Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FinnishPod101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 17 - Going on a Shopping Spree in Finland. Michael here.
Nico: Hei. I'm Nico.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use expressions and words related to discounts. The conversation takes place at a department store.
Nico: It's between Aino and Linnea.
Michael: The speakers are sisters-in-law, so they'll be using informal Finnish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Linnea: Hei täällä on alennusmyynti! Voisin katsoa tuliaisia Amerikkaan.
Aino: Etsitkö jotain tiettyä? Tässä olisi kotimaisia astioita alennuksessa.
Linnea: Nuo siniset lasit olisivat ihanat. Paljonko niistä saa alennusta?
Aino: Näistä saa 20 (kaksikymmentä) prosenttia alennusta. Normaalihinta on 10 (kymmenen) euroa kappale, joten sinun täytyy maksaa vielä kahdeksan euroa.
Linnea: Ne ovat vielä hiukan kalliita. Nämä vaaleanvihreät lasit ovat 40 % (neljänkymmenen prosentin) alennuksessa, joten ostan näitä itselleni ja tuliaisiksi. Näiden normaalihinta on yhdeksän euroa, joten näiden alennettu hinta on vain viisi euroa 40 (neljäkymmentä) senttiä kappaleelta!
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Linnea: Hei täällä on alennusmyynti! Voisin katsoa tuliaisia Amerikkaan.
Aino: Etsitkö jotain tiettyä? Tässä olisi kotimaisia astioita alennuksessa.
Linnea: Nuo siniset lasit olisivat ihanat. Paljonko niistä saa alennusta?
Aino: Näistä saa 20 (kaksikymmentä) prosenttia alennusta. Normaalihinta on 10 (kymmenen) euroa kappale, joten sinun täytyy maksaa vielä kahdeksan euroa.
Linnea: Ne ovat vielä hiukan kalliita. Nämä vaaleanvihreät lasit ovat 40 % (neljänkymmenen prosentin) alennuksessa, joten ostan näitä itselleni ja tuliaisiksi. Näiden normaalihinta on yhdeksän euroa, joten näiden alennettu hinta on vain viisi euroa 40 (neljäkymmentä) senttiä kappaleelta!
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Linnea: Hey there's a sale here! I could look for some souvenirs for America.
Aino: Are you looking for something in particular? Here’s some domestic tableware that’s on sale.
Linnea: Those blue glasses would be lovely. How much of a discount can I get on them?
Aino: You get a twenty percent discount on these. The normal price is ten euros for one, so you still have to pay eight euros.
Linnea: They’re still a little bit expensive. These light green glasses are forty percent off, so I’ll buy these for myself and as a souvenir. The normal price for these is nine euros, so the discounted price for these is only five euros forty cents a piece!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Nico, there are some Finnish brands that are very well-known all around the world. Can you tell us something about them?
Nico: Finnish designs, especially for interior items, such as iittala, Artek, Vallila or Fiskars, are quite popular.
Michael: Is it easy to buy them for a good price in Finland?
Nico: Unfortunately these items aren't on sale that often, and because they are good in quality and design they are a little expensive. A reasonable solution for the more frugal customer is to shop at the factory outlets that many design companies have.
Michael: Can you get a better deal there?
Nico: You can find reasonably priced special editions, samples and second-rate products, which doesn’t mean they’re bad in quality, it just means they may have some minor blemishes or scratches.
Michael: In addition, if you're fond of Finnish design, the staff at factory outlets usually know the brands and products very well and are happy to share their knowledge with you. Nico, before we move on, what's the Finnish word for “factory outlet”?
Nico: tehtaanmyymälä
Michael: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Nico: alennusmyynti [natural native speed]
Michael: sale
Nico: alennusmyynti[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: alennusmyynti [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: tuliainen [natural native speed]
Michael: souvenir
Nico: tuliainen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: tuliainen [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: kotimainen [natural native speed]
Michael: domestic
Nico: kotimainen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: kotimainen [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: alennus [natural native speed]
Michael: discount
Nico: alennus[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: alennus [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: prosentti [natural native speed]
Michael: percent
Nico: prosentti[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: prosentti [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: normaalihinta [natural native speed]
Michael: normal price
Nico: normaalihinta[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: normaalihinta [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: maksaa [natural native speed]
Michael: to cost
Nico: maksaa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: maksaa [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: kallis [natural native speed]
Michael: expensive
Nico: kallis[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: kallis [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: alennettu [natural native speed]
Michael: discounted
Nico: alennettu[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: alennettu [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: hinta [natural native speed]
Michael: price
Nico: hinta[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: hinta [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Nico: tuliainen
Michael: meaning "souvenir."
Nico: The etymology of the word links it to the verb tulla, "to come," and means an object that someone brings along with them when they come from another place.
Michael: This word is quite general, and can be used to refer to all kinds of objects. You can use it when, for example, you visit a neighbor and bring some freshly baked bread with you.
Nico: The bread is then tuliainen, something you bring with you and give to your neighbor as a present.
Michael: Can you give us an example sentence using this word?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Ystäväni tuovat minulle pieniä nukkeja tuliaisiksi, koska kerään niitä.
Michael: ..which means "My friends bring me small dolls as souvenirs, as I collect them." Is there any other word we can use?
Nico: Another word for "souvenir" is matkamuisto.
Michael: This word refers to objects that are brought as souvenirs from particular places, such as dolls, mascots, articles of clothing, and so on. It describes keepsakes you hold on to to remember the place you visited, as opposed to edible items. Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you'll learn how to discuss and calculate discounts at a sale.
Nico: First, let’s remember that Finland uses the same currency as most countries in the European Union, the Euro. Please be careful with the pronunciation though, because it's a bit different from English.
Michael: Let’s hear some examples to make it clear.
Nico: [clearly pronounced] Yhdeksän euroa ja viisikymmentä senttiä,
Michael: which means "Nine euros and fifty cents."
Nico: Here's another, Neljäkymmentä euroa ja kaksikymmentäviisi senttiä.
Michael: "Forty euros and twenty-five cents." The currencies--the euro and cent--are expressed in the partitive case. Nico, could you repeat the corresponding words?
Nico: Sure! [slowly] euroa, senttiä. The cents used in Finland are 5, 10, 20 and 50 cent coins. In Finnish, it's sentti.
Michael: Does this mean that we'll never hear “19.99” in a shop?
Nico: Not exactly. Prices can be stated with smaller cents, such as “19.99,” but if you are paying with cash it will be rounded to the nearest 5 cents.
Michael: The 1 and 2 cent coins aren't generally used in Finland, but you can pay with them if you want.
Nico: Shops are allowed to refuse payment with 1 and 2 cent coins, but if they turn them down, this policy must already be clearly stated on the premises.
Michael: So this means that you generally won't receive 1 or 2 cents as change.
Nico: Yes, that’s right.
Michael: Ok, now, since everyone appreciates a good bargain, let’s take a look at some vocabulary related to sales.
Nico: In Finnish, “sale” is alennusmyynti. In this word, alennus is “discount” and myynti is “sales.”
Michael: So how do we say that something is “on sale?”
Nico: You can say alennuksessa.
Michael: What’s an example?
Nico: Tämä on alennuksessa
Michael: “This is on sale.” You can also use this to ask whether something is on sale, right?
Nico: Right! For example, you can ask the question Onko tämä alennuksessa?
Michael: meaning “Is this on sale?”
Nico: You may have noticed that the word alennuksessa, meaning “on sale” does not change. You only need to change the verb olla, “to be,” and the personal pronoun accordingly.
Michael: Now, if you want to know how much of a discount you can get on something, what can you ask?
Nico: Paljonko tästä saa alennusta?
Michael: “How much of a discount can I get on this?”
Nico: In the answer, you may hear this same expression, alennusta, which can simply express how much the discount is. For example, Näistä saa 20% (kaksikymmentä prosenttia) alennusta.
Michael: “There is a 20% discount on these.”
Nico: Another useful expression is Alennettu,
Michael: meaning “reduced.”
Nico: For example, Tämän alennettu hinta on vain viisi euroa.
Michael: “The reduced price of this is only five euros.”
Nico: The opposite of “reduced price” is “normal price,” normaalihinta. For example Normaalihinta on kymmenen euroa kappale.
Michael: “The normal price is ten euros a piece.” To wrap up this lesson, let’s give some other examples.
Nico: Sure. Kyltissä lukee 'kaksi yhden hinnalla'.
Michael: "The sign says 'two for the price of one'."
Nico: Odotan, kunnes ne tulevat alennukseen.
Michael: "I am going to wait until they are on sale."
Nico: Tämän normaalihinta olisi todella kallis. Mikä löytö!
Michael: "The normal price for this would be very expensive. What a bargain!"

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nico: Hei hei.

5 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Is there any "Made in Finland" item you would like to receive as a present?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:57 PM
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Hi Hung Hoang,


Thank you for your question.


Word "kappaleelta" is used to describe English equivalent "for one piece." The basic form of this word is "kappale" (English: one piece.)

I hope this helps a bit. 😄

If you have any questions, please let us know.

Thank you.

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Hung Hoang
Thursday at 06:46 PM
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Hi,


Could you explain why we use "kappaleelta" on this sentence

" Näiden normaalihinta on yhdeksän euroa, joten näiden alennettu hinta on vain viisi euroa 40 (neljäkymmentä) senttiä kappaleelta!"


Instead of "kappale" like this sentence "Normaalihinta on 10 (kymmenen) euroa kappale"


Thanks,

Hung

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:51 AM
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Hi Corinne,


Thank you for your question.


Candle holder means "kynttilänjalka" in Finnish.

1. Yes, they are interchangeable and you can use both in any situations.

2. It has pretty similar meaning as "vasta" but it matches more nicely to this situation when you are doing something (waiting, in this case ?) untill these will be discounted.

3. Words "joka" and "jota" means person and words "mikä" and "mitä" means things, in general. Word "että" means "that" but word "that" can mean also "jotta" and "joka" but in the Finnish language, you can follow the these given guidelines.


If you have any questions, please let us know.

Thank you.

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Sunday at 12:42 PM
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Juuri nyt, haluaisin tosi paljon jotain Raskasta Joulua- levyjä. :P Mutta luulen, että mun pitää odottaa, voin vasta käydä Suomeen. Haluasin myös iittala candle holders (Not sure what the word for "Candle holder" is in Finnish. XP)


And again, more questions: XD

1) "Kuinka paljon" and "Paljonko" both mean "How much". Are they interchangeable, or are there situations where one is used over the other?

2) This dialogue also has the word "kunnes", which I don't think I've ever seen before. Why is it used instead of "vasta"?

3) I've noticed in some Finnish things I read that "Joka", "jota", etc, are sometimes used in places where we would use "that" or "which" in English. I admit that this is a bit confusing. :P Why do you use those words and not "että", "mikä", or "mitä"?