bit of a strange phrase, as the first word is the elative case of the word “long,” and the second word is the partitive case of the word “time”. Therefore, literally the expression would be “from the long time.” This expression can be used whenever something is happening after a long pause - be it meeting other people and greeting them with this expression, or simply explaining that you’re going somewhere after a long time.

    2- juhlat koko suvun kesken

    Then comes the phrase - “a party with the whole family.”
    The first word means “party”; the second word means “whole”; the third word in this context means “the extended family” - i.e. aunts, uncles, etc., - and the last word in this context means “amongst.” In some cases, the last word can mean “midst” or “inter-” something.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hauskoja juhlia!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Have a fun party!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- Onpa teillä paljon ruokaa! Tuokaa mulle ylimääräiset!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “My, how much food you have! Bring me the extra!”
    Use these phrases to be humorous and want to participate in the conversation with funny suggestions.

    3- Onneksi pääsin mukaan. Mukava tutustua sukulaisiisi!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Luckily I could come too. It’s nice to get to know your relatives!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling good about being part of the celebrations.

    4- Suku on pahin, vai miten se meni?

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Family is the worst, or how did it go?”
    Use this expression to use sarcasm in a humorous way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pitkästä aikaa: “after a long time”
  • suku: “family”
  • kesken: “amongst”
  • ruoka: “food”
  • ylimääräinen: “extra”
  • onneksi: “luckily”
  • tutustua: “to meet, to get to know”
  • pahin: “worst”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Finnish

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Finnish about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Anne waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Aikainen lintu madon nappaa. Tänään oli aikainen herätys, mutta tämä on sen arvoista!
    “Early bird catches the worm. It was an early wake-up today, but this is worth it!”

    1- Aikainen lintu madon nappaa.

    First is an expression meaning “Early bird catches the worm..”
    This traditional proverb is also well-known in Finland. The first word means “early”; the second word means “bird”; the third word is the genitive case of the word “worm”, and the fourth word is the verb “to catch” in the third person singular. You can use this proverb in situations where you have to wake up early or go somewhere early in order to achieve something.

    2- Tänään oli aikainen herätys,

    Then comes the phrase - “It was an early wake-up today”.
    The first word means “today”, the second word is the past tense of the verb ‘to be’, the third word means “early” and the fourth word is “wake-up”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Oho, minne matka?

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Wow, where are you traveling to?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious about the poster’s plans for holiday.

    2- Hyi, matoja - ei kiitos. Mutta ihanaa reissua!!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Ugh, worms - no thanks. But have a wonderful trip!!”
    Use this expression to be funny, but also positive.

    3- Nauti!

    Her friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    4- Koita nukkua lentokoneessa.

    Her supervisor, Hannu, uses an expression meaning - “Try to sleep on the plane.”
    Use this expression to give advice you think the poster might find valuable.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • aikainen: “early”
  • herätys: “wake-up”
  • sen arvoinen: “worth it”
  • minne: “where”
  • matka: “road, way, journey”
  • hyi: “ugh”
  • koittaa: “to try”
  • lentokone: “airplane”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Finnish!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Finnish

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Finnish phrases!

    Juha finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Löysin kotimaisen design-klassikon vitosella kirppikseltä. Ei paha.
    “I found a domestically designed classic for a fiver at a flea market. Not bad.”

    1- Löysin kotimaisen design-klassikon vitosella kirppikseltä.

    First is an expression meaning “I found a domestically designed classic for a fiver at a flea market..”
    People, especially young adults, in Finland love to treasure hunt in flea markets. Domestic design classics found at flea markets are considered to be the ultimate treasures! The second to last word here is kind of a nickname for five euros, and the last word is a commonly used abbreviation for “flea market.”

    2- Ei paha.

    Then comes the phrase - “Not bad.”
    A commonly used expression, especially among young adults and young men, “not bad” is used to express subdued and cool satisfaction and contentment. Sometimes it’s used with a sarcastic or ironic tone.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ihana aarre!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “A wonderful treasure!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the find.

    2- Vautsi! Tuo valaisin oli tosi edullinen löytö!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Wow! That lamp was a very affordable find!”
    Another optimistic, positive comment.

    3- Vanhaa roinaa…

    His nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Old junk…”
    Use this expression to joke a bit with the poster, and/or if you are good friends and know one another well.

    4- Vanhemmillani on ollut samanlainen valaisin. Arvokas esine!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “My parents had a similar lamp. A valuable object!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • löytää: “to find”
  • kotimainen: “domestic”
  • design-klassikko: “design classic”
  • vitonen: “fiver”
  • kirppis: “flea market”
  • aarre: “treasure”
  • edullinen: “affordable”
  • roina: “junk”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Finnish

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Finnish, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Anne visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Pitkäaikainen haave toteutui tänään. Tämän lisäksi tiedossa aurinkoa, palmuja ja drinkkejä!
    “A long-time dream came true today. In addition to this, there will be sun, palm trees, and drinks!”

    1- Pitkäaikainen haave toteutui tänään.

    First is an expression meaning “A long-term dream came true today..”
    The first word is actually comprised of two parts, “long” and “time.” You can use this word to explain something has been going on for a long time.

    2- Tämän lisäksi tiedossa aurinkoa, palmuja ja drinkkejä!

    Then comes the phrase - “In addition to this, there will be sun, palm trees and drinks!”
    Autumn and winter in Finland is quite dark, long, and cold. Therefore, Finns love to travel to somewhere warm and sunny during these seasons. It’s common to brag about holiday leisures on social media. It’s also common to see other Finns reminding the holiday-goers about the miserable weather back home.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hieno paikka ja hieno kuva!

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “A great place and a great picture!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling appreciative of the poster’s photo and their destination.

    2- Ja täällä sataa räntää.

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “And it’s sleeting here.”
    Use this expression to share information about your own weather, if it’s snowing.

    3- Älä unohda tuliaisia!

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t forget souvenirs!”
    Use this expression if you expect a gift from the poster when they’re back.

    4- Ensi kerralla minä tulen mukaan.

    Her husband, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Next time I’m coming with you.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling keen to join the poster on the next trip.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pitkäaikainen: “long-term”
  • haave: “dream”
  • toteutua: “to come true”
  • aurinko: “sun”
  • paikka: “place”
  • räntä: “sleet”
  • tuliainen: “souvenir”
  • ensi kerralla: “next time”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Finnish

    So you’re doing nothing, yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Finnish!

    Juha relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Viikonloppu alkaa rannalta. Kyllä nyt kelpaa.
    “The weekend begins at the beach. This will certainly do.”

    1- Viikonloppu alkaa rannalta.

    First is an expression meaning “The weekend begins at the beach..”
    For Finns, Friday is perhaps the most long-awaited day of the week. In summertime, many Finns head to beaches, parks, or their summerhouses right after work on Fridays to enjoy the lovely weather and relax.

    2- Kyllä nyt kelpaa.

    Then comes the phrase - “This will certainly do..”
    The last word of this sentence is a verb meaning “to pass muster.” This demotic phrase, even though it literally sounds modest, actually means something is exceptionally nice.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tulossa mahtava viikonloppu!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “It’s going to be an amazing weekend!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the weekend’s prospects.

    2- Mites huomenna? Menetkö taas rannalle? Voinko tulla mukaan?

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “How about tomorrow? Are you going to the beach again? Can I tag along?”
    Use these questions to discuss possible plans with the poster.

    3- Hieno paikka.

    His supervisor, Hannu, uses an expression meaning - “A fine place.”
    Use this just to comment on the destination.

    4- Mukavaa viikonloppua!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Have a nice weekend!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster a good weekend.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • viikonloppu: “weekend”
  • ranta: “beach “
  • kelvata: “to do, to be good enough”
  • mites: “how about (abbr.)”
  • mahtava: “amazing”
  • huomenna: “tomorrow”
  • hieno: “fine”
  • mukava: “nice”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Finnish When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Anne returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Oma koti kullan kallis! Ihanaa olla taas kotona.
    “Home sweet home! It’s wonderful to be back home again.”

    1- Oma koti kullan kallis!

    First is an expression meaning “Home sweet home!”
    Literally, this phrase means “own home is worthy of gold.” It’s a traditional proverb that’s well-known in Finland.

    2- Ihanaa olla taas kotona.

    Then comes the phrase - “It’s wonderful to be back home again…”
    Even though Finns love to travel, they also love to stay home. House parties and get-togethers at people’s houses are very common in Finland, as the home is a place for relaxing and enjoying.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tervetuloa takaisin!

    Her husband, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back!”
    Use this expression to make the poster feel welcome and at home from their trip.

    2- Toivottavasti oli kiva reissu.

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you had a nice trip.”
    Use this expression simply to partake in the conversation with positive comments. Sometimes this can be a good conversation starter too.

    3- Kiva että olet taas täällä!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “(It’s) nice that you’re here again!”
    Use this expression to share your positive feelings about the poster’s return from holiday.

    4- Missä tuliaiset?

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Where’s the souvenirs?”
    Use this expression in a joking manner, continuing the theme of expecting a gift from the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • oma: “own”
  • koti: “home”
  • kulta: “gold”
  • kallis: “dear”
  • tervetuloa: “welcome”
  • toivottavasti: “hopefully”
  • reissu: “trip”
  • kiva: “nice”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public holiday such as May Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Finnish

    It’s a public holiday and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Juha is attending a May Day picnic, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Vappupöytä koreana! Ullanlinnanmäellä ollaan!
    “(The) May Day table is dashing! We are at Ullanlinnanmäki!”

    1- Vappupöytä koreana!

    First is an expression meaning “May Day table is dashing!.”
    The first word is a combination of “May Day” - a popular spring festival on the 1st of May - and “table”. The word means the food offered at the festive May Day table. Having a festive picnic on the 1st of May is a tradition in Finland. The table isn’t always an actual table, but a blanket on the ground!

    The second word means “is dashing.” This expression is used especially when describing how abundant and versatile food is offered.

    2- Ullanlinnanmäellä ollaan!

    Then comes the phrase - “We are at Ullanlinnanmäki!.”
    The most popular place to gather for a May Day picnic is the Ullanlinnamäki hill in Kaivopuisto park in Helsinki. It’s also known by its nickname “Ullis”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hauskaa vappua!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Happy May Day!”
    This is the traditional May Day greeting.

    2- Säästäkää mulle nakkeja!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Please spare some wieners for me!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous, just to partake in the conversation. Unless you’re serious about the instruction that some wieners be saved for you!

    3- Ulliksella nähdään!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “See you at Ullis!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    4- Kohta nähdään. Tuon vappumunkkeja tullessani - ellen syö itse kaikkia!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “See you soon. I’m bringing May Day donuts with me - unless I eat all of them by myself!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vappupöytä: “May Day table”
  • korea: “dashing”
  • säästää: “to spare”
  • mulle: “for me (spoken lang.)”
  • nakki: “wiener”
  • vappu: “May Day”
  • kohta: “soon”
  • vappumunkki: “May Day donut”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    May Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Finnish

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Anne goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Yllätyssynttärit! Kiitos kaikki ihanat!
    “A surprise birthday party! Thank you all, you lovelies!”

    1- Yllätyssynttärit!

    First is an expression meaning “A surprise birthday party!.”
    This word is a combination of two words: “surprise” and “birthday party”. You can combine the first part, “suprise”, with other nouns to create a word that describes something being unexpected.

    2- Kiitos kaikki ihanat!

    Then comes the phrase - “Thank you all you lovelies!”
    Especially young Finnish people, and females in particular, refer to their friends with numerous terms of endearment. The last word of this phrase is one of those. In this case, the adjective “lovely” has become a noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Voi miten ihanaa! Hyvää syntymäpäivää!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Oh how wonderful! Happy Birthday!”
    Use this expression to congratulate the poster.

    2- Paljon onnea vielä, kaunotar!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations again, beauty!”
    Use this expression to be supportive and loving.

    3- Sinä vain kaunistut vuosi vuodelta!

    Her husband, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “You are becoming more beautiful year by year!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling very appreciative of your partner’s looks.

    4- Ällöttävää. Onneksi ei tarvinnut osallistua.

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Yucky. Fortunately I didn’t have to participate.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling cynical, hopefully in a joking manner.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • yllätys: “surprise”
  • synttärit: “birthday”
  • kiitos: “thank you”
  • ihana: “lovely”
  • syntymäpäivä: “birthday”
  • kaunotar: “beauty”
  • kaunistua: “to become beautiful”
  • ällöttävä: “yucky”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Finnish

    Impress your friends with your Finnish New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Juha celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Poks ja kippis! Hyvää uutta vuotta ystävät!
    “Pop and cheers! Happy New Year, friends!”

    1- Poks ja kippis!

    First is an expression meaning “Pop and cheers!”
    The first word is an onomatopoeic word describing the sound of a champagne bottle opening. The second word is the Finnish equivalent for “cheers”. Opening a bottle of sparkling wine or champagne at midnight on New Year’s eve is a tradition for the majority of Finnish people.

    2- Hyvää uutta vuotta ystävät!

    Then comes the phrase - “Happy New Year friends!”
    This is a very common way to wish Happy New Year to your friends. The first three words, “good,” “new,” and “year,” are all in the partitive case. The last word means “friends”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Onnellista uutta vuotta!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling friendly.

    2- Hauskaa uutta vuotta!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year!”
    Use this expression to greet people on this day in a traditional way.

    3- Kippis uudelle vuodelle!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers for the New Year!”
    This is a more informal New Year greeting and wish.

    4- Hyvää uutta vuotta! Teitkö uuden vuoden lupauksia?

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year! Did you make any New Year’s resolutions?”
    Use these phrases when you want to start a conversation about New Year resolutions.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kippis: “cheers”
  • hyvä: “good”
  • uusi vuosi: “New Year”
  • hauska: “fun”
  • ystävä: “friend”
  • tehdä: “to make”
  • uuden vuoden lupaus: “New Year’s resolution”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Finnish

    What will you say in Finnish about Christmas?

    Anne celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Hyvää joulua ystävät ja kiitos ihanista joulukorteista! Itse tuin joulukorttirahoilla tänä vuonna saimaannorppia!
    “Merry Christmas friends and thank you for the lovely Christmas cards! This year I supported the Saimaa Ringed Seals with the Christmas Card money instead!”

    1- Hyvää joulua ystävät ja kiitos ihanista joulukorteista!

    First is an expression meaning “Merry Christmas friends and thank you for the lovely Christmas cards!”
    It is an old tradition to send Christmas greeting cards to friends and family members in Finland. Recently, it has become more popular to donate the money normally spent on Christmas cards to some charity instead, and send one’s Christmas wishes through social media.

    2- Itse tuin joulukorttirahoilla tänä vuonna saimaannorppia!

    Then comes the phrase - “This year I supported the Saimaa Ringed Seal with the Christmas Card money instead…”
    The Saimaa ringed seal is one of the most endangered animals in the world. The only existing population of these seals is found in Lake Saimaa, Finland. Recently many Finns have shown the urge to protect these animals through donations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lepoa ja rauhaa, niin sinulle, Juhalle, kuin saimaannorpillekin!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Rest and tranquility, to you, Juha, as well as the Saimaa Ringed Seals!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster, as well as the seals a peaceful and relaxed Christmas.

    2- Hyvää joulua!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas!”
    This is the traditional Christmas wish.

    3- Koska saan joululahjani?

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “When will I get my Christmas present?”
    Use this expression to be funny in a sarcastic way.

    4- Rentouttavia joulunpyhiä!

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Have a relaxing Christmas holiday!”
    This is a wish for a restful holiday.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Hyvää joulua: “Merry Christmas”
  • joulukortti: “Christmas card”
  • joulukorttirahat: “Christmas card money”
  • saimaannorppa: “Saimaa Ringed Seal”
  • lepo: “rest”
  • rauha: “tranquility”
  • joululahja: “Christmas present”
  • rentouttava: “relaxing”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Finnish

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Finnish phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Juha celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Toinen hääpäivä, tällä kertaa auringon alla. Ja vauvan kanssa!
    “The second wedding anniversary, this time under the sun. And with a baby!”

    1- Toinen hääpäivä

    First is an expression meaning “second wedding anniversary.”
    The second word, meaning “anniversary” is actually comprised of two words: “wedding” and “day”.

    2- auringon alla

    Then comes the phrase - “under the sun.”
    This phrase, “under the sun,” is often used when someone has traveled somewhere abroad where it’s hot and sunny.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ihanaa lomaa ja hääpäivää koko porukalle!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Have a wonderful holiday and wedding anniversary the whole lot of you!”
    This is a warm and friendly wish for the couple on their anniversary.

    2- Oltiin samassa paikassa pari vuotta sitten. Mahtavaa lomaa!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “We were at that same place a couple of years ago. Have an awesome holiday!”
    Use this expression to share some personal information, and wish the couple a good break.

    3- Aurinko polttaa.

    His nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “The sun burns.”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation with a negative comment, trying to be funny. It’s anybody’s guess whether or not the comment will be considered humorous.

    4- Mukavaa hääpäivää! Kuinka kauan olette matkalla?

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Have a nice wedding anniversary! How long will you be traveling?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and want to know more information.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • hääpäivä: “wedding day, anniversary”
  • tällä kertaa: “this time”
  • vauva: “baby”
  • kanssa: “with”
  • loma: “vacation”
  • porukka: “lot”
  • polttaa: “to burn”
  • kuinka kauan: “How long”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Finnish! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Say Sorry in Finnish

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Finnish
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Finnish
    3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Finnish through FinnishPod101


    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Finnish

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Finnish. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Olen pahoillani.
    I’m sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Finnish or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Haluaisin pyytää anteeksi.
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Finnish. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Pyydän vilpittömästi anteeksi.
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    En tee sitä enää.
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Pidän huolen siitä, etten tee tätä virhettä uudelleen.
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    En tarkoittanut sitä.
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Se on minun syyni.
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Olen pahoillani siitä, että olen itsekäs.
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Toivottavasti annat minulle anteeksi.
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Otan täyden vastuun.
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Minun ei olisi pitänyt tehdä sitä.
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Anteeksi, että annan rahasi takaisin niin myöhään.
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Älä ole vihainen minulle.
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Anteeksi että olen myöhässä.
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Pyydän anteeksi, että olin sinulle ilkeä.
    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Finnish

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Finnish! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at FinnishPod101 about how to use the correct Finnish words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Finnish? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Finnish. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Finnish through FinnishPod101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! FinnishPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Finnish!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Finnish with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Finnish dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about FinnishPod101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Finnish teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Finnish word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Finnish level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Finnish, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in FinnishPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Finnish!

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    How to Introduce Yourself in Finnish: Break the Ice!

    Thumbnail

    How many non-Finnish people do you know who can speak Finnish? Probably not that many! That’s why, when you meet a Finn through work, at a party, or while traveling, you can really make a lasting impression when you know how to introduce yourself in Finnish!

    Most Finns—especially the younger generation—can speak English pretty well (According to Wikipedia, Finland ranks as the eighth country in the world in terms of English proficiency). However, if you know how to say even just a simple phrase like “My name is” in Finnish, you can break the ice much faster when you meet someone new!

    Log

    Table of Contents

    1. Start with a Greeting!
    2. How to Share Basic Information About Yourself
    3. How to Talk About What You Do
    4. How to Share More Details About Yourself
    5. A Few Cultural Notes
    6. How FinnishPod101 Can Help You Learn More about Introducing Yourself


    1. Start with a Greeting!

    First Encounter

    It’s always a good idea to start with a friendly greeting when you meet someone new. So let’s learn some common Finnish greetings.

    1- Greeting someone in formal and informal situations

    Are you going to a business lunch or meeting your partner’s parents for the first time? You can use the following Finnish greetings in any formal situation.

    • Hyvää huomenta.
      “Good morning.”
    • Hyvää päivää.
      “Good day.”
    • Hyvää iltaa.
      “Good evening.”

    In informal situations, you can greet someone with a casual “Hi.” Pick one of these three basic Finnish greetings:

    • Hei.
      “Hi.”
    • Moi.
      “Hi.”
    • Terve.
      “Hi.”

    2- Sinä or te?

    There are two versions of the pronoun “you” that you can use when you’re addressing someone in Finnish. Sinä is the informal singular “you,” and te is the singular “you” which can be used in formal situations and when you want to be extra polite. ( Note that te is also the plural “you.” ) There are no overly strict rules about which one to choose, so just go with these general guidelines and you’ll be fine!

    During more formal encounters—for example, when you meet a client—it’s a good idea to use the more formal word te when addressing the other person.

    In casual situations—for example, when talking to younger people or a good friend—use the more informal word sinä. Depending on where you are in Finland, you may also hear people say or sie instead of sinä!

    3- Shaking hands and making eye contact

    During greetings in Finnish, it’s common to shake hands when you meet someone for the first time. A Finnish handshake is typically brief and firm. Look the other person in the eye while you shake hands with them, and smile for an even greater impact!


    2. How to Share Some Basic Information About Yourself

    Countries

    Let’s move on to the basic questions and answers that are likely to come up during a self-introduction in Finnish.

    When asking a question, there’s a casual form and a formal form depending on who you’re addressing. We’ll cover both forms!

    1- What’s your name?

    This is almost certainly the very first question to come up in a conversation with a new acquaintance! So how do you ask someone’s name and how do you say “My name is,” in Finnish? Let’s find out!

    Casual:

    • Mikä sinun nimesi on?
      “What’s your name?”

    Formal:

    • Mikä teidän nimenne on?
      “What’s your name?”

    And this is how you can respond to the question:

    • Minun nimeni on Maija.
      “My name is Maija.”
    • Minä olen Sanna.
      “I am Sanna.”

    In formal situations, it’s typical to say your full name:

    • Minun nimeni on Maija Virtanen.
      “My name is Maija Virtanen.”

    And after you’ve learned each other’s names, you can say:

    • Hauska tavata!
      “It’s nice to meet you!”

    2- Where are you from?

    Talking About Yourself

    Your new Finnish acquaintance will probably wonder where you’re from! Here are some ways to talk about your home country and your nationality.

    Casual:

    • Mistä olet kotoisin?
      “Where are you from?”
    • Minkä maan kansalainen sinä olet?
      “What is your nationality?”

    Formal:

    • Mistä olette kotoisin?
      “Where are you from?”
    • Minkä maan kansalainen olette?
      “What is your nationality?”

    If you come from another country, you can answer like this:

    • Olen kotoisin Meksikosta.
      “I’m from Mexico.”
    • Olen meksikolainen.
      “I’m Mexican.”

    Look at this list of world countries in Finnish to find out how to write and pronounce the name of your home country.

    3- How old are you?

    Birthday Cake with Question Mark Candle

    Asking somebody about their age is usually fine among young people in Finland. In contrast, asking older women about their age may come across as tactless, so be cautious!

    Casual:

    • Kuinka vanha sinä olet?
      “How old are you?”

    Formal:

    • Kuinka vanha te olette?
      “How old are you?”

    Your answer can take one of the following forms:

    • Olen 18 vuotta vanha.
      “I’m 18 years old.”
    • Olen 30-vuotias.
      “I’m a 30-year-old.”
    • Olen 50.
      “I’m 50.”


    3. How to Talk About What You Do

    Introducing Yourself

    Are you a student? Do you work? Are you taking a gap year to see the world?! Learn how to talk about work, studies, and traveling with your new Finnish friends. These topics are bound to come up when you introduce yourself in Finnish and get to know people better.

    1- How to talk about traveling

    Are you on holiday in Finland? Lucky you! Here are some questions that may come up when you talk about visiting Finland for leisure.

    Casual:

    • Oletko lomalla?
      “Are you on holiday?”
    • Oletko matkalla Suomessa?
      “Are you traveling in Finland?”

    Formal:

    • Oletteko te lomalla?
      “Are you on holiday?”
    • Oletteko matkalla Suomessa?
      “Are you traveling in Finland?”

    You can answer like this:

    • Kyllä, olen lomalla.
      “Yes, I am on holiday.”
    • Kyllä, olen matkalla Suomessa.
      “Yes, I am traveling in Finland.”
    • Kyllä, olen.
      “Yes, I am.”
    • Kyllä.
      “Yes.”

    Here’s more useful vocabulary for travelers!

    2- Talking about your studies

    Did studies bring you to Finland, or are you a student back in your home country? Prepare to ask and answer questions about student life!

    Woman Taking Notes in Class

    Casual:

    • Oletko opiskelija?
      “Are you a student?”
    • Mitä sinä opiskelet?
      “What are you studying?”

    Formal:

    • Oletteko opiskelija?
      “Are you a student?”
    • Mitä opiskelette?
      “What are you studying?”

    Here are some ways to answer the above questions:

    • Olen opiskelija.
      “I am a student.”
    • Tulin Suomeen opiskelemaan.
      “I came to Finland to study.”
    • Olen vaihto-oppilas.
      “I’m an exchange student.”
    • Opiskelen kemiaa.
      “I’m studying chemistry.”

    Not a budding chemist? No problem. Look up other school subjects in Finnish here.

    3- Talking about your work

    Talking about work is very likely to come up in conversation when you’re getting to know someone in Finland!

    Casual:

    • Mikä on ammattisi?
      “What is your profession?”
    • Mitä teet työksesi?
      “What do you do for a living?”
    • Millä alalla olet töissä?
      “In which field do you work?”

    Formal:

    • Mikä on ammattinne?
      “What is your profession?”
    • Mitä teette työksenne?
      “What do you do for a living?”
    • Millä alalla olette töissä?
      “Where do you work?”

    And now for some answers to the above questions:

    • Olen insinööri.
      “I am an engineer.”
    • Työskentelen IT-alalla.
      “I work in IT.”

    For more Finnish vocabulary and audio recordings, check out this list of 20 Common Words for Occupations.


    4. Sharing More Details About Yourself

    By now, you know quite a bit about your new Finnish friend! But if the conversation is flowing, there’s a lot more to talk about.

    1- Talking about your family

    Family Running in Park Together

    Family is often very important to Finns, so it’s good to master a few key phrases about family and relationships in Finnish.

    Casual:

    • Kerro minulle perheestäsi.
      “Tell me about your family.”
    • Oletko naimisissa?
      “Are you married?”
    • Onko sinulla lapsia?
      “Do you have children?”
    • Onko sinulla sisaruksia?
      “Do you have siblings?”

    Formal:

    • Kertokaa minulle perheestänne.
      “Tell me about your family.”
    • Oletteko naimisissa?
      “Are you married?”
    • Onko teillä lapsia?
      “Do you have children?”
    • Onko teillä sisaruksia?
      “Do you have siblings?”

    Some possible answers include:

    • Kyllä, olen naimisissa.
      “Yes, I’m married.”
    • Ei, olen sinkku.
      “No, I’m single.”
    • Ei, olen eronnut.
      “No, I’m divorced.”
    • Ei, mutta minulla on poikaystävä/tyttöystävä.
      “No, but I have a boyfriend/girlfriend.”
    • Minulla on kaksi lasta.
      “I have two kids.”
    • Minulla on veli ja sisko.
      “I have a brother and a sister.”

    For more Finnish terms for family members, look at this handy vocabulary list.

    2- Talking about your hobbies

    You might say that you’ll learn far more about someone by discovering what they do for fun rather than work. So go ahead and ask someone what their favorite pastimes are!

    Casual:

    • Mitä sinä harrastat?
      “What are your hobbies?”
    • Mitä teet vapaa-ajallasi?
      “What do you do in your free time?”

    Formal:

    • Mitä te harrastatte?
      “What are your hobbies?”
    • Mitä teette vapaa-ajallanne?
      “What do you do in your free time?”

    Of course, the options are endless, but here are some possible responses:

    • Pelaan jalkapalloa.
      “I play soccer.”
    • Soitan kitaraa.
      “I play the guitar.”
    • Pidän lukemisesta.
      “I like reading.”

    Learn more Finnish words for various hobbies here.

    3- Talking about your pets

    Do you have a pet? Many Finns have pets and will enjoy talking about their own furry friends as well as yours!

    Casual:

    • Onko sinulla lemmikkiä?
      “Do you have a pet?”
    • Pidätkö eläimistä?
      “Do you like animals?”

    Formal:

    • Onko teillä lemmikkiä?
      “Do you have a pet?”
    • Pidättekö eläimistä?
      “Do you like animals?”

    Your answer could be:

    • Kyllä, minulla on koira.
      “Yes, I have a dog.”
    • Minulla on kissa.
      “I have a cat.”
    • Ei, minulla ei ole lemmikkiä, mutta pidän eläimistä.
      “No, I don’t have a pet, but I like animals.”

    What if your pet is a snake? Find more animal-related vocabulary here.

    4- How to say why you are learning Finnish

    Learning Finnish is certainly not as common as learning French or Spanish, so Finns will probably ask you about it!

    Casual:

    • Miksi opiskelet suomea?
      “Why are you learning Finnish?
    • Kuinka kauan olet opiskellut suomea?
      “How long have you been learning Finnish?”

    Formal:

    • Miksi opiskelette suomea?
      “Why are you learning Finnish?”
    • Kuinka kauan olette opiskellut suomea?
      “How long have you been learning Finnish?”

    And here are some possible answers:

    • Pidän suomen kielestä.
      “I like the Finnish language.”
    • Äitini/isäni/vaimoni/mieheni on suomalainen.
      “My mother/father/wife/husband is Finnish.”
    • Halusin matkustaa/asua Suomessa.
      “I wanted to travel/live in Finland.”
    • Olen opiskellut suomea kolme vuotta.
      “I’ve been learning Finnish for three years.”


    5. A Few Cultural Notes

    1- A note on ‘spoken language’ and ‘book language’

    Not to alarm you, but Finns often drop syllables to shorten words in casual situations! This is the difference between kirjakieli (book language) and the more casual puhekieli (spoken language).

    Contrast this to what you’ve learned about asking and answering the question “What is your name?” in Finnish.

    In “spoken language,” someone might say:

    • Mikä sun nimi on?
      “What’s your name?”
    • Mun nimi on Esa.
      “My name is Esa.”
    • Mä oon Antti.
      “I am Antti.”

    Learn more about colloquial Finnish by checking out this Wikipedia article.

    The key is to be aware of it, but not to worry about it! You can always ask someone to clarify or to repeat themselves:

    • Anteeksi, en ymmärtänyt.
      “Sorry, I didn’t understand.”
    • Voisitko sanoa sen uudestaan?
      “Could you say it again?”

    2- Finns and small talk

    Women Chatting in Kitchen

    You may have heard that Finns are somewhat reserved and not very talkative. There’s some truth to it; Finns tend to be comfortable with silence and won’t typically rush to fill in gaps in a conversation with chitchat! However, you’ll also find that Finns are warm and good-humored people when you get to know them.

    There aren’t any obvious taboo subjects that you need to avoid in Finland. It’s usually fine to talk about things like religion and politics, although you may want to get started with other topics first!

    Learn more about the Finnish culture at This is Finland.


    6. How FinnishPod101 Can Help You Feel Confident About Introducing Yourself in Finnish

    Congratulations, you’ve now learned the basics of introducing yourself in Finnish and have a hang of the most common Finnish language greetings! We hope you feel confident in going out there and putting your new skills to use. Whether you’re meeting Finns through work or leisure, you can be sure that your efforts to speak to them in their own language will be appreciated!

    If you want more help with grammar and pronunciation, FinnishPod101 is your one-stop destination for a wide range of free language resources. Why not start with 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself to reinforce what you’ve learned so far?

    And if you’re serious about mastering the language and becoming fluent in Finnish, our MyTeacher learning program will take your skills to the next level!

    Before you go, practice what you’ve learned by writing a short introductory paragraph about yourself in Finnish. We look forward to your comments and learning more about you!

    Log

    How to Celebrate Easter in Finland

    The Monday after Easter (Easter Monday) is Finland’s largest celebration during the Easter week. It’s a day of Finnish Easter pudding and more delicious traditional Finnish Easter food. However, it’s also a day of great religious significance for Finland’s Christian population. From its more religious celebrations to Easter witches, Easter in Finland is a delight!

    Learn about Finland Easter traditions and more information about Easter in Finland with FinnishPod101.com! We hope to make learning about Finnish Easter both fun and informative; after all, cultural knowledge is a vital aspect of learning any language! So let’s get started.

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    1. What is Easter Monday in Finland?

    Easter, which is celebrated in-between March and April in Finland, is the oldest and most important Christian holiday.

    Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus, but many Easter traditions of the Finns were originally pagan and are associated with the longer days. Easter week, which is also known as Silent Week, starts with Palm Sunday. The Easter holidays consist of Good Friday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday.

    2. When is Easter Monday?

    Daffodil Against White Background

    The date of Easter Monday in Finland varies from year to year. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

    • 2019: April 22
    • 2020: April 13
    • 2021: April 5
    • 2022: April 18
    • 2023: April 10
    • 2024: April 1
    • 2025: April 21
    • 2026: April 6
    • 2027: March 29
    • 2028: April 17

    3. Reading Practice: How is Celebrated?

    Large Festive Dinner

    How is Easter celebrated in Finland? Read the Finnish text below to find out (and find the English translation directly below it)!

    Palmusunnuntaina lapset pukeutuvat pääsiäisnoidiksi ja lähtevät naapurustoon virpomaan, mukanaan koristelemansa värikkäät pajunoksat. Virpoja toivottaa onnea ja terveyttä pajunoksia heiluttamalla ja lausumalla samaan aikaan virpomislorun. Palkaksi pienet noidat saavat yleensä suklaamunia tai muita makeisia. Koristellut pajunoksat symboloivat palmusunnuntain palmunlehviä ja kevään saapumista. Pajunkissoja ja koivunoksia laitetaan myös kodeissa maljakkoon esille, sekä rairuohoa kasvatetaan kevään ja elämän juhlistamiseksi.

    Mämmi on kaikista perinteisin suomalainen pääsiäisherkku. Se on imellettyä, makeaa ruispuuroa, joka valmistetaan ruismaltaasta ja ruisjauhoista. Mämmi tarjoillaan yleensä kuohukerman, maidon tai vaniljajäätelön kanssa. Pasha puolestaan on rahkajälkiruoka, joka on levinnyt suomalaisten pääsiäispöytiin ortodoksien perinteestä. Pääsiäiseen kuuluvat myös pieniä leluja sisältävät suklaamunat ja pääsiäisrakeet. Suolaisia herkkuja ovat erilaiset lammas- ja kalaruoat, verimakkara ja uunijuusto.

    Aiemmin uskottiin, että juuri pääsiäisenä hyvät ja pahat voimat taistelevat keskenään. Savun ja kipinöiden uskottiin karkottavan noitia ja pahoja henkiä, joten pääsiäislauantaina sytytettiin suuria rovioita, eli pääsiäiskokkoja.

    On Palm Sunday, children dress up as Easter witches and go around the neighborhood to do virpominen, carrying colorful willow branches they have decorated themselves. The person conducting the virpominen, known as the virpoja, gives wishes of happiness and good health while waving the willow branches, and reciting a rhyme called virpomisloru, to the receiver. As a reward, the little witches usually receive chocolate eggs or other sweets. The embellished willow branches symbolize the palm leaves from Palm Sunday and the arrival of spring. Willow catkins and birch twigs are also placed in a vase in homes, and Easter rye grass is grown to celebrate spring and life.

    Mämmi is the most traditional Finnish Easter delicacy. It is malted, sweet rye porridge which is prepared from rye malts and rye flour. Mämmi is usually served with whipped cream, milk, or vanilla ice cream. Pasha, in turn, is a curd dessert that has spread to Finnish Easter tables from the Orthodox tradition. Chocolate eggs that contain small toys and Easter drops are also a part of Easter. Savory delicacies include different kinds of lamb and fish dishes, blood sausage, and baked cheese.

    It was previously believed that during Easter, good and evil forces would fight each other. Smoke and sparks were believed to expel witches and evil spirits, so large stakes and Easter bonfires were lit on Easter Saturday.

    4. Additional Information

    Do you know any other names the “Holy Week” can go by?
    Holy Week is also known as a Silent Week or Torment Week, and each day has its own special name, Palm Sunday, Beam Monday, Holy Tuesday, Holy Wednesday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday.

    5. Must-know Finnish Vocab for Easter Monday

    Purple Easter eggs in Ryegrass

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Easter Monday in Finland!

    • Tipu — “Chick”
    • Kristinusko — “Christianity”
    • Toinen pääsiäispäivä — “Easter Monday”
    • Ilmestyä — “Appear”
    • Opetuslapsi — “Disciple”
    • Vapaapäivä — “Day off”
    • Juhla-ateria — “Festive dinner
    • Narsissi — “Daffodil”
    • Rairuoho — “Ryegrass
    • Koivunoksa — “Birch twig”
    • Ylösnousemus — “Resurrection”

    To hear each word pronounced, check out our Finnish Easter Monday vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    What do you think about the Finnish celebration of Easter? Are Easter celebrations similar in your country, or different? Let us know in the comments!

    To learn even more about Finnish culture and the language, visit us at FinnishPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community to discuss lessons with fellow Finnish learners. You can also take advantage of our MyTeacher program, and learn Finnish with your own personal teacher, by upgrading to a Premium Plus account!

    All of your efforts will soon reap rewards, and you’ll be speaking like a native in no time! And we’ll be here to teach you and support you all the way there! Best wishes and happy Easter (be sure to enjoy some Finnish chocolate Easter eggs for us)!

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    How to Say I Love You in Finnish - Romantic Word List

    Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Finnish could be just what you need to find it.

    Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Finnish partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At FinnishPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Finnish lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Finnish dating easy for you.

    Table of Contents

    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
    4. Finnish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
    5. Finnish Quotes about Love
    6. Marriage Proposal Lines
    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
    8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Finnish Faster?

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

    So, you have met your Finnish love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Finnish word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Finnish date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

    Finnish Date Phrases

    Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

    • Haluaisitko mennä ulos syömään kanssani?

    The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Finnish is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

    Are you free this weekend?

    • Oletko vapaa tänä viikonloppuna?

    This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

    Would you like to hang out with me?

    • Haluaisitko hengailla kanssani?

    You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

    What time shall we meet tomorrow?

    • Mihin aikaan tapaisimme huomenna?

    Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

    Where shall we meet?

    • Missä tapaisimme?

    You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

    You look great.

    • Näytät hyvältä.

    A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

    You are so cute.

    • Olet niin söpö.

    If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

    What do you think of this place?

    • Mitä mieltä olet tästä paikasta?

    This another good conversation starter. Show off your Finnish language skills!

    Can I see you again?

    • Voinko tavata sinut uudelleen?

    So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

    Shall we go somewhere else?

    • Mentäisiinkö jonnekin muualle?

    If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

    I know a good place.

    • Tiedän hyvän paikan.

    Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

    I will drive you home.

    • Ajan sinut kotiin.

    If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

    That was a great evening.

    • Se oli hieno ilta.

    This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

    When can I see you again?

    • Milloin voin nähdä sinut uudestaan?

    If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

    I’ll call you.

    • Soitan sinulle.

    Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

    You learned all the Finnish phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Finnish below!

    Date Ideas in Finnish

    museum

    • museo

    If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

    candlelit dinner

    • kynttiläillallinen

    A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

    go to the zoo

    • mennä eläintarhaan

    This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

    go for a long walk

    • mennä pitkälle kävelylle

    Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

    go to the opera

    • mennä oopperaan

    This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

    go to the aquarium

    • mennä merimaailmaan

    Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

    walk on the beach

    • kävellä rannalla

    This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

    have a picnic

    • pitää piknik

    If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

    cook a meal together

    • laittaa ateria yhdessä

    If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

    have dinner and see a movie

    • illastaa ja katsoa elokuva

    This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

    Valentine's Day Words in Finnish

    Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Finnish - think how impressed your date will be!

    4. Finnish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

    So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Finnish yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Finnish? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Finnish love on this special day!

    Valentine's Day Words in Finnish

    I love you.

    • Rakastan sinua.

    Saying ‘I love you’ in Finnish carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

    You mean so much to me.

    • Merkitset minulle niin paljon.

    This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

    Will you be my Valentine?

    • Olisitko minun ystävänpäivän rakas?

    With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

    You’re so beautiful.

    • Olet niin kaunis.

    If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Finnish, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

    I think of you as more than a friend.

    • Ajattelen sinua enemmän kuin ystävänä.

    Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Finnish dating culture.

    A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

    • Sata sydäntä ei ole tarpeeksi kuljettamaan kaikki rakkauteni sinulle.

    You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

    Love is just love. It can never be explained.

    • Rakkaus on vain rakkautta. Sitä ei voi koskaan selittää.

    If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

    You’re so handsome.

    • Olet niin komea.

    Ladies, this phrase lets your Finnish love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

    I’ve got a crush on you.

    • Olen ihastunut sinuun.

    If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

    You make me want to be a better man.

    • Saat minut haluamaan olla parempi mies.

    Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Finnish girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

    Let all that you do be done in love.

    • Olkoon kaikki mitä teet tehtävä rakastuneena.

    We hope.

    You are my sunshine, my love.

    • Olet päivänsäteeni, rakkaani.

    A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

    Words can’t describe my love for you.

    • Sanat eivät riitä kuvaamaan rakkauttani sinua kohtaan.

    Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

    We were meant to be together.

    • Meidät oli tarkoitettu yhteen.

    This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

    If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

    • Jos ajattelit jotakuta lukiessasi tätä, olet varmasti rakastunut.

    Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

    5. Finnish Quotes about Love

    Finnish Love Quotes

    You’re a love champ! You and your Finnish lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Finnish that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

    6. Marriage Proposal Lines

    Finnish Marriage Proposal Lines

    Wow. Your Finnish lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Finnish custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

    Finnish Break-Up Lines

    Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Meidän täytyy puhua.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Kyse ei ole sinusta. Vaan minusta.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Finnish lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • En vain ole valmis tällaiseen suhteeseen.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Ollaan vain ystäviä.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Finnish, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Minusta tuntuu, että tarvitsemme tauon.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Ansaitset parempaa.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Meidän pitäisi tapailla muita ihmisiä.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Tarvitsen tilaa.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Mielestäni etenemme liian nopeasti.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Minun täytyy keskittyä uraani.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • En ole tarpeeksi hyvä sinulle.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • En vain rakasta sinua enää.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Emme vain ole sopivat toisillemme.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Se on parempi niin.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Olemme kasvaneet erilleen.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Finnish faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. FinnishPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Finnish language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Finnish Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Finnish speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    FinnishPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Finnish, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Finnish even faster.

    2- Having your Finnish romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Finnish language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Finnish lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Finnish partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why FinnishPod101 helps you learn Finnish Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Finnish

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Finnish is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at FinnishPod101 is translated into both English and Finnish. So, while your partner can help you learn Finnish faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Finnish Culture
    At FinnishPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Finland. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Finnish partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Finnish Phrases
    You now have access to FinnishPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Finnish soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    Runeberg Paiva: Celebrate the Day of Johan Ludvig Runeberg!

    Day of Johan Ludvig Runeberg

    Johan Ludvig Runeberg was Swedish-Finnish and is known for his writing and poetry. He was born on February 5, 1804 and died on May 6, 1877. Runeberg rose to the status of Finland’s national poet during his lifetime, due to his work being very “patriotic,” or isänmaallinen.

    Runeberg has received numerous awards for his work and is highly honored in Finnish culture. Thus, by learning about Runeberg Paiva you’ll get a nice look at Finland’s history and its values. It’s our wish at FinnishPod101.com to help you learn all you need to know about Finnish culture, and this famous Finnish poet is no exception.

    So, who was Runeberg and what is Runeberg Paiva?

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    1. What is the Day of J.L. Runeberg?

    Runeberg’s best-known work is “The Tales of Ensign Stål,” or in Finnish Vänrikki Stoolin tarinat, which is a collection of Johan Ludvig Runeberg poems which commemorate the Finnish war. The opening poem of the work was later composed to become the “Finnish national anthem,” or Suomen kansallislaulu, called Maamme which means “Our Land.”

    Runeberg’s poems were written in Swedish and dealt largely with life in rural Finland. Another famous poem of his, “Bonden Paavo,” or “Farmer Paavo,” is about a poor farmer who persevered despite years of difficult climates and poor harvests. The farmer fights off starvation by mixing bark into his bread. After several years, he finally reaps a rich harvest. Despite assurances from God that he can now eat bread made solely from grain, the farmer continues to mix bark into his bread in order to share the bounty with his struggling neighbor.

    Runeberg has received numerous national accolades including a day dedicated in his honor. Runeberg’s home, located in the center of Porvoo, was the first museum house in Finland. In addition, a number of monuments and memorials have been erected in his honor, and numerous streets, squares, and parks have been named after him.

    For example, there is a Runeberg street in Helsinki and a Runeberg park in his birth city of Jakobstad. One of Finland’s most prominent “literary awards,” or kirjallisuuspalkinto in Finnish, the Runeberg Prize, was also established in his honor.

    Further, Runeberg has been memorialized with a commemorative coin to celebrate the 200th anniversary of his birth. The coin was minted in 2004, and features Runeberg’s portrait on one side and a font from a Swedish newspaper on the reverse.

    Thus, it’s clear why Runeberg is so highly regarded by the Finnish people. Enough so that there’s a day held each year in his honor: The Day of J.L. Runeberg or Runeberg Paiva.

    2. When is it?

    February 5

    Each year, the Finnish people celebrate the famous Finnish poet J.L. Runeberg on the date of his birth, February 5.

    3. How is it Celebrated?

    Runeberg Tarts

    Runeberg’s Day is a well-established “flag day,” or liputuspäivä. Literary-themed events are held this day at places such as bookstores and cafes. Further, the Runeberg Prize mentioned earlier is fittingly awarded on this day in Porvoo.

    A well-known way to celebrate the day is to eat “Runeberg tarts,” or Runebergintorttuja, which are sweet pastries said to have been Runeberg’s favorite treat. The baked goods are usually available in grocery stores and cafes from January up until the day of J.L. Runeberg. Some of the cafes in Porvoo offer the pastries all year round.

    The cylindrical shaped, arrack- or rum-flavored tarts contain wheat flour, bread crumbs, cookie crumbs, and almonds, and they are decorated with raspberry jam and icing. (Do we need to wait until Runeberg Paiva to eat these?!)

    4. Additional Information

    It’s said that Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife, Fredrika Runeberg, developed the pastry mentioned above for her sweet-toothed husband from whatever ingredients she could find in the pantry.

    She was also a distinguished writer; she was the first Finnish historical novel writer, achieving popularity through her short stories as well as her novels. Talk about a great match!

    4. Reading Practice: Fredrika Runeberg

    Learn more about Johan Runeberg’s wife in the Finnish text below (the English translation is below):

    • Myös Johan Ludvig Runebergin vaimo Fredrika Runeberg oli ansioitunut kirjailija. Hän oli ensimmäisiä suomalaisia historiallisen romaanin kirjoittajia. Romaanien lisäksi hän saavutti suosiota lyhyillä kertomuksillaan.
    • Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife, Fredrika Runeberg, was also a distinguished writer. She was the first Finnish historical novel writer, achieving popularity through her short stories as well as her novels.

    It’s also said that Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife developed Runeberg tarts for her sweet-toothed husband from whatever ingredients she could find in the pantry. Yum!

    5. Must-know Vocab

    Man Sitting at Typewriter with Drink

    Here’s some vocabulary for you to go over in order to fully understand this Finnish holiday and celebrate it to its fullest.

    • päivä — “day”
    • runoilija — “poet”
    • kirjailija — “writer”
    • toimittaja — “journalist”
    • kansallisrunoilija — “national poet”
    • kansallislaulu — “national anthem”
    • torttu — “tart”
    • manteli — “almond”
    • rommi — “rum”
    • liputuspäivä — “Flag Day”

    To hear the pronunciation of each word, be sure to check out our Finnish J.L. Runeberg Day vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied with an audio file so you can listen while you read.

    Conclusion

    As you can see, Johan Ludvig Runeberg was one of the most influential Finnish writers and his work holds great significance to the Finnish people. Thus, J.L. Runeberg Day is widely celebrated and held in reverence by many Fins.

    What do you think about Runeberg and the Finns’ celebration of him? Is there a famous writer or other influential person your country celebrates? Let us know in the comments!

    For more information on Finnish culture, visit us at FinnishPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, vocabulary lists on a variety of topics, and even an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow Finnish learners! You can even download our MyTeacher app to take advantage of a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal language teacher.

    We hope you enjoyed learning about this Finnish holiday, and that you’ll enjoy making Runeberg tarts even more! Until next time, good luck in your language-learning!

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