Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hi everyone, I’m Gina! Welcome back to FinnishPod101.com This is Absolute Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 22 - Who Took the Finnish Book from the Table?
Paula: Hei! Minä olen Paula. I’m Paula
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn to say that something comes off the top of something. In linguistic jargon, it’s the ablative case.
Paula: This conversation takes place at home. We’ll hear Helen and Jussi talking. They will be speaking in standard Finnish.
Gina: Let's listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: So, it’s Independence Day. When exactly is that?
Paula: It’s the 6th of December. Finland declared independence in 1917, so in a few years we’ll be in for a centenary.
Gina: Wow, I suppose there’ll be some big celebrations then. What do people do on Independence Day?
Paula: It’s customary to put two candles in windows in the evening. And there are a number of events on Independence Day, but the big thing is the President’s reception. It’s televised live for several hours.
Gina: What kind of a reception is it? Who’s invited?
Paula: The speculation starts in the yellow press, or tabloid press, weeks before the event. There are usually around 2,000 people invited. A good many are there every year, such as the Members of the Parliament, diplomats, and high-ranking people from various parts of society. In addition to them, the President invites artists, sportsmen and sportswomen and other people who have been prominent that year.
Gina: I suppose it’s quite a formal reception?
Paula: Oh, for sure. It’s full evening dress, and the first couple of hours go by as the President just shakes hands with everyone as they enter. I suppose the most interesting part is what the ladies are wearing.
Gina: Okay. Let’s have a look at the vocabulary.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Paula: The first word is ‘tarkoittaa’, “to mean”.
Gina: That should be a useful word for any language learner.
Paula: Definitely. With ‘tarkoittaa’, you can ask about the meaning of a word, as in ‘Mitä … tarkoittaa?’ “What does … mean?” You just insert any word you don’t know, for example ‘Mitä tuoli tarkoittaa?’
Gina: And then the other person will tell you what it is. But you can also use it as Helen did in the dialogue, to ask what another person means by what they said.
Paula: Oh, yes. Helen said ‘Tarkoitat kai tuolilta?’ “I suppose you mean from the chair?"
Gina: Ok. What’s the next word?
Paula: The next word is ‘kai’, which also appeared in the same sentence ‘Tarkoitat kai tuolilta?’ of Helen’s. It means “probably” or “I think”. You use it when you assume something is true, but you can’t be quite sure.
Gina: You can also use it to ask for confirmation from another person, right?
Paula: That’s right. You could say ‘Tulet kai huomenna?’ which means “You’re coming tomorrow, right?”
Gina: Okay. Now let’s move on to the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: In this lesson, you’re going to learn to say that something comes ‘off the top of something’. It’s the next locative case.
Paula: Right. It’s called the ablative, and it corresponds to the elative form ‘kaapista’, but here the thing doesn’t come out of something but from the top of it, such as ‘pöydältä’ meaning “from the table”.
Gina: And what’s the ending?
Paula: It’s ‘-lta/-ltä’, as in ‘pöydältä’ meaning “from the table”, ‘tuolilta’ meaning “from the chair”, or ‘lautaselta’ meaning “from the plate”.
Gina: Okay. So how do you say “Take the plate from the table”?
Paula: Ota lautanen pöydältä.
Gina: Listeners, repeat after Paula.
Paula: Ota lautanen pöydältä.
---
Gina: How would you say, “Take the toys from the floor”?
Paula: “Toy” is ‘lelu’ and “floor” is ‘lattia’, so it would be ‘Ota lelut lattialta’. One of the figurative uses of this case, is that when someone receives something, you use this case to indicate the giver.
Gina: You mean in something like “Maiju gets a Christmas card from Emmi”?
Paula: Exactly. That would be ‘Maiju saa Emmiltä joulukortin.’ ‘Emmiltä’ is in the ablative case, and Emmi is the one the card is from.
Gina: Okay. So how would you say “Helen gets a Christmas card from Maiju”?
Paula: ‘Helen saa Maijulta joulukortin.’ Here, ‘Maijulta’ is the ablative form of ‘Maiju’.
Gina: Okay. Listeners, it’s time to practice. How would you say “Jussi gets a Christmas card from Ville”?
Paula: All you need to do is insert the correct form of Ville in the sentence ‘Jussi saa ... joulukortin.’
---
Paula: Jussi saa Villeltä joulukortin.
Gina: How would you say “May I have that book from the couch?”
Paula: You probably remember this by now, but “May I have...” is ‘Saisinko...’ and “that book” is ‘tuo kirja’. “Couch” is ‘sohva’, and that’s the word you have to attach the ‘-lta’ ending to.
---
Paula: Saisinko tuon kirjan sohvalta?
Gina: How about “Why did the book fall off the table?”
Paula: Start with the question word ‘miksi’. The verb form of “fall” you need to use is ‘putosi’.
---
Paula: ‘Miksi kirja putosi pöydältä?’ How did you do? Is it a piece of cake or terribly hard? Please let us know in the comments!

Outro

Gina: Well, that’s going to do it for this lesson. As always, make sure you check the lesson notes, and we’ll see you next time!
Paula: Hei hei!

19 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Can you make a sentence using kai?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:37 PM
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Hello Kent,


Thank you for your Question! It is in genitive form as It expresses that whatever is being done is happening to the object. Hope this helps a bit.


Let us know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Kent
Tuesday at 06:50 PM
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Hei,

May I know why in the sentence "Saisinko tuon kirja sohvalta" from the lesson, it is "tuon" and not "tuo"? May I know what case is this?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 03:55 PM
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Hello Zuzana,


Thank you for your question.

In the Finnish language, nouns and suffixes play the huge part when we are forming sentences.

Here you have two totally different questions with different meanings. That's why the suffix is different also.

"Miksi kirja putosi pöydältä?" Why did a book fall from the table?

"Saisinko tuon kirjan?" May I get that book? This sentences object "kirja" is in genitive form and it is used with many postpositions (you want something, in this case). For more information, please contact your teacher if you are a premium plus subscriber as this is limited space for grammar explanations.


Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com


Zuzana
Wednesday at 08:21 PM
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Hello,


I was wondering why in the sentence "Miksi kirja putosi pöydältä?" the word "kirja" is in nominative and not in gentive like in "Saisinko tuon kirjan?". Is it because we use the genitive case only in affirmative sentences?


I have a little off-topic question but it has been on my mind for a long time. Is it okay if we use "sinä" in conversation with someone older or someone we don't know? Most of the examples are using it, but I don't want to offend anyone by not using "te".


Thank you!

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 04:24 PM
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Hi Luca,

Thank you for your questions.


¨Jussi tulee kuudelta.¨ So for time we need always to use lta? in which cases?

You use ending -lta, -ltä, to say When will you come. Milloin / Koska te tulette?

"Tulen viideltä", "tulen kahdeltatoista"


¨tuolillahan¨ mita ¨han¨ tarkoitaa?

It means in something similar in English. "Oh, yes, they are on the chair, indeed" Another example: Missä hansikkaani ovat? (where are my gloves?) Nyt muistankin, autossanihan ne ovat! (Now I remember, They are in my car, indeed)


¨Jussi saa Villeltä joulukortin¨Miksi ltä ja ei ¨lta¨?

There are three classes of vowels in Finnish. There can be either A, U, O or Ä, Y, Ö, but never both, inside a single word.

E and I are "neutral" vowels. You can find them in both words with A, U, O and Ä, Y, Ö.

When you find these both neutral vowels in one word, very often you can find -ltä ending of its ablative form.

For example: Kieli (tongue) Ablative form is "kieleltä."


¨Miksi kirja putosi pöydältä?¨Why not the genitive? I don´t see this is an imperative or passive sentence

" Why book fell from the table" The sentence is in ablative form when you want to say something come FROM somewhere or something."Book fell from the table". Sorry, Luca, I am not sure if I understand your question correctly.


¨En tiedä, miksi kirja putosi, koska olin yläkerrassa¨ Miksi siella on pilkku ¨tiedä¨ jalkeen?

Finnish comma rules are a bit different from English equivalents. We mostly separate many side sentences with commas in one main sentence. Sorry Luca, but this comment section is too small to explain Finnish comma rules and exceptions.



If you have any questions, please let us know.

Thank you.

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com


Luca P. Gentile
Tuesday at 04:48 AM
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Joka päivä, minä ottan kännykää pöydaltä

:-)



Voinko kysyn paaria kyssymys:


¨Jussi tulee kuudelta.¨

So for time we need always to use lta? in which cases?


¨tuolillahan¨

mita ¨han¨ tarkoitaa?


¨Jussi saa Villeltä joulukortin¨

Miksi ltä ja ei ¨lta¨?


¨Miksi kirja putosi pöydältä?¨

Why not the genitive? I don´t see this is an imperative or passive sentence


¨En tiedä, miksi kirja putosi, koska olin yläkerrassa¨

Miksi siella on pilkku ¨tiedä¨ jalkeen?



Kitoksia!

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 12:16 PM
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Hi Mary,


Thank you for your question.

It is not incorrect and very understandable. Anyway, it is a bit clearer to say it as "Emmi on kai kirjastossa."


If you have any questions, please let us know.

Thank you.

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Mary
Wednesday at 12:45 AM
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The lesson says

Emmi on kai kirjastossa. I think Emmi is in the library.


Would it be incorrect to say

Kai Emmi on kirjastossa.


Thanks.

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:40 PM
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Hei Bálint,


Kiitos kommentistasi!

Toivottavasti löydät mielenkiintoisia kirjoja sieltä. ?


Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Bálint
Tuesday at 02:52 AM
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Menen kai viikonlopulla kirjastoon.