Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FinnishPod101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 2 - Making Requests at a Finnish Hotel Michael Here.
Nico: Hei. I'm Nico.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn some basic expressions for checking in to a hotel using the conditional form. The conversation takes place at a hotel in Helsinki.
Nico: It's between Aino and a hotel receptionist.
Michael: The speakers are in a customer service situation, so they’ll be using formal Finnish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Aino: Päivää! Haluaisimme kirjautua sisään, meillä pitäisi olla varaus.
Hotel Receptionist: Päivää, ja tervetuloa! Millä nimellä varaus on tehty?
Aino: Se on nimellä Virtanen. Aino ja Heikki Virtanen.
Hotel Receptionist: Kyllä vain, löysin varauksenne. Kahden hengen huone kahdeksi yöksi.
Aino: Olisiko mahdollista saada huone merinäköalalla?
Hotel Receptionist: Hetki, tarkistan.. ..Kyllä, onnistuu! Uloskirjautuminen on ylihuomenna kello 12(kahteentoista) mennessä. Toivotan teille viihtyisää oleskelua!
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Aino: Päivää! Haluaisimme kirjautua sisään, meillä pitäisi olla varaus.
Hotel Receptionist:Päivää, ja tervetuloa! Millä nimellä varaus on tehty?
Aino: Se on nimellä Virtanen. Aino ja Heikki Virtanen.
Hotel Receptionist:Kyllä vain, löysin varauksenne. Kahden hengen huone kahdeksi yöksi.
Aino: Olisiko mahdollista saada huone merinäköalalla?
Hotel Receptionist: Hetki, tarkistan.. ..Kyllä, onnistuu! Uloskirjautuminen on ylihuomenna kello 12(kahteentoista) mennessä. Toivotan teille viihtyisää oleskelua!
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Aino: Good afternoon! We would like to check in. We should have a reservation.
Hotel Receptionist: Good afternoon, and welcome! What name is your reservation under?
Aino: It’s under the name Virtanen. Aino and Heikki Virtanen.
Hotel Receptionist: Oh yes, I found your reservation. A room for two people, for two nights.
Aino: Would it be possible to get a room with an ocean view?
Hotel Receptionist: Just a moment please, I’ll check. Yes, it can be done! Check out will be the day after tomorrow by twelve o'clock. Have a pleasant stay!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: I wonder if the hotel in the dialogue was one of those ones made of ice that I saw on TV once?
Nico: It could be, because there is an ice hotel in Finland! Actually there are many kinds of speciality hotels that you might like to try. If you travel to Finland in the winter, the most exotic places you could stay in are perhaps the snow hotel in Kemi, or the one you probably saw, the igloo-shaped cottages with glass roofs in Levi in Lapland.
Michael: But are they really made of ice?
Nico: Yes, the snow hotel is actually a whole castle built out of snow and ice, and it gets rebuilt every year.
Michael: It sounds great! What’s the Finnish word for "snow castle"?
Nico: lumilinna
Michael: Do you always have to go way out into the countryside if you want to enjoy one of these theme hotels?
Nico: Not necessarily. In Helsinki you might enjoy hotelli Klaus K, or hotel Klaus K, which has themed rooms displaying different stories and mythic characters from the Finnish national epic, the Kalevala.
Michael: Listeners, if you’re a lover of fantasy fiction, you might know that the Kalevala inspired J.R.R. Tolkien when he wrote his legendary work, 'Lord of the Rings.’
Nico: So if you ever go to Finland, you should definitely stay there!
Michael: Yea, that sounds like a really interesting experience!
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Okay! Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Nico: kirjautua [natural native speed]
Michael: to check in
Nico: kirjautua[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: kirjautua [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: varaus [natural native speed]
Michael: reservation
Nico: varaus [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: varaus [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: nimellä [natural native speed]
Michael: under the name
Nico: nimellä [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: nimellä [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: huone [natural native speed]
Michael: room
Nico: huone [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: huone [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: merinäköala [natural native speed]
Michael: ocean view/ sea view
Nico: merinäköala [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: merinäköala [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: kahden hengen huone [natural native speed]
Michael: a room for two people
Nico: kahden hengen huone [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: kahden hengen huone [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: uloskirjautuminen [natural native speed]
Michael: check-out
Nico: uloskirjautuminen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: uloskirjautuminen [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: ylihuomenna [natural native speed]
Michael: the day after tomorrow
Nico: ylihuomenna [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: ylihuomenna [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Nico: kahden hengen huone
Michael: And it means "a room for two."
Nico: The expression is made up of three words, kaksi meaning "two," henki or henkilö meaning "person," and huone, "room."
Michael: In this expression you first state the number of people, then the word for “person” in the genitive case, and finally the word for “room.” So Nico, what is “a room for four people?”
Nico: neljän hengen huone
Michael: Do you use this phrase only when you’re at a hotel?
Nico: Not just hotels, you can use it when you’re booking or requesting a room on a cruise too, or even when you’re booking a meeting room.
Michael: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Hotellissa ei ole yhtään kahden hengen huonetta vapaana.
Michael: ..which means "There aren't any rooms for two available at the hotel." Okay, what's the next word?
Nico: merinäköala,
Michael: literally this means "sea view" or “ocean view.”
Nico: The expression merinäköala is made out of two words- meri meaning "sea," and näköala meaning "view." You can use this word whenever you want to say “ocean view.”
Michael: Can you use a similar expression if you want to ask for a different view?
Nico: You can also replace the word “sea,” meri, with another suitable word, such as vuoristo,
Michael: meaning "the mountains."
Nico: In that case, you have vuoristonäköala,
Michael: which would be “mountain view.” Can you give us an example using “ocean view”?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Täältä on upea merinäköala.
Michael: .. which means "The ocean view from here is astonishing." Okay, what's the last word?
Nico: uloskirjautuminen
Michael: meaning "check-out."
Nico: This word is made up of two words, ulos, "out," and kirjautuminen, "logging in" or "checking in."
Michael: I suppose you can use this word when you’re checking out of a hotel, or from any other place or service, or even when you’re logging off of e-mail.
Nico: That’s right, it works for all those cases.
Michael: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Uloskirjautuminen on mielestäni aivan liian aikaisin.
Michael: .. which means "The check-out is way too early in my opinion." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you’ll learn how to check in to a hotel. You’ll become familiar with basic expressions for checking into a hotel and using the conditional form. In the conversation, Aino and Heikki were checking in to a hotel.
Nico: In Finland, when you get to a hotel and you want to check in, there are two possible phrases you can use. If you've already booked a room and you want to tell the desk staff that you have a reservation, you can say Minulla on varaus.
Michael: “I have a reservation.”
Nico: In the dialogue, Aino was with Heikki so she used the plural form me, meaning “we.” She also used the polite form of “should have,” pitäisi olla. Meillä pitäisi olla varaus
Michael: which means “We should have a reservation.” What if you haven’t booked yet, how can you say "I would like a room?”.
Nico: That’s Haluaisin yhden huoneen. The first word, haluaisin, means "I would like." Then we have yhden,
Michael: meaning "one" in the accusative form,
Nico: and finally huoneen,
Michael: which means "room" in the accusative form.
Nico: Yhden huoneen. Altogether, the phrase is Haluaisin yhden huoneen,
Michael: literally meaning "I would like one room.” After this, you will most likely be asked "May I have your name, please?"
Nico: And in Finnish, that is Saisinko nimenne, kiitos. In the dialogue, the receptionist asks Aino Millä nimellä varaus on tehty?
Michael: Which means “What name is your reservation under?”
Nico: You can also give your name to the receptionist to confirm your reservation. You can do this by saying minulla on varaus, “I have a reservation,” then nimellä which means "under the name," and finally your name. Altogether, we have Minulla on varaus nimellä plus your name.
Michael: Which is "I have a reservation under the name of ..." and here you add your name.
Nico: Sometimes you might be asked to spell your name, and in Finnish, this is Voisitteko tavata sen, kiitos? - or “Could you spell it, please?” The first word, voisitteko, means "Could you?" in formal Finnish. The next word, tavata, means "to spell." At the end is sen, which is se, or "it," in the accusative form. To make the phrase polite, you usually add kiitos,
Michael: which means “please” or “thank you.” Aino also asked if she could get a room with an ocean view, right?
Nico: That’s right. She used the conditional and asked the question Olisiko mahdollista saada huone merinäköalalla?,
Michael: “Would it be possible to get a room with an ocean view?”. Nico, can you use a similar sentence to make other requests?
Nico: Yes, you can say Olisiko mahdollista meaning “Would it be possible to…” and after this you can add the verb saada, meaning “to get,” and the name of the object you’d like to get.
Michael: Can you give us an example?
Nico: For example, Olisiko mahdollista saada lisävuode?
Michael: “Would it be possible to get an extra bed?”
Nico: "Huomenta, olisiko mahdollista kirjautua sisään jo tähän aikaan?"
Michael: "Good morning, is it possible to check in already?"
Nico: Or you can also use it in a different way, "Haluaisin kirjautua ulos vasta iltapäivällä. Onko se mahdollista?"
Michael: "I wouldn't want to check-out until the afternoon. Is that possible?"
Nico: Note that here, Onko se mahdollista? means “Is that possible?”

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nico: Hei hei.

14 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Have you ever been in a "snow castle"?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:44 PM
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Hi Elena,

Thank you for your question.


"Olisiko mahdollista saada huone merinäköalalla?", why "huone" is in the nominative case and not genitive?

This sentence is in polite perfect conditional form. Words "olisiko mahdollista" (would it be possible) rules the rest of sentence.

Actually, more "formal" would be to say it as "Olisiko mahdollista saada huonetta merinäköalalla?" but as modern Finnish people love to shorten certain words, this sentence has often been said the earlier way.

Another example: Jos ilma olisi ollut kaunis, perhe olisi lähtenyt maalle. (If the weather had been fine, the family would have gone to the country.)


If you want to say "huone" in the genitive form, the sentence would be then, "voinko saada huoneen merinäköalalla?"

I hope this helps a bit.


If you have any questions, please let us know.

Thank you.

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Elena
Wednesday at 08:17 AM
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Hei Aarni,


Sorry, but I think it doesn't answer Greg's question (and I have the same question after this lesson): in the sentence "Olisiko mahdollista saada huone merinäköalalla?", why "huone" is in the nominative case and not genitive?


P.S.

Pidän tästä verkkosivustosta todella paljon, mutta minun mielestäni on erittäin ärsyttävä, että kommenteissä ei näy päiväystä.

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 11:09 AM
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Hi Greg,


Thank you for your question.


"Olisiko mahdollista saada" This is a conditional tense and in English, it means "Would it be possible to get" (as you may very well know).


Let us know if you have any question.Thank you.

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Greg
Saturday at 09:49 AM
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Hei!

I was wondering if I can ask about the sentence


Olisiko mahdollista saada huone merinäköalalla?


I have a good understanding of when the accusative is like the genitive and when it is like partitive but I am still unsure when the object looks like a nominative.

A site I like gives these reasons for the noun to be like nominative

1. When the verb is in the passive form. (ostetaan, syödään, luetaan, kirjoitetaan)

2. When the clause is nesessiivi. (minun täytyy, on pakko, sinun pitää)

3. When it is a command. (Ota! Syö! Avaa! Lukekaa!)


But here, is huone not the object of saada? Yet it still resembles the nominative. Why?

Kiitos avusta!

Greg

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 01:14 AM
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Hi Karin,


Great to know that you're enjoying our website!


Please stay tuned! Every week we'll have new lessons for you! ;)


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team FinnishPod101.com

Karin
Friday at 12:51 AM
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This is a very practical course. Nice that words are broken up, so you can understand better how the words are pronounced.

Corinna
Thursday at 03:54 PM
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Hei Päivi!


Ah, okay. So for "happier" things it's "Haluaisin tosi paljon", etc. Got it.


Haha, ole hyvä :grin: I feel bad for anyone trying to learn English, especially written English. It must be really hard!

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:52 AM
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Moi Corinna!


Well, you *can* use the expression 'rakastaisin', but I guess it's quite rare. Maybe in more sad contexts, like "rakastaisin sinua enemmän, jos olisit kiltimpi" ("I would love you more, if you were more nice."), etc.


I had to try that English Game too! Wow! Quite fun and interesting! Thank you for sharing that :smile:


Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Thursday at 06:34 AM
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Moi taas, Päivi :smile:


Ah, okay. I was wondering about that :laughing: Is "rakastaisin" ever really used, then?


Haha, English is a strange language, too :laughing: There is a meme online called "English Game" I saw online where you have to put the word "Only" in the sentence "She told him that she loved him". And the joke is that it can go in about five or six different places in the sentence and mean different things every time :open_mouth:

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:10 AM
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Moi Corinna!


"Rakastaisin" is certainly a Finnish word for "I would love", but we don't really use it that way.

Quite often the expression "I would love to.." is expressed as "haluaisin..." ('I would like to...') or "pitäisin..." ('I would like to...'). People can emphasize the sentence by adding words like "todella paljon", "tosi paljon" ('very much') or "niin paljon" ('so much') to it. For example:

"Haluaisin käydä todella paljon lumilinnassa!" - ' I would like to visit a snow castle so much!"

...It sounds a bit odd, but that's how it is! :open_mouth:


Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com