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How To Post In Perfect Finnish on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Finnish, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Finnish.

At Learn Finnish, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Finnish in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Finnish

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Finnish. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Juha eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Juha’s post.

Lämmin suositus! Tästä ravintolasta saa mahtavaa sushia.
“A warm recommendation! You can get awesome sushi from this restaurant.”

1- Lämmin suositus!

First is an expression meaning “A warm recommendation!”
The first word means “warm,” and the second word means “recommendation.” You can use this expression whenever you want to recommend something or someone in a warm-hearted, empathetic way.

2- Tästä ravintolasta saa mahtavaa sushia.

Then comes the phrase - “You can get awesome sushi from this restaurant..”
You can use the expression, which means “You can get awesome…from this…”, to say you can find or buy something great from a shop or a restaurant. Sushi is quite trendy and popular in Finland, but as it isn’t a Finnish dish, not everyone has tried it. Also, usually only the bigger cities in Finland have sushi restaurants.

COMMENTS

In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

1- Nam! Näyttää herkulliselta.

His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Yum! Looks delicious.”
Use this expression to show you are appreciative of the food depicted in the photo.

2- En ole koskaan maistanut, mutta näyttää mielenkiintoiselta. Mukavaa iltaa!

His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “I have never tasted it, but it looks interesting. Have a nice evening!”
Use this expression to share personal information about the food, and wish the poster a pleasant experience.

3- Ehkä Juha viet tytöt joskus tuonne syömään?

His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Perhaps, Juha, you will take the girls to eat there sometime?”
Use this question only if you know the poster well - in context, you want the poster to take someone to the same restaurant.

4- Mennään kaikki yhdessä joku ilta!

His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s all go together some evening!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling sociable and would like to get together with the poster.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • suositus: “recommendation”
  • mahtava: “awesome”
  • näyttää joltakin: “to look like something”
  • maistaa (taste): “to taste”
  • mielenkiintoinen (interesting): “interesting”
  • mukava (nice): “nice”
  • yhdessä: “absolutely”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Finnish restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Finnish

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everyone loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Finnish phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Anne goes shopping with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Shoppailuterapiaa siskon kanssa! Upeita löytöjä.
    “Shopping therapy with my sister! Great findings.”

    1- Shoppailuterapiaa siskon kanssa!

    First is an expression meaning “Shopping therapy with sister!”
    The first word comes directly from the English phrase “shopping therapy.” You can use it in a playful way to describe time spent shopping as therapeutic.

    2- Upeita löytöjä.

    Then comes the phrase - “Great findings..”
    This expression is in the plural form. The first word means “great” or “fantastic.” The second word means “findings,” but when talking about shopping, it can also refer to “bargains.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Säästäkää jotakin mullekin!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Please, spare something for me too!”
    Use this expression to be funny and tease the poster a bit.

    2- Älä tuhlaa liikaa…

    Her boyfriend, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t spend too much…”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling concerned about the poster’s spending habits. But usually, this is not a topic you would discuss seriously on social media, so it serves more as a comment just to make conversation.

    3- Muista ostaa Juhalle tuliaisia!

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Remember to buy some souvenirs for Juha!”
    Use this expression when you want to contribute to the conversation with a suggestion.

    4- Olette varmasti löytäneet kauniita vaatteita. Pitäkää hauskaa!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “I’m sure you found some beautiful clothes. Have fun!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and wish the shoppers well.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • shoppailuterapia: “shopping therapy”
  • löytö: “finding”
  • säästää: “to spare”
  • mullekin: “for me too (spoken language)”
  • tuliainen: “souvenir”
  • kommentti: “comment”
  • löytää: “to find”
  • vaate: “a piece of clothing”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Finnish

    Sport events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunities for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Finnish.

    Juha plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Tänään rantalentistä poikien kanssa. Vierivä kivi ei sammaloidu!
    “Today, beach volley with the boys. The rolling stone gathers no moss!”

    1- Tänään rantalentistä poikien kanssa.

    First is an expression meaning “Today beach volley with the boys. .”
    Finns often refer to their male friends as “boys,” even when they’re already adults. The word for “volleyball” used here is actually a shortened version and a common nickname for the sport.

    2- Vierivä kivi ei sammaloidu!

    Then comes the phrase - “The rolling stone gathers no moss!”
    Unlike in English, in Finnish this common phrase is an appreciation of an active and energetic lifestyle. The first word means “rolling,” the second “stone”, and the third and fourth words together mean “does not gather moss.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Koita osua palloon!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Try to hit the ball!”
    Use this expression when you’re joking with the poster’s sport abilities.

    2- Taitaa olla myöhäistä…

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “I think it’s too late…”
    Use this expression if you are feeling concern over the time of the day.

    3- Upeaa! Kiva että viihdytte ulkona.

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Fantastic! It’s nice that you’re enjoying the outdoors.”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation with general, pleasant comments.

    4- Haluatteko poikien kanssa saunaan pelin jälkeen? Voin laittaa sen päälle.

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Do you want to go to the sauna with the boys after the game? I can switch it on.”
    This is a sentence that’s dependent on context and your relationship with the poster. The action, however, shows care and concern.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • rantalentis: “beach volley”
  • vieriä: “to roll”
  • sammaloitua: “to become mossy”
  • osua: “to hit”
  • myöhäinen: “late”
  • viihtyä: “to enjoy”
  • kanssa: “with”
  • laittaa päälle: “to switch on “
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Finnish

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Anne shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Ihana biisi, mitä kuuntelin eilen koko illan.
    “A wonderful tune that I listened to the whole evening yesterday.”

    1- Ihana biisi

    First is an expression meaning “A wonderful tune.”
    The first word means “wonderful” or “lovely.” The second is a colloquial word for “song.” This is used most often by young people or people in the music industry.

    2- mitä kuuntelin eilen koko illan.

    Then comes the phrase - “which I listened to the whole evening yesterday..”
    This sentence is in the past tense. After the relative pronoun, the first word is “I listened to”. The second word is “yesterday.” The third word is “whole,” and the last word means “evening.” The last word is in the genitive case. You can change the sentence by using another indication of time.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Söpö laulaja!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Cute singer!”
    Use this expression to share an opinion that agrees with the poster’s.

    2- Hänen keikalle olisi kiva mennä.

    Her high school friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “It would be nice to go to his gig.”
    Use this expression when you also like the music and express a wish to experience the artist live.

    3- Minä en ymmärrä nykymusiikkia enää ollenkaan..

    Her supervisor, Hannu, uses an expression meaning - “I don’t understand contemporary music at all anymore…”
    Use this expression to share an opinion that doesn’t agree with the poster’s. This is probably what an older person would comment about the music.

    4- Tämä biisi on jo tosi vanha!

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “This song is already really old!”
    This is another personal opinion, which is also different from the poster’s. It’s more likely the thing a younger, trendy person would say about the music.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ihana: “lovely, wonderful”
  • biisi: “song”
  • kuunnella: “to listen”
  • söpö: “cute”
  • keikka: “gig”
  • nykymusiikki: “contemporary music”
  • ollenkaan: “at all”
  • tosi: “really”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Finnish Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Finnish!

    Juha goes to a concert, posts an image of the band, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Basso raikaa, nyt rokataan!
    “The bass is blaring. Let’s rock!”

    1- Basso raikaa

    First is an expression meaning “The bass is blaring.”
    The first word is direct from English and, naturally, means “bass.” The second word is an old verb, which means “to blare.” This refers to hearing loud music or other sounds. It’s also used almost only in the third person singular.

    2- nyt rokataan!

    Then comes the phrase - “let’s rock!.”
    The first word means “now,” and the second is the passive tense of the verb “to rock.” You can use this expression, for example, when you’re in a fun, laidback situation with friends and are about to start an energetic activity.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Eikä! Mahtavaa!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “No way! That’s great!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    2- Ostit kuitenkin varmasti korvatulpat.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Nonetheless, you surely bought earplugs.”
    Use this expression if you think the music is too loud and not good for a person’s hearing. It’s a suggestion to the poster.

    3- Tuun ensi kerralla mukaan!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “I’m coming along next time!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling eager to join the poster next time.

    4- Älä riehu liikaa…

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t rave too much…”
    This comment is expressing a concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • raikua: “to blare”
  • rokata: “to rock”
  • eikä: “no way”
  • kuitenkin: “nonetheless”
  • varmasti: “surely”
  • korvatulpat: “ear plugs”
  • ensi kerralla: “next time”
  • riehua: “to rave”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Finnish

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Finnish phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Anne accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Voi itku, kännykkä on mäsänä! Minut tavoittaa toistaiseksi siis vain somen ja sähköpostin kautta.
    “Oh no, my phone is smashed! For now, you can only reach me through social media and e-mail.”

    1- Voi itku, kännykkä on mäsänä!

    First is an expression meaning “Oh no, my mobile phone is smashed! .”
    The first two words of the sentence are a phrase expressing frustration and vexation when encountering a surprising, negative incident. The first word means “oh,” and the second word means “cry.” The third word is a kind of a nickname, a common colloquial name for a mobile phone. The last word of the sentence is a spoken language word for something that is broken or shattered.

    2- Minut tavoittaa toistaiseksi siis vain somen ja sähköpostin kautta.

    Then comes the phrase - “So for now, you can reach me only through social media and e-mail..”
    Social media is commonly referred to in Finland using the first two initials of each word: S-O and M-E.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mitä tapahtui?

    Her boyfriend, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “What happened?”
    Use this expression if you would like more information about the incident the poster describes.

    2- Voi ei! Korvaako vakuutus?

    Her friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Oh no! Does the insurance cover it?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling sorry for the poster about the incident, and want to know more details.

    3- Voi miten kurjaa!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, how miserable!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling sympathy for the poster’s plight.

    4- Siis tuhosit taas yhden puhelimen. Aikamoinen terminaattori.

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “So you destroyed another phone yet again. Quite the terminator.”
    Use this expression to employ a bit of sarcasm in a humorous way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • itku: “cry”
  • kännykkä: “mobile phone”
  • mäsä: “broken”
  • some: “social media”
  • sähköposti: “e-mail”
  • korvata: “to compensate”
  • vakuutus: “insurance”
  • aikamoinen: “quite the”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Finnish. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Finnish

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Finnish!

    Juha gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Kuolen tylsyyteen… pakko keksiä jotakin tekemistä!
    “I’m dying of boredom… I must come up with something to do!”

    1- Kuolen tylsyyteen…

    First is an expression meaning “I’m dying of boredom….”
    The first word simply means “I am dying.” The second one means “of boredom.” This phrase isn’t meant seriously, of course; it’s just a playful exaggeration to say an experience is unbearable.

    2- pakko keksiä jotakin tekemistä!

    Then comes the phrase - “I must come up with something to do!”
    The first word is a noun for “compulsion.” Together with a verb, it can be used to express that you must do something. This expression is used relatively often in Finnish conversations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tuu korjaamaan mun pyörä!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Come and fix my bike!”
    Use this expression to joke with the poster and their situation.

    2- Olisiko tänään hyvä päivä pihatöille?

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Would today be a good day for yardwork?”
    This is another expression that could be meant as a joke, or, in this context, perhaps the girlfriend is a bit serious about the suggestion?!

    3- Aina voi opiskella!

    His supervisor, Hannu, uses an expression meaning - “You can always study!”
    Use this expression to suggest another activity for the poster.

    4- Ota kerrankin vain rennosti! Katso joku hyvä elokuva?

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “For once, just take it easy! Maybe watch a good movie?”
    Use this expression to suggest a leisurely activity to alleviate the poster’s boredom.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kuolla: “to die”
  • tylsyys: “boredom”
  • pakko: “must”
  • tekeminen: “doing”
  • korjata: “to fix”
  • pihatyöt: “yardwork”
  • ottaa rennosti: “to take easy”
  • elokuva: “movie”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Finnish

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Finnish about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Anne feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Vitsi mikä päivä! Aivot ei toimi enää ollenkaan. Kauhea nälkä.
    “Oh man, what a day! My brain doesn’t function at all anymore. So hungry.”

    1- Vitsi mikä päivä! Aivot ei toimi enää ollenkaan.

    First is an expression meaning “Oh man what a day! My brain doesn’t function at all anymore.”
    The first two words of the first sentence, together with a noun, are a common way to sigh and exclaim something. Literally, the first word means “joke,” but in this context it’s emphasizing how awful or good something has been. Also, it’s relatively common in Finland to say one’s brain is not working anymore when one is very tired.

    2- Kauhea nälkä.

    Then comes the phrase - “So hungry…”
    The first word means “terrible,” and the second word means “hunger” or “famine.” This is an often heard phrase from someone who is very hungry. You can also replace the second word with another noun, for example “fatigue”, “väsymys”, to express how terribly tired you are.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Pistä Juha kokkaamaan ja antamaan sinulle niska-hartiahieronta!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Make Juha cook and give you a neck and shoulder massage!”
    Use this suggestion to show you’re caring about the poster’s predicament.

    2- Palautumisia! Yritä ottaa rauhallisemmin.

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Try to recover! Try to take it easy.”
    These are also warmhearted, well-intended advice to the poster.

    3- Älä valita vaan tee ruokaa.

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t complain, just make some food.”
    Use this expression to joke with the poster in a somewhat bossy, insulting way. Probably best reserved only for people who knows you well enough to understand you’re joking.

    4- Huomenna otat kevyemmin.

    Her boyfriend, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Tomorrow you’re going to take it (more) lightly.”
    Use this expression to show you care about the poster’s situation, and to make a positive, supportive suggestion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • aivot: “brains”
  • toimia: “to function”
  • ollenkaan: “at all”
  • kauhea: “terrible”
  • nälkä: “hunger”
  • Palautumisia!: “Try to recover!”
  • ottaa rauhallisesti: “to take it easy”
  • ottaa kevyesti: “to take it lightly”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Finnish! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Finnish

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Finnish.

    Juha suffers a serious injury, posts an image of himself in a cast, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Nyt kävi näin. Ainakin neljä viikkoa kipsissä. Aika parantaa haavat, eikö niin?
    “So, this happened. At least four weeks in a cast. Time heals wounds, doesn’t it?”

    1- Nyt kävi näin. Ainakin neljä viikkoa kipsissä.

    First is an expression meaning - “So this happened. At least four weeks in a cast.”
    The first sentence says something significant has happened, in a relatively ironic, dryly humorous way. Literally, it means “now this happened”.

    2- Aika parantaa haavat, eikö niin?

    Then comes the phrase - “Time heals wounds, doesn’t it?.”
    The first part is a common and traditional proverb, literally meaning that all healing takes time. It can be used when something bad has happened to someone, to comfort them and to remind that things will get better gradually.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hurjannäköistä!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Looks fierce!”
    Use this expression to show your sympathy with modern slang. It means that the injury looks serious.

    2- Voi itku! Sattuuko paljon?

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Oh no! Does it hurt much?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling sorry for the poster, and want to know more details.

    3- Mitä möhlit tällä kertaa?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “So what did you blunder this time?”
    Use this expression to be sympathetic in a slightly sarcastic, humorous way. Again, probably best not to use this with someone who doesn’t know your style well.

    4- Harmin paikka. Nyt vain paljon lepoa!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Such a pity. Now just rest a lot!”
    Use this expression to show sympathy and to make a supportive suggestion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nyt: “now”
  • aika: “hour, time”
  • parantaa: “to heal”
  • haava: “wound”
  • sattua: “to hurt”
  • möhliä: “to blunder”
  • tällä kertaa: “this time”
  • lepo: “rest”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Finnish

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Anne feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Ihan kamala keli! Piti ajaa kieli keskellä suuta.
    “Just horrible weather! I had to drive super careful.”

    1- Ihan kamala keli!

    First is an expression meaning “Just horrible weather!”
    The second word means “terrible” or “horrible,” and the third word means “weather”. The first word is an adverb meaning “right” or “quite”. Here it underlines just how terrible the weather is.

    2- Piti ajaa kieli keskellä suuta.

    Then comes the phrase - “I had to drive super careful”.
    This sentence literally means “I had to drive with my tongue in the middle of my mouth.” This is an expression of that means that you really have to pay attention, concentrate on something, and be very careful.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Onneksi olet ehjänä perillä.

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Luckily you made it home in one piece.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling grateful about the poster’s safety.

    2- Hui! Onneksi pääsit turvallisesti kotiin! Minä lensin jo aamulla nenälleni.

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Yikes! Fortunately, you got home safely! I fell flat on my face already in the morning…”
    Use this expression to show empathy with the poster, and share a personal detail too.

    3- Täydellinen sää harjoitella jäällä ajamista.

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “It’s the perfect weather to practice driving on ice.”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation by sharing information.

    4- Olkaahan kaikki varovaisia tänään liikenteessä.

    Her boyfriend, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Please be careful in traffic today, everyone.”
    Use this expression to remind everyone of something for their own safety.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kamala: “horrible”
  • keli: “weather”
  • kieli: “tongue”
  • onneksi: “fortunately”
  • lentää nenälleen: “to fall flat on one’s face (lit. to fly on one’s nose)”
  • harjoitella: “to practice”
  • varovainen: “careful”
  • liikenne: “traffic”
  • How would you comment in Finnish when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Finnish

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Juha changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Anne, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Askel eteenpäin. Tässä on se kauniimpi osapuoli.
    “One step forward. Here is my more beautiful half.”

    1- Askel eteenpäin.

    First is an expression meaning “One step forward. .”
    The first word means “step,” and the second word means “forward.” You can use this expression when you’ve made progress with something.

    2- Tässä on se kauniimpi osapuoli.

    Then comes the phrase - “Here is the more beautiful half..”
    This is a relatively common phrase in Finland, as Finnish men sometimes refer to their girlfriends or wives as being the more beautiful person of the couple.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hienoa! Onnea!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Great! Congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show your enthusiasm about the news, and congratulate the couple in a traditional way.

    2- No vihdoinkin!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Well finally!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling playful and frivolous, but positive about the news.

    3- Tätä on odotettu… Onnea ihanat!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “This was expected… Congratulations lovelies!”
    Use this expression to show your approval of the couple’s new status, and congratulate them using a term of endearment.

    4- Kiitos kaikille ja kiitos kulta kehuista!

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you, everyone. And thank you, sweety, for the praise!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling appreciative of the posters’ comments, as well as your partner’s praise.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • askel: “step”
  • eteenpäin: “forward”
  • kaunis: “beautiful”
  • vihdoinkin: “finally”
  • odottaa: “to wait”
  • ihana: “lovely”
  • kulta: “sweety”
  • kehu: “praise”
  • What would you say in Finnish when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Finnish

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Finnish.

    Anne is getting married today, so she leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Yllätys!! Karkasimme vihille!
    “Surprise!! We eloped!”

    1- Yllätys!!

    First is an expression meaning “Surprise!!”
    You can use this word in any kind of situation where you want to share unexpected news.

    2- Karkasimme vihille!

    Then comes the phrase - “We eloped!”
    The first word literally means “we escaped.” The second word means “to marriage.” Therefore, this phrase can be used when someone has gotten married without telling anyone.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Olen virallisesti maailman onnellisin mies.

    Her husband, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “I’m officially the happiest man in the world.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling happy with your marriage partner.

    2- Ette ole tosissanne!! Onnea hurjasti!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “You’re not serious!! Huge congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling surprised by the news, but are still excited and pleased about it.

    3- Ihanaa! Kaunis morsian, upea puku ja komea sulhanen!

    Her friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Wonderful! Beautiful bride, gorgeous dress, and handsome groom!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling appreciative and happy for the bride about the news, as well as the groom’s appearance.

    4- Ohhoh! Lämpöiset onnittelut minultakin!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Wow! Warm congratulations from me as well!”
    This is also an expression of happy surprise, and a more traditional congratulation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • yllätys: “surprise”
  • karata vihille: “to elope”
  • virallisesti: “officially”
  • onnellinen: “happy”
  • olla tosissaan: “to be serious”
  • upea: “gorgeous”
  • morsian: “bride”
  • sulhanen: “groom”
  • How would you respond in Finnish to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Finnish

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Finnish.

    Juha finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Vauvauutisia! Isimies on onnellinen!

    “Baby news! Daddyman is happy!”

    1- Vauvauutisia!

    First is an expression meaning “Baby news!”
    This word is comprised of two parts, the first one meaning “a baby” and the second one meaning “news.” This word can be used when someone is announcing a pregnancy or the arrival of a new baby.

    2- Isimies on onnellinen!

    Then comes the phrase - “Daddyman is happy!”
    The first word in this sentence, meaning “daddyman”, is a neologism. It affectionately or ironically describes a man who’s a father, and is a quite popular word in social media, especially for people in their 20s or 30s.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Onpa mahtava uutinen heti viikon aluksi, paljon onnea!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Such great news right at the beginning of the week, congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling very happy about the news, and congratulate the expecting parents.

    2- Olen niin kovin onnellinen teidän puolestanne. Halauksia!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “I am so very happy for you. Hugs!”
    Another expression of happiness about the news.

    3- Onnea murut!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations sweeties!”
    This is a short congratulation, using a term of endearment.

    4- Vau, onnea teille!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Wow, congratulations to you!”
    As in the previous lesson, this expression of happy surprise and a congratulation is appropriate in this situation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vauva: “baby”
  • isi: “daddy”
  • onnellinen: “happy”
  • uutinen: “news”
  • kovin: “very”
  • teidän puolestanne: “on your behalf (pl.)”
  • halaus: “hug”
  • muru: “sweety”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Finnish Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Finnish.

    Anne plays with her baby, posts an image of the cutie pie, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Mammalla on unet vähissä, mutta se ei haittaa kun vauva on tämmöinen rakkauspakkaus.
    “Mama doesn’t get enough sleep, but it doesn’t matter because the baby is such a love package.”

    1- Mammalla on unet vähissä

    First is an expression meaning “Mama doesn’t get enough sleep.”
    Literally, this sentence means “Mama has a short supply of sleep”. Sleep, dreams, and so on are sometimes treated as substances in the Finnish language. It’s something you can have a lot or little of. Modern mothers also sometimes playfully refer to themselves with the word “mama.”

    2- mutta se ei haittaa kun vauva on tämmöinen rakkauspakkaus.

    Then comes the phrase - “but it doesn’t matter as the baby is such a love package..”
    The last word, “love package”, is a commonly-used, playful word in social media to describe someone sweet, cute, and lovable. Usually it’s used in reference to babies, little children, or pets.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Voi kun pääsisin pian halailemaan häntä! Niin suloinen pikkuinen.

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Oh I wish I could come and cuddle him soon! Such a sweet little one.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling very warmhearted and appreciative of the baby.

    2- Ihan Juhan näköinen!

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “He looks just like Juha!”
    Use this expression to share your opinion about who the baby resembles.

    3- Voi miten suloinen hän on.

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Oh how cute he is.”
    Use this expression to indicate that you also feel positive about the baby.

    4- Apua miten söpö!

    Her friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “(Help) how cute!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling almost overwhelmed by the baby’s charms.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • mamma: “mama, mamma”
  • uni: “sleep”
  • vähissä: “in short supply”
  • tämmöinen: “of this short”
  • suloinen: “cute, sweet”
  • pikkuinen: “the little one”
  • jonkun näköinen: “looking like someone”
  • söpö: “cute”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Finnish! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Finnish Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Juha goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Pitkästä aikaa juhlat koko suvun kesken!
    “A party with the whole family after (such) a long time!”

    1- Pitkästä aikaa

    First is an expression meaning “After a long time.”
    This expression means “after a long time” or “long time no see.” This is a bit of a strange phrase, as the first word is the elative case of the word “long,” and the second word is the partitive case of the word “time”. Therefore, literally the expression would be “from the long time.” This expression can be used whenever something is happening after a long pause - be it meeting other people and greeting them with this expression, or simply explaining that you’re going somewhere after a long time.

    2- juhlat koko suvun kesken

    Then comes the phrase - “a party with the whole family.”
    The first word means “party”; the second word means “whole”; the third word in this context means “the extended family” - i.e. aunts, uncles, etc., - and the last word in this context means “amongst.” In some cases, the last word can mean “midst” or “inter-” something.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hauskoja juhlia!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Have a fun party!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- Onpa teillä paljon ruokaa! Tuokaa mulle ylimääräiset!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “My, how much food you have! Bring me the extra!”
    Use these phrases to be humorous and want to participate in the conversation with funny suggestions.

    3- Onneksi pääsin mukaan. Mukava tutustua sukulaisiisi!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Luckily I could come too. It’s nice to get to know your relatives!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling good about being part of the celebrations.

    4- Suku on pahin, vai miten se meni?

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Family is the worst, or how did it go?”
    Use this expression to use sarcasm in a humorous way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pitkästä aikaa: “after a long time”
  • suku: “family”
  • kesken: “amongst”
  • ruoka: “food”
  • ylimääräinen: “extra”
  • onneksi: “luckily”
  • tutustua: “to meet, to get to know”
  • pahin: “worst”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Finnish

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Finnish about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Anne waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Aikainen lintu madon nappaa. Tänään oli aikainen herätys, mutta tämä on sen arvoista!
    “Early bird catches the worm. It was an early wake-up today, but this is worth it!”

    1- Aikainen lintu madon nappaa.

    First is an expression meaning “Early bird catches the worm..”
    This traditional proverb is also well-known in Finland. The first word means “early”; the second word means “bird”; the third word is the genitive case of the word “worm”, and the fourth word is the verb “to catch” in the third person singular. You can use this proverb in situations where you have to wake up early or go somewhere early in order to achieve something.

    2- Tänään oli aikainen herätys,

    Then comes the phrase - “It was an early wake-up today”.
    The first word means “today”, the second word is the past tense of the verb ‘to be’, the third word means “early” and the fourth word is “wake-up”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Oho, minne matka?

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Wow, where are you traveling to?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious about the poster’s plans for holiday.

    2- Hyi, matoja - ei kiitos. Mutta ihanaa reissua!!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Ugh, worms - no thanks. But have a wonderful trip!!”
    Use this expression to be funny, but also positive.

    3- Nauti!

    Her friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    4- Koita nukkua lentokoneessa.

    Her supervisor, Hannu, uses an expression meaning - “Try to sleep on the plane.”
    Use this expression to give advice you think the poster might find valuable.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • aikainen: “early”
  • herätys: “wake-up”
  • sen arvoinen: “worth it”
  • minne: “where”
  • matka: “road, way, journey”
  • hyi: “ugh”
  • koittaa: “to try”
  • lentokone: “airplane”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Finnish!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Finnish

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Finnish phrases!

    Juha finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Löysin kotimaisen design-klassikon vitosella kirppikseltä. Ei paha.
    “I found a domestically designed classic for a fiver at a flea market. Not bad.”

    1- Löysin kotimaisen design-klassikon vitosella kirppikseltä.

    First is an expression meaning “I found a domestically designed classic for a fiver at a flea market..”
    People, especially young adults, in Finland love to treasure hunt in flea markets. Domestic design classics found at flea markets are considered to be the ultimate treasures! The second to last word here is kind of a nickname for five euros, and the last word is a commonly used abbreviation for “flea market.”

    2- Ei paha.

    Then comes the phrase - “Not bad.”
    A commonly used expression, especially among young adults and young men, “not bad” is used to express subdued and cool satisfaction and contentment. Sometimes it’s used with a sarcastic or ironic tone.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ihana aarre!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “A wonderful treasure!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the find.

    2- Vautsi! Tuo valaisin oli tosi edullinen löytö!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Wow! That lamp was a very affordable find!”
    Another optimistic, positive comment.

    3- Vanhaa roinaa…

    His nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Old junk…”
    Use this expression to joke a bit with the poster, and/or if you are good friends and know one another well.

    4- Vanhemmillani on ollut samanlainen valaisin. Arvokas esine!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “My parents had a similar lamp. A valuable object!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • löytää: “to find”
  • kotimainen: “domestic”
  • design-klassikko: “design classic”
  • vitonen: “fiver”
  • kirppis: “flea market”
  • aarre: “treasure”
  • edullinen: “affordable”
  • roina: “junk”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Finnish

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Finnish, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Anne visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Pitkäaikainen haave toteutui tänään. Tämän lisäksi tiedossa aurinkoa, palmuja ja drinkkejä!
    “A long-time dream came true today. In addition to this, there will be sun, palm trees, and drinks!”

    1- Pitkäaikainen haave toteutui tänään.

    First is an expression meaning “A long-term dream came true today..”
    The first word is actually comprised of two parts, “long” and “time.” You can use this word to explain something has been going on for a long time.

    2- Tämän lisäksi tiedossa aurinkoa, palmuja ja drinkkejä!

    Then comes the phrase - “In addition to this, there will be sun, palm trees and drinks!”
    Autumn and winter in Finland is quite dark, long, and cold. Therefore, Finns love to travel to somewhere warm and sunny during these seasons. It’s common to brag about holiday leisures on social media. It’s also common to see other Finns reminding the holiday-goers about the miserable weather back home.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hieno paikka ja hieno kuva!

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “A great place and a great picture!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling appreciative of the poster’s photo and their destination.

    2- Ja täällä sataa räntää.

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “And it’s sleeting here.”
    Use this expression to share information about your own weather, if it’s snowing.

    3- Älä unohda tuliaisia!

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t forget souvenirs!”
    Use this expression if you expect a gift from the poster when they’re back.

    4- Ensi kerralla minä tulen mukaan.

    Her husband, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Next time I’m coming with you.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling keen to join the poster on the next trip.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pitkäaikainen: “long-term”
  • haave: “dream”
  • toteutua: “to come true”
  • aurinko: “sun”
  • paikka: “place”
  • räntä: “sleet”
  • tuliainen: “souvenir”
  • ensi kerralla: “next time”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Finnish

    So you’re doing nothing, yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Finnish!

    Juha relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Viikonloppu alkaa rannalta. Kyllä nyt kelpaa.
    “The weekend begins at the beach. This will certainly do.”

    1- Viikonloppu alkaa rannalta.

    First is an expression meaning “The weekend begins at the beach..”
    For Finns, Friday is perhaps the most long-awaited day of the week. In summertime, many Finns head to beaches, parks, or their summerhouses right after work on Fridays to enjoy the lovely weather and relax.

    2- Kyllä nyt kelpaa.

    Then comes the phrase - “This will certainly do..”
    The last word of this sentence is a verb meaning “to pass muster.” This demotic phrase, even though it literally sounds modest, actually means something is exceptionally nice.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tulossa mahtava viikonloppu!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “It’s going to be an amazing weekend!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the weekend’s prospects.

    2- Mites huomenna? Menetkö taas rannalle? Voinko tulla mukaan?

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “How about tomorrow? Are you going to the beach again? Can I tag along?”
    Use these questions to discuss possible plans with the poster.

    3- Hieno paikka.

    His supervisor, Hannu, uses an expression meaning - “A fine place.”
    Use this just to comment on the destination.

    4- Mukavaa viikonloppua!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Have a nice weekend!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster a good weekend.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • viikonloppu: “weekend”
  • ranta: “beach “
  • kelvata: “to do, to be good enough”
  • mites: “how about (abbr.)”
  • mahtava: “amazing”
  • huomenna: “tomorrow”
  • hieno: “fine”
  • mukava: “nice”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Finnish When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Anne returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Oma koti kullan kallis! Ihanaa olla taas kotona.
    “Home sweet home! It’s wonderful to be back home again.”

    1- Oma koti kullan kallis!

    First is an expression meaning “Home sweet home!”
    Literally, this phrase means “own home is worthy of gold.” It’s a traditional proverb that’s well-known in Finland.

    2- Ihanaa olla taas kotona.

    Then comes the phrase - “It’s wonderful to be back home again…”
    Even though Finns love to travel, they also love to stay home. House parties and get-togethers at people’s houses are very common in Finland, as the home is a place for relaxing and enjoying.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tervetuloa takaisin!

    Her husband, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back!”
    Use this expression to make the poster feel welcome and at home from their trip.

    2- Toivottavasti oli kiva reissu.

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you had a nice trip.”
    Use this expression simply to partake in the conversation with positive comments. Sometimes this can be a good conversation starter too.

    3- Kiva että olet taas täällä!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “(It’s) nice that you’re here again!”
    Use this expression to share your positive feelings about the poster’s return from holiday.

    4- Missä tuliaiset?

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Where’s the souvenirs?”
    Use this expression in a joking manner, continuing the theme of expecting a gift from the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • oma: “own”
  • koti: “home”
  • kulta: “gold”
  • kallis: “dear”
  • tervetuloa: “welcome”
  • toivottavasti: “hopefully”
  • reissu: “trip”
  • kiva: “nice”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public holiday such as May Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Finnish

    It’s a public holiday and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Juha is attending a May Day picnic, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Vappupöytä koreana! Ullanlinnanmäellä ollaan!
    “(The) May Day table is dashing! We are at Ullanlinnanmäki!”

    1- Vappupöytä koreana!

    First is an expression meaning “May Day table is dashing!.”
    The first word is a combination of “May Day” - a popular spring festival on the 1st of May - and “table”. The word means the food offered at the festive May Day table. Having a festive picnic on the 1st of May is a tradition in Finland. The table isn’t always an actual table, but a blanket on the ground!

    The second word means “is dashing.” This expression is used especially when describing how abundant and versatile food is offered.

    2- Ullanlinnanmäellä ollaan!

    Then comes the phrase - “We are at Ullanlinnanmäki!.”
    The most popular place to gather for a May Day picnic is the Ullanlinnamäki hill in Kaivopuisto park in Helsinki. It’s also known by its nickname “Ullis”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hauskaa vappua!

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Happy May Day!”
    This is the traditional May Day greeting.

    2- Säästäkää mulle nakkeja!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Please spare some wieners for me!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous, just to partake in the conversation. Unless you’re serious about the instruction that some wieners be saved for you!

    3- Ulliksella nähdään!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “See you at Ullis!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    4- Kohta nähdään. Tuon vappumunkkeja tullessani - ellen syö itse kaikkia!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “See you soon. I’m bringing May Day donuts with me - unless I eat all of them by myself!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vappupöytä: “May Day table”
  • korea: “dashing”
  • säästää: “to spare”
  • mulle: “for me (spoken lang.)”
  • nakki: “wiener”
  • vappu: “May Day”
  • kohta: “soon”
  • vappumunkki: “May Day donut”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    May Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Finnish

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Anne goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Yllätyssynttärit! Kiitos kaikki ihanat!
    “A surprise birthday party! Thank you all, you lovelies!”

    1- Yllätyssynttärit!

    First is an expression meaning “A surprise birthday party!.”
    This word is a combination of two words: “surprise” and “birthday party”. You can combine the first part, “suprise”, with other nouns to create a word that describes something being unexpected.

    2- Kiitos kaikki ihanat!

    Then comes the phrase - “Thank you all you lovelies!”
    Especially young Finnish people, and females in particular, refer to their friends with numerous terms of endearment. The last word of this phrase is one of those. In this case, the adjective “lovely” has become a noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Voi miten ihanaa! Hyvää syntymäpäivää!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Oh how wonderful! Happy Birthday!”
    Use this expression to congratulate the poster.

    2- Paljon onnea vielä, kaunotar!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations again, beauty!”
    Use this expression to be supportive and loving.

    3- Sinä vain kaunistut vuosi vuodelta!

    Her husband, Juha, uses an expression meaning - “You are becoming more beautiful year by year!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling very appreciative of your partner’s looks.

    4- Ällöttävää. Onneksi ei tarvinnut osallistua.

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “Yucky. Fortunately I didn’t have to participate.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling cynical, hopefully in a joking manner.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • yllätys: “surprise”
  • synttärit: “birthday”
  • kiitos: “thank you”
  • ihana: “lovely”
  • syntymäpäivä: “birthday”
  • kaunotar: “beauty”
  • kaunistua: “to become beautiful”
  • ällöttävä: “yucky”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Finnish

    Impress your friends with your Finnish New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Juha celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Poks ja kippis! Hyvää uutta vuotta ystävät!
    “Pop and cheers! Happy New Year, friends!”

    1- Poks ja kippis!

    First is an expression meaning “Pop and cheers!”
    The first word is an onomatopoeic word describing the sound of a champagne bottle opening. The second word is the Finnish equivalent for “cheers”. Opening a bottle of sparkling wine or champagne at midnight on New Year’s eve is a tradition for the majority of Finnish people.

    2- Hyvää uutta vuotta ystävät!

    Then comes the phrase - “Happy New Year friends!”
    This is a very common way to wish Happy New Year to your friends. The first three words, “good,” “new,” and “year,” are all in the partitive case. The last word means “friends”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Onnellista uutta vuotta!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling friendly.

    2- Hauskaa uutta vuotta!

    His high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year!”
    Use this expression to greet people on this day in a traditional way.

    3- Kippis uudelle vuodelle!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers for the New Year!”
    This is a more informal New Year greeting and wish.

    4- Hyvää uutta vuotta! Teitkö uuden vuoden lupauksia?

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year! Did you make any New Year’s resolutions?”
    Use these phrases when you want to start a conversation about New Year resolutions.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kippis: “cheers”
  • hyvä: “good”
  • uusi vuosi: “New Year”
  • hauska: “fun”
  • ystävä: “friend”
  • tehdä: “to make”
  • uuden vuoden lupaus: “New Year’s resolution”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Finnish

    What will you say in Finnish about Christmas?

    Anne celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Hyvää joulua ystävät ja kiitos ihanista joulukorteista! Itse tuin joulukorttirahoilla tänä vuonna saimaannorppia!
    “Merry Christmas friends and thank you for the lovely Christmas cards! This year I supported the Saimaa Ringed Seals with the Christmas Card money instead!”

    1- Hyvää joulua ystävät ja kiitos ihanista joulukorteista!

    First is an expression meaning “Merry Christmas friends and thank you for the lovely Christmas cards!”
    It is an old tradition to send Christmas greeting cards to friends and family members in Finland. Recently, it has become more popular to donate the money normally spent on Christmas cards to some charity instead, and send one’s Christmas wishes through social media.

    2- Itse tuin joulukorttirahoilla tänä vuonna saimaannorppia!

    Then comes the phrase - “This year I supported the Saimaa Ringed Seal with the Christmas Card money instead…”
    The Saimaa ringed seal is one of the most endangered animals in the world. The only existing population of these seals is found in Lake Saimaa, Finland. Recently many Finns have shown the urge to protect these animals through donations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lepoa ja rauhaa, niin sinulle, Juhalle, kuin saimaannorpillekin!

    Her neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Rest and tranquility, to you, Juha, as well as the Saimaa Ringed Seals!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster, as well as the seals a peaceful and relaxed Christmas.

    2- Hyvää joulua!

    Her high school friend, Venla, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas!”
    This is the traditional Christmas wish.

    3- Koska saan joululahjani?

    Her nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “When will I get my Christmas present?”
    Use this expression to be funny in a sarcastic way.

    4- Rentouttavia joulunpyhiä!

    Her college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “Have a relaxing Christmas holiday!”
    This is a wish for a restful holiday.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Hyvää joulua: “Merry Christmas”
  • joulukortti: “Christmas card”
  • joulukorttirahat: “Christmas card money”
  • saimaannorppa: “Saimaa Ringed Seal”
  • lepo: “rest”
  • rauha: “tranquility”
  • joululahja: “Christmas present”
  • rentouttava: “relaxing”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Finnish

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Finnish phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Juha celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juha’s post.

    Toinen hääpäivä, tällä kertaa auringon alla. Ja vauvan kanssa!
    “The second wedding anniversary, this time under the sun. And with a baby!”

    1- Toinen hääpäivä

    First is an expression meaning “second wedding anniversary.”
    The second word, meaning “anniversary” is actually comprised of two words: “wedding” and “day”.

    2- auringon alla

    Then comes the phrase - “under the sun.”
    This phrase, “under the sun,” is often used when someone has traveled somewhere abroad where it’s hot and sunny.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juha’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ihanaa lomaa ja hääpäivää koko porukalle!

    His friend, Virpi, uses an expression meaning - “Have a wonderful holiday and wedding anniversary the whole lot of you!”
    This is a warm and friendly wish for the couple on their anniversary.

    2- Oltiin samassa paikassa pari vuotta sitten. Mahtavaa lomaa!

    His college friend, Leo, uses an expression meaning - “We were at that same place a couple of years ago. Have an awesome holiday!”
    Use this expression to share some personal information, and wish the couple a good break.

    3- Aurinko polttaa.

    His nephew, Elias, uses an expression meaning - “The sun burns.”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation with a negative comment, trying to be funny. It’s anybody’s guess whether or not the comment will be considered humorous.

    4- Mukavaa hääpäivää! Kuinka kauan olette matkalla?

    His neighbor, Ellen, uses an expression meaning - “Have a nice wedding anniversary! How long will you be traveling?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and want to know more information.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • hääpäivä: “wedding day, anniversary”
  • tällä kertaa: “this time”
  • vauva: “baby”
  • kanssa: “with”
  • loma: “vacation”
  • porukka: “lot”
  • polttaa: “to burn”
  • kuinka kauan: “How long”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Finnish! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Say Sorry in Finnish

    Thumbnail

    Learn how to apologize in Finnish - fast and accurately! FinnishPod101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Finnish Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Finnish
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Finnish
    3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Finnish through FinnishPod101


    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Finnish

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Finnish. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Olen pahoillani.
    I’m sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Finnish or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Haluaisin pyytää anteeksi.
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Finnish. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Pyydän vilpittömästi anteeksi.
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    En tee sitä enää.
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Pidän huolen siitä, etten tee tätä virhettä uudelleen.
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    En tarkoittanut sitä.
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Se on minun syyni.
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Olen pahoillani siitä, että olen itsekäs.
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Toivottavasti annat minulle anteeksi.
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Otan täyden vastuun.
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Minun ei olisi pitänyt tehdä sitä.
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Anteeksi, että annan rahasi takaisin niin myöhään.
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Älä ole vihainen minulle.
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Anteeksi että olen myöhässä.
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Pyydän anteeksi, että olin sinulle ilkeä.
    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Finnish

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Finnish! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at FinnishPod101 about how to use the correct Finnish words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Finnish? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Finnish. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Finnish through FinnishPod101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! FinnishPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Finnish!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Finnish with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Finnish dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about FinnishPod101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Finnish teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Finnish word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Finnish level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Finnish, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in FinnishPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Finnish!

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    Learn How to Confidently Introduce Yourself In Finnish

    Start off the year by learning how to introduce yourself properly in Finnish! Learn easily with FinnishPod101 in this four-minute video!

    Table of Contents

    1. 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in Finnish
    2. Important Tips for Introducing Yourself
    3. Video - How to Introduce Yourself in Finnish
    4. Why FinnishPod101 is Perfect for Learning all about Finnish Introductions

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    1. 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in Finnish

    ”About

    First impressions are absolutely everything! Right? No, wrong - who you are every day is much more important. But first impressions are definitely not unimportant either. Make sure to introduce yourself correctly, as it could mean the difference between getting a job offer or a polite refusal from an employer. FinnishPod101 shows you how to read, write and pronounce these self-introductions and conversation-starters like a native speaker!

    But first, a tip - wait to be asked before offering personal details such as your age. Good conversation is about unspoken reciprocity, and giving too many personal details too soon can be embarrassing for your Finnish friend. Rather use phrases that encourage your friend to talk about him or herself - most people like doing that! Also, it shows you take real interest in other people.

    1- Hello, it’s nice to meet you.

    Hei, hauska tavata.

    This phrase is an excellent way to start an introduction. It is a greeting that immediately expresses interest in the other person.

    2- My name is Ella.

    Nimeni on Ella.

    Self-explanatory - just replace ‘Ella’ with your own name! Also, pay close attention to what your new Finnish acquaintance’s name is. Remembering it will make them feel that you are really interested in him/her as a person!

    Countries

    3- I’m from the Finland.

    Olen kotoisin Suomesta.

    Sharing something about yourself is a nice conversation starter. It shows that you’re willing to engage meaningfully with the other person. In an informal setting, you can expect the other person to respond in kind. At work, this is probably information you need to volunteer only if asked. Again, remember to replace ‘Finland’ with your own country of birth!

    4- I live in Helsinki.

    Asun Helsingissä.

    Same as above - replace ‘Helsinki’ with your town or city of abode!

    5- I’ve been learning Finnish for a year.

    Olen opiskellut vuoden verran suomea.

    Say this only if it’s true, obviously. And prepare to dazzle your audience! If you have indeed worked faithfully at your Finnish for a year, you should be pretty good at it! Use this phrase after your introduction - it is likely to indicate that you wish to engage in Finnish conversation.

    Two people talking

    6- I’m learning Finnish at FinnishPod101.com.

    Opettelen suomea FinnishPod101.com-sivustolla.

    This will be the best reply if anyone asks (Very impressed, of course!) where you study Finnish! Simply volunteering this information, especially in a casual conversation, could make you sound like a salesperson, and you want to avoid that. Often, an employer will want this information though, so best to memorize and have this phrase handy!

    7- I’m 27 years old.

    Olen 27-vuotias.

    This is a line that may just get you a ‘TMI!’ look from a stranger if you volunteer it without being asked. He/she may not be willing to divulge such an intimate detail about him/herself right at the start of your acquaintance, so don’t force reciprocity. However, it’s a good phrase to know in a job interview; again, probably best only if your prospective Finnish employer asks. Also, remember to give your true age!

    First encounter

    8- I’m a teacher.

    Olen opettaja.

    You’re still offering information about yourself, which lends good momentum to keep the conversation going! Replace ‘teacher’ with your own occupation - and learn the related vocabulary with FinnishPod101!

    People with different jobs

    9- One of my hobbies is reading.

    Yksi harrastuksistani on lukeminen.

    Your hobby is another topic with lots of potential for starting a good conversation! People are often eager to talk about their hobbies, and why they like them!

    10- I enjoy listening to music.

    Nautin musiikin kuuntelusta.

    If you’re still talking about your hobbies, this would be a good line to go with the previous one. Otherwise, wait for your conversation partner to start talking about what they enjoy doing!

    2. Important Tips for Introducing Yourself

    Introducing yourself

    A correct Finnish introduction will make a good impression upon meeting a person for the first time. Why is this first impression important? Simple - it gives an indication of who you are as a person. So, while you want to be truthful when representing yourself, you also need to be prepared to put your best foot forward!

    First impressions are often lingering and difficult to change. In addition, it’s easier to make a negative impression than a good one, often without intending to. So, how can you make sure that your self-introduction will impress Finnish natives?

    1- Research: First, research the culture! Different cultures have different social rules, and you will be halfway towards making a great first impression if you know the proper Finnish customs for self-introductions. It will also help you avoid social mistakes - sometimes, what is acceptable in one culture is insulting in another, such as making eye contact, or giving a handshake. In your culture, what is appropriate when a person introduces him or herself?

    Also, be sure to distinguish between introductions in different situations, such as a formal and a social situation. There are bound to be differences in how you address people! The internet can be an important tool for this endeavor. Alternatively, you could visit your local library to search for books on this topic, or you could ask Finnish friends to explain and demonstrate their cultural habits for introductions. Honoring someone’s culture shows that you respect it, and as we know - a little respect can go a very long way in any relationship!

    Someone studying

    2- Study the Correct Phrases and Vocabulary: Be sure to learn Finnish phrases and vocabulary that tell people who you are, and that encourage them to engage in conversation with you. Each situation will determine how to address the person you want to introduce yourself to. Also, make sure your pronunciation is correct! It would be most valuable to have Finnish-speaking friends who can help you with this. Or read on for a quick phrase and video lesson on Finnish introductions right here at FinnishPod101!

    3- Appearance: This is pretty obvious - if you want to make a good impression introducing yourself to anyone for the first time, you need to be neatly dressed and well groomed! A shabby, dirty or careless appearance and bad body odor are to be avoided at all costs; in most cultures, these will not impress!

    Also, make sure to dress appropriately, not only for the occasion, but also for the culture. For instance, bare shoulders or an open-necked shirt is an acceptable gear in many Western countries. Yet, in some cultures, dressing like this could deeply offend your host. No amount of good manners and properly expressed introductions is likely to wipe out a cultural no-no! So, be sure to know how to dress, and take care with your appearance when you are about to introduce yourself to someone for the first time!

    Following are some neat phrases with which you can introduce yourself in Finnish, and get a conversation started too!

    3. Video - How to Introduce Yourself in Finnish

    Good, you read and perhaps even memorized the preceding phrases to successfully introduce yourself in Finnish! Watch this short video now to get a quick lesson on Finnish grammar for these introductions, as well as how to pronounce them correctly. You will sound like a native when you can copy the presenter perfectly!


    4. Why FinnishPod101 is Perfect for Learning all about Finnish Introductions

    • Culturally Focused Lessons: All our material is aimed not only to help you learn perfect Finnish, but also to introduce you to the Finnish culture! Learn here, for instance, a list of favorite Finnish foods. Alternatively, listen to these audio lessons on Finnish culture! Studying through us could be very valuable before visiting Finland for any purpose.
    • Accurate and Correct Pronunciation & Inflection: Our hosts and voice actors are native Finnish speakers of the best quality! It is important for us that you speak Finnish correctly to avoid embarrassing misunderstandings and miscommunications. If you practice and can copy these presenters well, you will sound just like Finnish natives and your introduction will be easily understood!
    • State-of-the-Art Lesson Formats and Methods: Efficacy in learning is our highest priority. You will have access to learning tools that were carefully developed by learning specialists over more than a decade! We use only well-researched, proven lesson formats and teaching methods to ensure fast, accurate, fun and easy learning! Millions of happy subscribers can’t be wrong! Create a lifetime account with FinnishPod101 for free access to many learning tools that are updated every week.
    • Learn to Read and Write in Finnish: We don’t only teach you to speak, you can also learn to read and write in Finnish! This way you can express your Finnish introduction in more than one way and be thoroughly prepared.
    • A Learning Plan that Suits your Pocket: FinnishPod101 takes pride in making learning not only easy and fun, but also affordable. Opening a lifetime account for free will offer you a free seven-day trial, after which you can join with an option that suits your needs and means. Learning Finnish has never been easier or more affordable! Even choosing only the ‘Basic’ option will give you access to everything you need to learn Finnish effectively, like thousands of audio and video lessons! However, if you need to learn Finnish fast, the Premium and Premium Plus options will be good to consider, as both offer a vast number of extra tools to ensure efficient learning. This way you can be sure that you will reach your learning goal easily!

    Whatever your needs are for learning Finnish, make sure to do it through FinnishPod101, and you will never have to google: “How do I introduce myself in Finnish” again!

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    How to Celebrate Easter in Finland

    The Monday after Easter (Easter Monday) is Finland’s largest celebration during the Easter week. It’s a day of Finnish Easter pudding and more delicious traditional Finnish Easter food. However, it’s also a day of great religious significance for Finland’s Christian population. From its more religious celebrations to Easter witches, Easter in Finland is a delight!

    Learn about Finland Easter traditions and more information about Easter in Finland with FinnishPod101.com! We hope to make learning about Finnish Easter both fun and informative; after all, cultural knowledge is a vital aspect of learning any language! So let’s get started.

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    1. What is Easter Monday in Finland?

    Easter, which is celebrated in-between March and April in Finland, is the oldest and most important Christian holiday.

    Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus, but many Easter traditions of the Finns were originally pagan and are associated with the longer days. Easter week, which is also known as Silent Week, starts with Palm Sunday. The Easter holidays consist of Good Friday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday.

    2. When is Easter Monday?

    Daffodil Against White Background

    The date of Easter Monday in Finland varies from year to year. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

    • 2019: April 22
    • 2020: April 13
    • 2021: April 5
    • 2022: April 18
    • 2023: April 10
    • 2024: April 1
    • 2025: April 21
    • 2026: April 6
    • 2027: March 29
    • 2028: April 17

    3. Reading Practice: How is Celebrated?

    Large Festive Dinner

    How is Easter celebrated in Finland? Read the Finnish text below to find out (and find the English translation directly below it)!

    Palmusunnuntaina lapset pukeutuvat pääsiäisnoidiksi ja lähtevät naapurustoon virpomaan, mukanaan koristelemansa värikkäät pajunoksat. Virpoja toivottaa onnea ja terveyttä pajunoksia heiluttamalla ja lausumalla samaan aikaan virpomislorun. Palkaksi pienet noidat saavat yleensä suklaamunia tai muita makeisia. Koristellut pajunoksat symboloivat palmusunnuntain palmunlehviä ja kevään saapumista. Pajunkissoja ja koivunoksia laitetaan myös kodeissa maljakkoon esille, sekä rairuohoa kasvatetaan kevään ja elämän juhlistamiseksi.

    Mämmi on kaikista perinteisin suomalainen pääsiäisherkku. Se on imellettyä, makeaa ruispuuroa, joka valmistetaan ruismaltaasta ja ruisjauhoista. Mämmi tarjoillaan yleensä kuohukerman, maidon tai vaniljajäätelön kanssa. Pasha puolestaan on rahkajälkiruoka, joka on levinnyt suomalaisten pääsiäispöytiin ortodoksien perinteestä. Pääsiäiseen kuuluvat myös pieniä leluja sisältävät suklaamunat ja pääsiäisrakeet. Suolaisia herkkuja ovat erilaiset lammas- ja kalaruoat, verimakkara ja uunijuusto.

    Aiemmin uskottiin, että juuri pääsiäisenä hyvät ja pahat voimat taistelevat keskenään. Savun ja kipinöiden uskottiin karkottavan noitia ja pahoja henkiä, joten pääsiäislauantaina sytytettiin suuria rovioita, eli pääsiäiskokkoja.

    On Palm Sunday, children dress up as Easter witches and go around the neighborhood to do virpominen, carrying colorful willow branches they have decorated themselves. The person conducting the virpominen, known as the virpoja, gives wishes of happiness and good health while waving the willow branches, and reciting a rhyme called virpomisloru, to the receiver. As a reward, the little witches usually receive chocolate eggs or other sweets. The embellished willow branches symbolize the palm leaves from Palm Sunday and the arrival of spring. Willow catkins and birch twigs are also placed in a vase in homes, and Easter rye grass is grown to celebrate spring and life.

    Mämmi is the most traditional Finnish Easter delicacy. It is malted, sweet rye porridge which is prepared from rye malts and rye flour. Mämmi is usually served with whipped cream, milk, or vanilla ice cream. Pasha, in turn, is a curd dessert that has spread to Finnish Easter tables from the Orthodox tradition. Chocolate eggs that contain small toys and Easter drops are also a part of Easter. Savory delicacies include different kinds of lamb and fish dishes, blood sausage, and baked cheese.

    It was previously believed that during Easter, good and evil forces would fight each other. Smoke and sparks were believed to expel witches and evil spirits, so large stakes and Easter bonfires were lit on Easter Saturday.

    4. Additional Information

    Do you know any other names the “Holy Week” can go by?
    Holy Week is also known as a Silent Week or Torment Week, and each day has its own special name, Palm Sunday, Beam Monday, Holy Tuesday, Holy Wednesday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday.

    5. Must-know Finnish Vocab for Easter Monday

    Purple Easter eggs in Ryegrass

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Easter Monday in Finland!

    • Tipu — “Chick”
    • Kristinusko — “Christianity”
    • Toinen pääsiäispäivä — “Easter Monday”
    • Ilmestyä — “Appear”
    • Opetuslapsi — “Disciple”
    • Vapaapäivä — “Day off”
    • Juhla-ateria — “Festive dinner
    • Narsissi — “Daffodil”
    • Rairuoho — “Ryegrass
    • Koivunoksa — “Birch twig”
    • Ylösnousemus — “Resurrection”

    To hear each word pronounced, check out our Finnish Easter Monday vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    What do you think about the Finnish celebration of Easter? Are Easter celebrations similar in your country, or different? Let us know in the comments!

    To learn even more about Finnish culture and the language, visit us at FinnishPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community to discuss lessons with fellow Finnish learners. You can also take advantage of our MyTeacher program, and learn Finnish with your own personal teacher, by upgrading to a Premium Plus account!

    All of your efforts will soon reap rewards, and you’ll be speaking like a native in no time! And we’ll be here to teach you and support you all the way there! Best wishes and happy Easter (be sure to enjoy some Finnish chocolate Easter eggs for us)!

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    How to Say I Love You in Finnish - Romantic Word List

    Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Finnish could be just what you need to find it.

    Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Finnish partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At FinnishPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Finnish lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Finnish dating easy for you.

    Table of Contents

    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
    4. Finnish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
    5. Finnish Quotes about Love
    6. Marriage Proposal Lines
    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
    8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Finnish Faster?

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    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

    So, you have met your Finnish love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Finnish word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Finnish date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

    Finnish Date Phrases

    Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

    • Haluaisitko mennä ulos syömään kanssani?

    The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Finnish is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

    Are you free this weekend?

    • Oletko vapaa tänä viikonloppuna?

    This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

    Would you like to hang out with me?

    • Haluaisitko hengailla kanssani?

    You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

    What time shall we meet tomorrow?

    • Mihin aikaan tapaisimme huomenna?

    Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

    Where shall we meet?

    • Missä tapaisimme?

    You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

    You look great.

    • Näytät hyvältä.

    A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

    You are so cute.

    • Olet niin söpö.

    If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

    What do you think of this place?

    • Mitä mieltä olet tästä paikasta?

    This another good conversation starter. Show off your Finnish language skills!

    Can I see you again?

    • Voinko tavata sinut uudelleen?

    So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

    Shall we go somewhere else?

    • Mentäisiinkö jonnekin muualle?

    If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

    I know a good place.

    • Tiedän hyvän paikan.

    Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

    I will drive you home.

    • Ajan sinut kotiin.

    If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

    That was a great evening.

    • Se oli hieno ilta.

    This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

    When can I see you again?

    • Milloin voin nähdä sinut uudestaan?

    If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

    I’ll call you.

    • Soitan sinulle.

    Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

    You learned all the Finnish phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Finnish below!

    Date Ideas in Finnish

    museum

    • museo

    If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

    candlelit dinner

    • kynttiläillallinen

    A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

    go to the zoo

    • mennä eläintarhaan

    This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

    go for a long walk

    • mennä pitkälle kävelylle

    Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

    go to the opera

    • mennä oopperaan

    This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

    go to the aquarium

    • mennä merimaailmaan

    Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

    walk on the beach

    • kävellä rannalla

    This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

    have a picnic

    • pitää piknik

    If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

    cook a meal together

    • laittaa ateria yhdessä

    If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

    have dinner and see a movie

    • illastaa ja katsoa elokuva

    This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

    Valentine's Day Words in Finnish

    Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Finnish - think how impressed your date will be!

    4. Finnish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

    So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Finnish yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Finnish? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Finnish love on this special day!

    Valentine's Day Words in Finnish

    I love you.

    • Rakastan sinua.

    Saying ‘I love you’ in Finnish carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

    You mean so much to me.

    • Merkitset minulle niin paljon.

    This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

    Will you be my Valentine?

    • Olisitko minun ystävänpäivän rakas?

    With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

    You’re so beautiful.

    • Olet niin kaunis.

    If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Finnish, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

    I think of you as more than a friend.

    • Ajattelen sinua enemmän kuin ystävänä.

    Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Finnish dating culture.

    A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

    • Sata sydäntä ei ole tarpeeksi kuljettamaan kaikki rakkauteni sinulle.

    You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

    Love is just love. It can never be explained.

    • Rakkaus on vain rakkautta. Sitä ei voi koskaan selittää.

    If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

    You’re so handsome.

    • Olet niin komea.

    Ladies, this phrase lets your Finnish love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

    I’ve got a crush on you.

    • Olen ihastunut sinuun.

    If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

    You make me want to be a better man.

    • Saat minut haluamaan olla parempi mies.

    Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Finnish girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

    Let all that you do be done in love.

    • Olkoon kaikki mitä teet tehtävä rakastuneena.

    We hope.

    You are my sunshine, my love.

    • Olet päivänsäteeni, rakkaani.

    A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

    Words can’t describe my love for you.

    • Sanat eivät riitä kuvaamaan rakkauttani sinua kohtaan.

    Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

    We were meant to be together.

    • Meidät oli tarkoitettu yhteen.

    This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

    If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

    • Jos ajattelit jotakuta lukiessasi tätä, olet varmasti rakastunut.

    Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

    5. Finnish Quotes about Love

    Finnish Love Quotes

    You’re a love champ! You and your Finnish lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Finnish that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

    6. Marriage Proposal Lines

    Finnish Marriage Proposal Lines

    Wow. Your Finnish lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Finnish custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

    Finnish Break-Up Lines

    Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Meidän täytyy puhua.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Kyse ei ole sinusta. Vaan minusta.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Finnish lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • En vain ole valmis tällaiseen suhteeseen.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Ollaan vain ystäviä.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Finnish, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Minusta tuntuu, että tarvitsemme tauon.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Ansaitset parempaa.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Meidän pitäisi tapailla muita ihmisiä.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Tarvitsen tilaa.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Mielestäni etenemme liian nopeasti.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Minun täytyy keskittyä uraani.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • En ole tarpeeksi hyvä sinulle.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • En vain rakasta sinua enää.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Emme vain ole sopivat toisillemme.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Se on parempi niin.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Olemme kasvaneet erilleen.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Finnish faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. FinnishPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Finnish language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Finnish Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Finnish speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    FinnishPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Finnish, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Finnish even faster.

    2- Having your Finnish romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Finnish language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Finnish lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Finnish partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why FinnishPod101 helps you learn Finnish Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Finnish is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at FinnishPod101 is translated into both English and Finnish. So, while your partner can help you learn Finnish faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Finnish Culture
    At FinnishPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Finland. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Finnish partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Finnish Phrases
    You now have access to FinnishPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Finnish soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    Runeberg Paiva: Celebrate the Day of Johan Ludvig Runeberg!

    Day of Johan Ludvig Runeberg

    Johan Ludvig Runeberg was Swedish-Finnish and is known for his writing and poetry. He was born on February 5, 1804 and died on May 6, 1877. Runeberg rose to the status of Finland’s national poet during his lifetime, due to his work being very “patriotic,” or isänmaallinen.

    Runeberg has received numerous awards for his work and is highly honored in Finnish culture. Thus, by learning about Runeberg Paiva you’ll get a nice look at Finland’s history and its values. It’s our wish at FinnishPod101.com to help you learn all you need to know about Finnish culture, and this famous Finnish poet is no exception.

    So, who was Runeberg and what is Runeberg Paiva?

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    1. What is the Day of J.L. Runeberg?

    Runeberg’s best-known work is “The Tales of Ensign Stål,” or in Finnish Vänrikki Stoolin tarinat, which is a collection of Johan Ludvig Runeberg poems which commemorate the Finnish war. The opening poem of the work was later composed to become the “Finnish national anthem,” or Suomen kansallislaulu, called Maamme which means “Our Land.”

    Runeberg’s poems were written in Swedish and dealt largely with life in rural Finland. Another famous poem of his, “Bonden Paavo,” or “Farmer Paavo,” is about a poor farmer who persevered despite years of difficult climates and poor harvests. The farmer fights off starvation by mixing bark into his bread. After several years, he finally reaps a rich harvest. Despite assurances from God that he can now eat bread made solely from grain, the farmer continues to mix bark into his bread in order to share the bounty with his struggling neighbor.

    Runeberg has received numerous national accolades including a day dedicated in his honor. Runeberg’s home, located in the center of Porvoo, was the first museum house in Finland. In addition, a number of monuments and memorials have been erected in his honor, and numerous streets, squares, and parks have been named after him.

    For example, there is a Runeberg street in Helsinki and a Runeberg park in his birth city of Jakobstad. One of Finland’s most prominent “literary awards,” or kirjallisuuspalkinto in Finnish, the Runeberg Prize, was also established in his honor.

    Further, Runeberg has been memorialized with a commemorative coin to celebrate the 200th anniversary of his birth. The coin was minted in 2004, and features Runeberg’s portrait on one side and a font from a Swedish newspaper on the reverse.

    Thus, it’s clear why Runeberg is so highly regarded by the Finnish people. Enough so that there’s a day held each year in his honor: The Day of J.L. Runeberg or Runeberg Paiva.

    2. When is it?

    February 5

    Each year, the Finnish people celebrate the famous Finnish poet J.L. Runeberg on the date of his birth, February 5.

    3. How is it Celebrated?

    Runeberg Tarts

    Runeberg’s Day is a well-established “flag day,” or liputuspäivä. Literary-themed events are held this day at places such as bookstores and cafes. Further, the Runeberg Prize mentioned earlier is fittingly awarded on this day in Porvoo.

    A well-known way to celebrate the day is to eat “Runeberg tarts,” or Runebergintorttuja, which are sweet pastries said to have been Runeberg’s favorite treat. The baked goods are usually available in grocery stores and cafes from January up until the day of J.L. Runeberg. Some of the cafes in Porvoo offer the pastries all year round.

    The cylindrical shaped, arrack- or rum-flavored tarts contain wheat flour, bread crumbs, cookie crumbs, and almonds, and they are decorated with raspberry jam and icing. (Do we need to wait until Runeberg Paiva to eat these?!)

    4. Additional Information

    It’s said that Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife, Fredrika Runeberg, developed the pastry mentioned above for her sweet-toothed husband from whatever ingredients she could find in the pantry.

    She was also a distinguished writer; she was the first Finnish historical novel writer, achieving popularity through her short stories as well as her novels. Talk about a great match!

    4. Reading Practice: Fredrika Runeberg

    Learn more about Johan Runeberg’s wife in the Finnish text below (the English translation is below):

    • Myös Johan Ludvig Runebergin vaimo Fredrika Runeberg oli ansioitunut kirjailija. Hän oli ensimmäisiä suomalaisia historiallisen romaanin kirjoittajia. Romaanien lisäksi hän saavutti suosiota lyhyillä kertomuksillaan.
    • Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife, Fredrika Runeberg, was also a distinguished writer. She was the first Finnish historical novel writer, achieving popularity through her short stories as well as her novels.

    It’s also said that Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s wife developed Runeberg tarts for her sweet-toothed husband from whatever ingredients she could find in the pantry. Yum!

    5. Must-know Vocab

    Man Sitting at Typewriter with Drink

    Here’s some vocabulary for you to go over in order to fully understand this Finnish holiday and celebrate it to its fullest.

    • päivä — “day”
    • runoilija — “poet”
    • kirjailija — “writer”
    • toimittaja — “journalist”
    • kansallisrunoilija — “national poet”
    • kansallislaulu — “national anthem”
    • torttu — “tart”
    • manteli — “almond”
    • rommi — “rum”
    • liputuspäivä — “Flag Day”

    To hear the pronunciation of each word, be sure to check out our Finnish J.L. Runeberg Day vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied with an audio file so you can listen while you read.

    Conclusion

    As you can see, Johan Ludvig Runeberg was one of the most influential Finnish writers and his work holds great significance to the Finnish people. Thus, J.L. Runeberg Day is widely celebrated and held in reverence by many Fins.

    What do you think about Runeberg and the Finns’ celebration of him? Is there a famous writer or other influential person your country celebrates? Let us know in the comments!

    For more information on Finnish culture, visit us at FinnishPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, vocabulary lists on a variety of topics, and even an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow Finnish learners! You can even download our MyTeacher app to take advantage of a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal language teacher.

    We hope you enjoyed learning about this Finnish holiday, and that you’ll enjoy making Runeberg tarts even more! Until next time, good luck in your language-learning!

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    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Finnish

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Finnish!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Finnish Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can FinnishPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Finnish - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Finnish? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Finnish words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. joke - vitsailla
    2. funny - hauska
    3. lie - valehdella
    4. surprise - yllättää
    5. prankster - keppostelija
    6. prank - kepponen
    7. sneaky - ovela
    8. play a joke - höynäyttää
    9. humor - huumori
    10. fool - hölmö
    11. deceptive - petollinen
    12. April 1st - aprillipäivä

    2. Finnish Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Finnish Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Finnish to prank your favorite Finnish friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Finnish in 1 month.
      • Opin suomen kielen yhdessä kuukaudessa.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • Kaikki tunnit on tänään peruttu.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • Olen pahoillani, mutta rikoin juuri suosikkisilmälasisi.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • Joku törmäsi autoosi juuri.
    5. I’m getting married.
      • Olen menossa naimisiin.
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • Voitit vapaalipun.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • Näin autosi hinattavan pois.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • Rakennuksen edessä jaetaan ilmaisia lahjakortteja.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • Komea mies odottaa sinua ulkona.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • Kaunis nainen pyysi minua antamaan tämän puhelinnumeron sinulle.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • Voitko tulla alakertaan? Minulla on jotain erityistä sinulle
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • Kiitos rakkauskirjeestäsi tänä aamuna. En olisi koskaan voinut arvata tunteitasi.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Finnish, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can FinnishPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Finland, or if you work for any Finnish company, knowing the above Finnish prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Finnish words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

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    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Finnish - bone up your Finnish language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, FinnishPod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Finnish below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at FinnishPod101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Finnish - testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

    • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
    • To participate: Watch the video for instructions, and leave a comment to rate it. Your comment will make you eligible for large enrollment-fee discounts. To watch the video, please click the play button.

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    How to Say Happy New Year in Finnish & New Year Wishes

    Learn all the Finnish New Year wishes online, in your own time, on any device! Join FinnishPod101 for a special Finnish New Year celebration!

    How to Say Happy New Year in Finnish

    Can you relate to the year passing something like this: “January, February, March - December!”? Many people do! Quantum physics teaches us that time is relative, and few experiences illustrate this principle as perfectly as when we reach the end of a year. To most of us, it feels like the old one has passed in the blink of an eye, while the new year lies ahead like a very long journey! However, New Year is also a time to celebrate beginnings, and to say goodbye to what has passed. This is true in every culture, no matter when New Year is celebrated.

    So, how do you say Happy New Year in Finnish? Let a native teach you! At FinnishPod101, you will learn how to correctly greet your friends over New Year, and wish them well with these Finnish New Year wishes!

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    Table of Contents

    1. How to Celebrate New Year in Finland
    2. Must-Know Finnish Words & Phrases for the New Year!
    3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions in Finnish
    4. Inspirational New Year Quotes
    5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes
    6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages
    7. How FinnishPod101 Can Help You Learn Finnish

    But let’s start with some vocabulary for Finnish New Year celebrations, very handy for conversations.

    1. How to Celebrate New Year in Finland

    Like everywhere in the world, in Finland the New Year is one of the most important celebrations of the year. In Finland, the New Year celebration is focused mainly on New Year’s Eve or uudenvuodenaatto, that is, on the last day of December. New Year’s Day, uudenvuodenpäivä, on January 1, is a public holiday, when many people wind down at home with their families.

    Now, before we get into more detail, do you know the answer to this question-

    Do you know what dishes are typically associated with Finnish New Year?

    If you don’t already know, you’ll find out a bit later. Keep reading.

    Shops and offices typically close earlier than usual on New Year’s Eve, after which it’s time to concentrate on the celebrations for the coming year. Given Finns’ great love for saunas, relaxing in a sauna is often a vital part of a New Year’s Eve program in Finland. Many go to restaurants and clubs to celebrate the New Year, while more formal New Year’s celebrations include the opera and the theater.

    Some highlights of New Year’s celebrations include pewter casting, or tinan valaminen, and fireworks, or ilotulitteet. The horseshoe-shaped pewter pieces are melted in a metal ladle, after which the melted pewter is dropped into snow or water where it solidifies into a statuette. People observe the interesting shapes the statuette takes on, and use them to try to make predictions for the coming year. For example, a piece in the shape of a ship may foretell travel, and a lace-like surface may predict money. The fireworks portion of the festivities are greatly loved by all, especially children. In Finland, fireworks are allowed to be set off only between 6 pm and 2 am on the night of New Year’s Eve.

    Shops are closed during New Year’s Day, allowing everyone to spend the day peacefully with their families. The president of Finland also gives a traditional New Year’s speech, which is broadcast live on TV. Many Finns choose to watch the Vienna Philharmonic’s New Year’s concert on television. Making New Year’s resolutions or uudenvuodenlupaus, on New Year’s Day is one of the most popular traditions, encouraging people to look forward to the upcoming year. Resolutions usually revolve around changing bad habits, starting new hobbies, or setting goals.

    In the past, Finns celebrated the New Year as “Kekri,” a feast of harvest, during October or November. At the time, people would try to predict the future by throwing a bath whisk on the roof of a sauna, or by throwing hay on the roof purlins. The direction where the bath whisk would point would predict the future; if the stem was pointing towards the town church and graveyard, death was expected. But if the leaves were pointing towards the church, it meant marriage for the unmarried, and happiness for the married. On some occasions the stem was thought to point in the direction of the house of one’s future spouse. A similar tradition held that when a bundle of hay was thrown towards the roof purlins, one would ask a question at the same time—if most of the hay stayed on the purlins, the answer would be “yes”, if most of it fell back on the floor, the answer would be “no”.

    Now it’s time to answer our quiz question-

    Do you know what dishes are typically associated with Finnish New Year?

    The New Year is not a time to get stressed about cooking, so people try to focus on easy and delicious food instead. Surprisingly, potato salad and wieners are a primary part of the New Year’s menu for many Finns! The drink of choice is, of course, sparkling wine or champagne!

    Happy New Year!
    Hyvää uutta vuotta!

    2. Must-Know Finnish Words & Phrases for the New Year!

    Finnish Words & Phrases for the New Year

    1- Year

    vuosi

    This is pretty self-explanatory. Most countries follow a Gregorian calendar, which has approximately 365 days in a year, while in some cultures, other year designations are also honored. Therefore, New Year’s day in Finland could fall on a different day than in your country. When do you celebrate New Year?

    2- Midnight

    keskiyö

    The point in time when a day ends and a new one starts. Many New Year celebrants prefer to stay awake till midnight, and greet the new annum as it breaks with fanfare and fireworks!

    3- New Year’s Day

    uudenvuodenpäivä

    In most countries, the new year is celebrated for one whole day. On the Gregorian calendar, this falls on January 1st. On this day, different cultures engage in festive activities, like parties, parades, big meals with families and many more.

    You can do it!

    4- Party

    juhla

    A party is most people’s favorite way to end the old year, and charge festively into the new one! We celebrate all we accomplished in the old year, and joyfully anticipate what lies ahead.

    5- Dancing

    tanssi

    Usually, when the clock strikes midnight and the New Year officially begins, people break out in dance! It is a jolly way to express a celebratory mood with good expectations for the year ahead. Also, perhaps, that the old year with its problems has finally passed! Dance parties are also a popular way to spend New Year’s Eve in many places.

    6- Champagne

    samppanja

    Originating in France, champagne is a bubbly, alcoholic drink that is often used to toast something or someone during celebrations.

    7- Fireworks

    ilotulitus

    These are explosives that cause spectacular effects when ignited. They are popular for announcing the start of the new year with loud noises and colorful displays! In some countries, fireworks are set off to scare away evil spirits. In others, the use of fireworks is forbidden in urban areas due to their harmful effect on pets. Most animals’ hearing is much more sensitive than humans’, so this noisy display can be very frightful and traumatising to them.

    Happy Near Year!

    8- Countdown

    lähtölaskenta

    This countdown refers to New Year celebrants counting the seconds, usually backward, till midnight, when New Year starts - a great group activity that doesn’t scare animals, and involves a lot of joyful shouting when the clock strikes midnight!

    9- New Year’s Holiday

    uudenvuodenloma

    In many countries, New Year’s Day is a public holiday - to recuperate from the party the previous night, perhaps! Families also like to meet on this day to enjoy a meal and spend time together.

    10- Confetti

    konfetti

    In most Western countries, confetti is traditionally associated with weddings, but often it is used as a party decoration. Some prefer to throw it in the air at the strike of midnight on New Year’s Eve.

    11- New Year’s Eve

    uudenvuodenaatto

    This is the evening before New Year breaks at midnight! Often, friends and family meet for a party or meal the evening before, sometimes engaging in year-end rituals. How are you planning to give your New Year greetings in 2018?

    12- Toast

    nostaa malja

    A toast is a type of group-salutation that involves raising your glass to drink with others in honor of something or someone. A toast to the new year is definitely in order!

    13- Resolution

    uudenvuodenlupaus

    Those goals or intentions you hope to, but seldom keep in the new year! Many people consider the start of a new year to be the opportune time for making changes or plans. Resolutions are those intentions to change, or the plans. It’s best to keep your resolutions realistic so as not to disappoint yourself!

    14- Parade

    paraati

    New Year celebrations are a huge deal in some countries! Parades are held in the streets, often to celebratory music, with colorful costumes and lots of dancing. Parades are like marches, only less formal and way more fun. At FinnishPod101, you can engage in forums with natives who can tell you what Finnish New Year celebrations are like!

    3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions

    New Year’s Resolutions List

    So, you learned the Finnish word for ‘resolution’. Fabulous! Resolutions are those goals and intentions that we hope to manifest in the year that lies ahead. The beginning of a new year serves as a good marker in time to formalise these. Some like to do it in writing, others only hold these resolutions in their hearts. Here are our Top 10 New Year’s resolutions at FinnishPod101 - what are yours?

    Learn these phrases and impress your Finnish friends with your vocabulary.

    New Year's Resolutions

    1- Read more

    Lukea enemmän.

    Reading is a fantastic skill that everyone can benefit from. You’re a business person? Apparently, successful business men and women read up to 60 books a year. This probably excludes fiction, so better scan your library or Amazon for the top business reads if you plan to follow in the footsteps of the successful! Otherwise, why not make it your resolution to read more Finnish in the new year? You will be surprised by how much this will improve your Finnish language skills!

    2- Spend more time with family

    Viettää enemmän aikaa perheen kanssa.

    Former US President George Bush’s wife, Barbara Bush, was quoted as having said this: “At the end of your life, you will never regret not having passed one more test, not winning one more verdict, or not closing one more deal. You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, a parent.” This is very true! Relationships are often what gives life meaning, so this is a worthy resolution for any year.

    3- Lose weight

    Laihtua.

    Hands up, how many of you made this new year’s resolution last year too…?! This is a notoriously difficult goal to keep, as it takes a lot of self discipline not to eat unhealthily. Good luck with this one, and avoid unhealthy fad diets!

    4- Save money

    Säästää rahaa.

    Another common and difficult resolution! However, no one has ever been sorry when they saved towards reaching a goal. Make it your resolution to save money to upgrade your subscription to FinnishPod101’s Premium PLUS option in the new year - it will be money well spent!

    5- Quit smoking

    Lopettaa tupakoinnin.

    This is a resolution that you should definitely keep, or your body could punish you severely later! Smoking is a harmful habit with many hazardous effects on your health. Do everything in your power to make this resolution come true in the new year, as your health is your most precious asset.

    6- Learn something new

    Oppia jotain uutta.

    Science has proven that learning new skills can help keep brain diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s at bay! It can even slow down the progression of the disease. So, keep your brain healthy by learning to speak a new language, studying towards a qualification, learning how to sew, or how to play chess - no matter how old you are, the possibilities are infinite!

    7- Drink less

    Juoda vähemmän.

    This is another health resolution that is good to heed any time of the year. Excessive drinking is associated with many diseases, and its effect can be very detrimental to good relationships too. Alcohol is a poison and harmful for the body in large quantities!

    8- Exercise regularly

    Harrastaa liikuntaa säännöllisesti.

    This resolution goes hand-in-hand with ‘Lose weight’! An inactive body is an unhealthy and often overweight one, so give this resolution priority in the new year.

    9- Eat healthy

    Syödä terveellisesti.

    If you stick with this resolution, you will lose weight and feel better in general. It is a very worthy goal to have!

    10- Study Finnish with FinnishPod101

    Opiskelen suomea FinnishPod101.comin kanssa.

    Of course! You can only benefit from learning Finnish, especially with us! Learning how to speak Finnish can keep your brain healthy, it can widen your circle of friends, and improve your chances to land a dream job anywhere in the world. FinnishPod101 makes it easy and enjoyable for you to stick to this resolution.

    4. Inspirational New Year Quotes

    Inspirational Quotes

    Everyone knows that it is sometimes very hard to stick to resolutions, and not only over New Year. The reasons for this vary from person to person, but all of us need inspiration every now and then! A good way to remain motivated is to keep inspirational quotes near as reminders that it’s up to us to reach our goals.

    Click here for quotes that will also work well in a card for a special Finnish new year greeting!

    Make decorative notes of these in Finnish, and keep them close! Perhaps you could stick them above your bathroom mirror, or on your study’s wall. This way you not only get to read Finnish incidentally, but also remain inspired to reach your goals! Imagine feeling like giving up on a goal, but reading this quote when you go to the bathroom: “It does not matter how slowly you go, as long as you do not stop.” What a positive affirmation!

    5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes

    Language Learning Quotes

    Still undecided whether you should enroll with FinnishPod101 to learn a new language? There’s no time like the present to decide! Let the following Language Learning Quotes inspire you with their wisdom.

    Click here to read the most inspirational Language Learning Quotes!

    As legendary President Nelson Mandela once said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.” So, learning how to say Happy New Year in Finnish could well be a way into someone special’s heart for you! Let this year be the one where you to learn how to say Happy New Year, and much more, in Finnish - it could open many and unexpected doors for you.

    6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages

    Here’s a lovely bonus for you! Why stop with Finnish - learn how to say Happy New Year in 31 other languages too! Watch this video and learn how to pronounce these New Year’s wishes like a native in under two minutes.

    7. Why Enrolling with FinnishPod101 Would Be the Perfect New Year’s Gift to Yourself!

    If you are unsure how to celebrate the New Year, why not give yourself a huge gift, and enroll to learn Finnish! With more than 12 years of experience behind us, we know that FinnishPod101 would be the perfect fit for you. There are so many reasons for this!

    Learning Paths

    • Custom-tailored Learning Paths: Start learning Finnish at the level that you are. We have numerous Learning Pathways, and we tailor them just for you based on your goals and interests! What a boon!
    • Marked Progress and Fresh Learning Material Every Week: We make new lessons available every week, with an option to track your progress. Topics are culturally appropriate and useful, such as “Learning how to deliver negative answers politely to a business partner.” Our aim is to equip you with Finnish that makes sense!
    • Multiple Learning Tools: Learn in fun, easy ways with resources such 1,000+ video and audio lessons, flashcards, detailed PDF downloads, and mobile apps suitable for multiple devices!
    • Fast Track Learning Option: If you’re serious about fast-tracking your learning, Premium Plus would be the perfect way to go! Enjoy perks such as personalised lessons with ongoing guidance from your own, native-speaking teacher, and one-on-one learning on your mobile app! You will not be alone in your learning. Weekly assignments with non-stop feedback, answers and corrections will ensure speedy progress.
    • Fun and Easy: Keeping the lessons fun and easy-to-learn is our aim, so you will stay motivated by your progress!

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    There’s no reason not to go big in 2018 by learning Finnish with FinnishPod101. Just imagine how the world can open up for you!

    How To Say ‘Thank you’ in Finnish

    How to Say Thank You in Finnish

    In most cultures, it is custom to express gratitude in some way or another. The dictionary defines gratitude as follows: it is “the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness”. Giving a sincere, thankful response to someone’s actions or words is often the ‘glue’ that keeps relationships together. This is true in most societies! Doing so in a foreign country also shows your respect and appreciation for the culture. Words have great power - use these ones sincerely and often!

    Table of Contents

    1. 12 Ways to say ‘Thank you’ in Finnish
    2. Video Lesson: Learn to Say ‘Thank You’ in 3 Minutes
    3. Infographic & Audio Lesson: Survival Phrases - Thank You
    4. Video Lesson: ‘Thank You’ in 31 Languages
    5. How FinnishPod101 Can Help You

    So, how do you say ‘Thank you’ in Finnish? You can learn easily! Below, FinnishPod101 brings you perfect translations and pronunciation as you learn the most common ways Finnish speakers say ‘Thanks’ in various situations.

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    1. 12 Ways to say ‘Thank you’ in Finnish

    1- Thank you.

    Kiitos.

    The magical words that can bring a smile to any face. For one day, truly mean it whenever you say these words, and see how this lifts your spirit too!

    2- That’s very kind of you.

    Se on erittäin ystävällistä sinulta.

    This phrase is appropriate when someone clearly goes out of their way to give good service, or to offer you a kindness.

    3- Thanks for your kind words!

    Kiitos ystävällisistä sanoistasi!

    Someone paid you a compliment and made you feel good? That is kind of him/her, so express your gratitude!

    4- Thank you for coming today.

    Kiitos, että tulitte tänään.

    This welcoming phrase should be part of your arsenal if you’re conducting more formal meetings with Finnish speakers. If you’re hosting a party, this is also a good phrase when you greet your Finnish guests!

    5- Thank you for your consideration.

    Kiitos harkinnastanne.

    This is a more formal, almost solemn way to thank someone for their thoughtfulness and sensitivity towards you. It is also suitable to use when a native speaker has to consider something you submit, like a job application, a project or a proposal. You are thanking them, in essence, for time and effort they are about to, or have spent on your submission.

    6- Thanks a lot!

    Kiitos paljon!

    This means the same as ‘Thank you’, but with energy and enthusiasm added! It means almost the same as ‘thank you so much’ in Finnish. Use this in an informal setting with your Finnish friends or teachers.

    7- Teachers like you are not easy to find.

    Sinun kaltaisiasi opettajia ei ole helppo löytää.

    Some phrases are compliments, which express gratitude by inference. This is one of them. If you’re particularly impressed with your FinnishPod101 teacher, this is an excellent phrase to memorize!

    8- Thank you for spending time with us.

    Kiitos, että vietitte aikaa kanssamme.

    Any host at a gathering with Finnish speakers, such as a meeting or a party, should have this under his/her belt! Use it when you’re saying goodbye or busy closing a meeting. It could also be another lovely way to thank your Finnish language teacher for her time.

    9- Thank you for being patient and helping me improve.

    Kiitos, että olet kärsivällinen ja autat minua kehittymään.

    This phrase is another sure way to melt any formal or informal Finnish teacher’s heart! Teaching is not easy, and often a lot of patience is required from the teacher. Thank him/her for it! It’s also a good phrase to use if you work in Finland, and want to thank your trainer or employer. You will go a long way towards making yourself a popular employee - gratitude is the most attractive trait in any person!

    10- You’re the best teacher ever!

    Olet paras opettaja ikinä!

    This is also an enthusiastic way to thank your teacher by means of a compliment. It could just make their day!

    11- Thank you for the gift.

    Kiitos lahjasta.

    This is a good phrase to remember when you’re the lucky recipient of a gift. Show your respect and gratitude with these words.

    12- I have learned so much thanks to you.

    Olen oppinut niin paljon sinun ansiostasi.

    What a wonderful compliment to give a good teacher! It means they have succeeded in their goal, and you’re thankful for it.

    2. Video Lesson: Learn to Say ‘Thank You’ in 3 Minutes

    Wherever your destination may be, manners are a must! And in this respect, Finland is no different.

    1- Kiitos.
    In Finnish, “Thank you” is kiitos.

    2- Kiitos paljon.
    You can emphasize kiitos by adding paljon, which literally means, “a lot.” You could say kiitos paljon, which would be equivalent to “Thanks a lot,” a more polite expression than just kiitos.

    3- Paljon kiitoksia.
    There will be occasions where you will really want to show your appreciation and politeness. During occasions such as these, you can use the adverb paljon and kiitoksia, which is a plural and partitive case of the noun kiitos. So, “Many thanks” in Finnish is Paljon kiitoksia. The first word paljon (”a lot” ) is used to make the phrase more polite. This is followed by kiitoksia, which literally means something like “thanks.”

    Cultural Insights

    Quick Tip 1

    By far, kiitos is the most common way to say “Thank you.” Use the more polite version kiitos paljon sparingly, in very special situations like when you have been helped a lot by somebody. Remember, when in doubt, keeping it simple is always your safest bet. You don’t have to worry about formal or informal situations; kiitos can be used with just about anyone, anywhere, and anytime. You say kiitos when the waiter brings your food or drinks, when the clerk in the hotel takes your luggage to your room, and when somebody welcomes you or congratulates you. No matter his/her profession or age, kiitos will always be an appropriate response.

    Quick Tip 2

    If you are around friends, you might hear shorter versions of kiitos, like kiitti. This means “thanks,” or “cheers.” It is mostly used among young people and is very informal. If you know the people well enough, feel free to throw one of these in—your knowledge of informal Finnish will surely be appreciated.

    On the run to Finland? Wait! You can’t go without some basic language phrases under your belt! Especially if you’re heading to meet your prospective employer! Either in person or online, knowing how to say ‘Thank you’ in the Finnish language will only improve their impression of you! FinnishPod101 saves you time with this short lesson that nevertheless packs a punch. Learn to say ‘Thank you’ in Finnish in no time!

    3. Audio Lesson: Survival Phrases - Thank You

    5 Ways to Say Thank You in Finnish

    Perhaps you think it’s unimportant that you don’t know what ‘Thank you’ is in Finnish, or that it’s too difficult a language to learn. Yet, as a traveler or visitor, you will be surprised at how far you can go using a little bit of Finnish in Finland!

    Click Here to Listen to the Free Audio Lesson!

    At FinnishPod101, we offer you a few ways of saying ‘Thank you’ in Finnish that you have no excuse not knowing, as they’re so simple and easy to learn. The lesson is geared to aid your ‘survival’ in formal and informal situations in Finland, so don’t wait! You will never have to google ‘How do you say thanks in Finnish’ again…!

    4. ‘Thank You’ in 31 Languages

    For the global traveler in a hurry, here are 31 ways to say ‘Thank you’! These are the first words you need to learn in any foreign language - it is sure to smooth your way with native speakers by showing your gratitude for services rendered, and your respect for their culture! Learn and know how to correctly say ‘Thank you’ in 31 different languages in this short video.

    5. Why would FinnishPod101 be the perfect choice to learn Finnish?

    However, you need not stop at ‘Thank you’ in Finnish - why not learn to speak the language?! You have absolutely nothing to lose. Research has shown that learning a new language increases intelligence and combats brain-aging. Also, the ability to communicate with native speakers in their own language is an instant way to make friends and win respect! Or imagine you know how to write ‘Thank you’ to that special Finnish friend after a date…he/she will be so impressed!

    Thank You

    FinnishPod101 Has Special Lessons, Tools and Resources to Teach You How to Say Thank You and Other Key Phrases

    With more than a decade of experience behind us, we have taught thousands of satisfied users to speak foreign languages. How do we do this? First, we take the pain out of learning! At FinnishPod101, students are assisted as they master vocabulary, pronunciation, and conversation through state-of-the-art and fun online learning methods. A library replete with learning resources allows for you to learn at your own pace and in your own space! Resources include thousands of video and audio recordings, downloadable PDF lessons and plenty of learning apps for your mobile devices. Each month, we add benefits with FREE bonuses and gifts to improve your experience.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    We accommodate all levels and types of learners, from Absolute Beginner to Advanced, and FinnishPod101 is free for anyone to sign up. However, you can choose to fast track your fluency with lesson customization and increased interactive learning and practicing. Upgrade to Premium, or Premium PLUS to enhance your experience and greatly expedite your learning. With this type of assistance, and pleasurable effort on your part, you will speak Finnish in a very short period of time!

    Click Here to Visit FinnishPod101!

    Best of all is that you’re never alone! We believe that practice is the holy grail of learning any new language, and we gear our courses to ensure lots of it. Enroll with us, and you gain immediate access to our lively forum where we meet and greet, and discuss your burning questions. Our certified teachers are friendly and helpful, and you are very likely to practice your first ‘Thanks!’ in Finnish on him/her, AND mean it! Hurry up, and sign up now - you will thank us for it.

    How to Start Thinking in Finnish

    Learn 4 tools and techniques to stop translating in your head and start thinking in Finnish

    Going through Finnish lessons is enough to get by and learn the basics of Finnish, but to truly become fluent you need to be able to think in Finnish. This will allow you to have conversations with ease, read smoothly, and comprehensively understand natives. To do this, you need to go beyond just completing daily or weekly lessons.

    We naturally translate in our heads because it’s viewed as the easiest way to learn the definitions needed when learning a language. This way of learning can actually hinder your skills and fluency later on. If your brain has to make neural connections between the word you’re learning, what it means in your native tongue, and the physical object the connection will not be nearly as strong. When you bypass the original translation between Finnish and your native language then there is a more basic and strong connection between just the Finnish vocabulary word and the tangible object.

    start thinking in Finnish

    In this blog post, you will learn the 4 important techniques to easily and naturally begin to speculate about the daily occurrences in your life. The best part is all of these techniques are supported and can be achieved through FinnishPod101.com.

    Create Your Free Lifetime Account and Start Learning the whole Finnish Language from the Beginning!

    1. Surround yourself with Finnish

    Surround Yourself

    By surrounding yourself with Finnish constantly you will completely immerse yourself in the language. Without realizing it you’ll be learning pronunciation, sentence structures, grammar, and new vocabulary. You can play music in the background while you’re cooking or have a Finnish radio station on while you study. Immersion is a key factor with this learning process because it is one of the easiest things to do, but very effective. Even if you are not giving the program your full attention you will be learning.

    One great feature of FinnishPod101.com is the endless podcasts that are available to you. You can even download and listen to them on the go. These podcasts are interesting and are perfect for the intention of immersion, they are easy to listen to as background noise and are interesting enough to give your full attention. Many of them contain stories that you follow as you go through the lessons which push you to keep going.

    2. Learn through observation
    learn through observation

    Learning through observation is the most natural way to learn. Observation is how we all learned our native languages as infants and it’s a wonder why we stop learning this way. If you have patience and learn through observation then Finnish words will have their own meanings rather than meanings in reference to your native language. Ideally, you should skip the bilingual dictionary and just buy a dictionary in Finnish.

    FinnishPod101.com also offers the materials to learn this way. We have numerous video lessons which present situational usage of each word or phrase instead of just a direct translation. This holds true for many of our videos and how we teach Finnish.

    3. Speak out loud to yourself
    talk to yourself

    Speaking to yourself in Finnish not only gets you in the mindset of Finnish, but also makes you listen to how you speak. It forces you to correct any errors with pronunciation and makes it easy to spot grammar mistakes. When you speak out loud talk about what you did that day and what you plan to do the next day. Your goal is to be the most comfortable speaking out loud and to easily create sentences. Once you feel comfortable talking to yourself start consciously thinking in your head about your daily activities and what is going on around you throughout the day.

    With FinnishPod101.com you start speaking right away, not only this, but they have you repeat words and conversations after a native Finnish speaker. This makes your pronunciation very accurate! With this help, you are on the fast path to making clear and complex sentences and then actively thinking about your day.

    4. Practice daily

    If you don’t practice daily then your progress will be greatly slowed. Many people are tempted to take the 20-30 minutes they should be practicing a day and practice 120 in one day and skip the other days. This isn’t nearly as effective because everyday you practice you are reinforcing the skills and knowledge you have learned. If you practice all in one day you don’t retain the information because the brain can realistically only focus for 30 minutes at most. If you’re studying for 120 minutes on the same subject little of the information will be absorbed. Studying everyday allows you to review material that you went over previous days and absorb a small amount of information at a time.

    It’s tough to find motivation to study everyday, but FinnishPod101.com can help. It’s easy to stay motivated with FinnishPod101.com because we give you a set learning path, with this path we show how much progress you’ve made. This makes you stick to your goals and keep going!

    Conclusion

    Following the steps and having patience is the hardest part to achieving your goals, it’s not easy learning a new language. You are essentially teaching your brain to categorize the world in a completely new way. Stick with it and you can do it just remember the 4 tools I taught you today! With them, conversations, reading, and understanding will become much easier. The most important thing to remember is to use the tools that FinnishPod101.com provides and you will be on your way to being fluent!

    Learn Finnish With FinnishPod101 Today!