Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FinnishPod101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 21 - Planning Your Escape from the Finnish City. Michael here.
Nico: Hei. I'm Nico.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the essive case and the verb meaning “intend to” to communicate future plans. The conversation takes place in a private home.
Nico: It's between Aino and Heikki.
Michael: The speakers are married, so they’ll be using informal Finnish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Aino: Heikki, mitä aiot tehdä viikonloppuna?
Heikki: En mitään erityistä. Ensi viikolla menen työmatkalle, joten haluaisin vain rentoutua.
Aino: Mentäisiinkö huomisiltana kävelyretkelle rannalle, illaksi on luvattu aurinkoista säätä?
Heikki: Se on ihan hyvä idea. Ja ylihuomenna voimme katsoa elokuvan.
Aino: Katsotaan vain. Tänään aion lämmittää saunan.
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Aino: Heikki, mitä aiot tehdä viikonloppuna?
Heikki: En mitään erityistä. Ensi viikolla menen työmatkalle, joten haluaisin vain rentoutua.
Aino: Mentäisiinkö huomisiltana kävelyretkelle rannalle, illaksi on luvattu aurinkoista säätä?
Heikki: Se on ihan hyvä idea. Ja ylihuomenna voimme katsoa elokuvan.
Aino: Katsotaan vain. Tänään aion lämmittää saunan.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Aino: Heikki, what are you going to do on the weekend?
Heikki: Nothing special. Next week I’m going on a work trip, so I’d like to just relax.
Aino: Shall we go for a walk on the beach tomorrow evening, since they’ve promised sunny weather?
Heikki: That’s quite a good idea. And the day after tomorrow we can watch a movie.
Aino: Sure, let's do it. Today I’m going to heat up the sauna.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Nico, what leisure time activities do Finns like most?
Nico: Finns like to get some fresh air during their leisure time, and jogging, walking, and nordic walking are very common and popular ways to exercise.
Michael: What about people living in cities?
Nico: People who live in town houses will usually do some gardening, rake leaves, or shovel snow in the winter.
Michael: After all that effort, I suppose that the best way to relax is to heat up the famous Finnish sauna!
Nico: That’s right! You should know that practically everyone who lives in a townhouse or terraced house has their own sauna, and there is almost always at least a communal sauna in apartment buildings.
Michael: Wow! That must make winter enjoyable! Is there any word we should learn for this topic?
Nico: Here’s a good one - kiuas.
Michael: Which means "sauna heater." Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Nico: aikoa [natural native speed]
Michael: to intend, to be going to do
Nico: aikoa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: aikoa [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: viikonloppu [natural native speed]
Michael: weekend
Nico: viikonloppu[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: viikonloppu [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: erityinen [natural native speed]
Michael: special
Nico: erityinen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: erityinen [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: ensi [natural native speed]
Michael: next
Nico: ensi[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: ensi [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: viikolla [natural native speed]
Michael: (during the) week
Nico: viikolla[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: viikolla [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: rentoutua [natural native speed]
Michael: to relax
Nico: rentoutua[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: rentoutua [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: huomisiltana [natural native speed]
Michael: tomorrow evening
Nico: huomisiltana[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: huomisiltana [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: ylihuomenna [natural native speed]
Michael: the day after tomorrow
Nico: ylihuomenna[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: ylihuomenna [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Nico: viikonloppu,
Michael: meaning "weekend."
Nico: Just like the English, the Finnish word is made of two terms viikko meaning "week," and loppu which means "end."
Michael: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Onneksi on jo viikonloppu!
Michael: ..which means "Thankfully it's already the weekend!" Okay, what's the next word?
Nico: työmatka
Michael: meaning "work trip, business trip."
Nico: työmatka is also comprised of two words, työ meaning "work" and matka, which is “trip" or "travel."
Michael: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Minulla on ensi viikolla työmatka Lontooseen.
Michael: .. which means "I have a business trip to London next week."
Michael: What about if you’re traveling for pleasure, is there a similar word?
Nico: Yes. When you’re travelling for leisure, and particularly when you’re on a package holiday, you can say lomamatka, loma being "holiday" and matka being "trip" or "travel."
Michael: Okay, what's the next word?
Nico: ylihuomenna
Michael: meaning "the day after tomorrow."
Nico: ylihuomenna is made up of two parts - yli meaning "over" and huomenna meaning "tomorrow."
Michael: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Ylihuomenna on lauantai.
Michael: .. which means "The day after tomorrow is Saturday." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you’ll learn how to discuss future plans.
Nico: You’ll learn how to use the essive case and the verb aikoa, meaning “to intend to,” to communicate future plans.
Michael: Let’s start with a sentence from the dialogue,
Nico: mitä aiot tehdä viikonloppuna?
Michael: Meaning “what are you going to do on the weekend?" This is a useful phrase for making conversation. Could you break it down?
Nico: Sure, Mitä is the question word and means "what." aiot is the conjugated form of aikoa, meaning "you are going to." tehdä means "to do," and viikonloppuna is "on the weekend."
Michael: Depending on the situation you may need a different time expression, for example, “tomorrow” instead of “on the weekend.” What would “tomorrow” be in Finnish?
Nico: huomenna.
Michael: And what if you want to ask about a weekday?
Nico: This is where you need the essive case.
Michael: Let’s first say that the essive is a grammatical case that is expressing something as “being something” as their state of being. The essive case is expressing an abstract or conceptual state of being. Nico, could you give an example?
Nico: For example, “as a mother,” äitinä. You can form the essive case by adding a -na or -nä ending to the stem of the word.
Michael: Let’s try with the weekdays.
Nico: For example, “Monday” is maanantai , and “on Monday” is [slowly] maanantaina
Michael: What’s “on Saturday”?
Nico: lauantaina.
Michael: So all we have to do is change the ending of the word?
Nico: Yes, but please know that not all words take the ending -na. There are a few irregularities. For example, the expression ensi viikko, meaning "next week," needs the ending -lla. Also, look at words like huomenna,
Michael: meaning “tomorrow”
Nico: and ylihuomenna
Michael: “the day after tomorrow.”
Nico: You’ll notice that they already have the -na ending and don’t need to be changed.
Michael: Ok. Now let’s see how to answer and talk about your plans.
Nico: To answer the question mitä aiot tehdä viikonloppuna?, you could say something like Minä aion mennä elokuviin.
Michael: "I'm going to go to the movies."
Nico: Minä aion means "I'm going to," so mennä elokuviin means "to go to the movies." Elokuva is the basic form of "a movie," and elokuviin is the form you would use to indicate "to the movies." The verb mennä, “to go,” is in the infinitive form here.
Michael: You can replace it with other verbs in the infinitive form as well. So Nico, can you give us an example?
Nico: Yes, for example Minä aion laulaa.
Michael: “I am going to sing.” Let’s see the full conjugation for the Finnish verb “to intend to.”
Nico: Sure thing! First we have Minä aion..
Michael: Which means “I am going to …”
Nico: Sinä aiot..
Michael: “You are going to …”
Nico: Hän aikoo..
Michael: “He or She is going to …”
Nico: Me aiomme..
Michael: “We are going to …”
Nico: Te aiotte..
Michael: “You are going to …”
Nico: He aikovat..
Michael: “They are going to …” Ok, now let’s give some practical examples.
Nico: For example, Tänään aion mennä uimaan.
Michael: “I am going to go swimming today.”
Nico: Me aiomme tanssia ensi viikolla.
Michael: “We are going to dance next week.”
Nico: Aion mennä kirjastoon huomenna.
Michael: "I am going to go to the library tomorrow."

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nico: Hei hei.

5 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi! What are you going to do in the weekend?
Mitä aiot tehdä viikonloppuna?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:32 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Corinna,

Thank you for your question.


1. The word "mentäisiinkö" is a polite, conditional form of the word "mennäänkö" The basic word is "mennä" (to go) and it is in question form.

In English, the word "mentäisiinkö" means, "could we go... "


2. "Ensi viikolla menen työmatkalle, joten haluaisin vain rentoutua." In this case, the word "vaan" means "only" in English. (Nex t week I am going to work trip, so, I would like to relax only)

In Finnish, you could say also: "Ensi viikolla menen työmatkalle, joten haluaisin vaan rentoutua." It means the same, basically.


Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Saturday at 12:47 PM
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More questions. :P


1) I don't quite understand where the "t" it "Mentäisiinkö" comes from.

2) I see / hear "Vain" and "Vaan" used a lot in casual Finnish conversations, like at the end of the dialogue in this lesson. How and when is it used in conversations?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:53 PM
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Hei Vadim!


When you are in the action of doing something, like watching the movie, you say "katson elokuvaa", i.e. use the partitive form.

When you are expressing that you are going to do something or you have done something, like here, you will watch the _whole_ movie, you use the genitive form. For example; "Luen kirjaa" ("I am reading a book"), "Luin kirjan" ("I read the book").


Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Vadim
Friday at 07:39 AM
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Hei! Voitteko selittää, miksi Heikki sanoi elokuvan, luulin että katsoa on partitiivi verbi? Kiitos!

I hope I wrote it correctly, but I'll ask in English as well:smile:

Hi! Could you explain why genetive form is used with the word "elokuva", isn't "katsoa" a partitive verb? Thank you!