Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FinnishPod101.com This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 22 - A Confusing Situation in Finland. Michael here.
Nico: Hei. I'm Nico.
Michael: In this lesson you’ll learn how to express confusion in negative present tense and negative past tense. The conversation takes place in a private home.
Nico: It's between Aino and Heikki.
Michael: The speakers are married, so they’ll be using informal Finnish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Aino: Mihin aikaan menisimme kävelylle?
Heikki: Mitä...? Nyt en ymmärrä. Emmekö sopineet, että menemme kävelylle vasta huomenna?
Aino: Ai, niinkö se olikin.. Mutta tänäänkin on hyvä sää.
Heikki: Toki. Mutta ajattelin mennä poikien kanssa katsomaan peliä.
Aino: Mutta.. eikö sinun pitänyt vain rentoutua kotona tänä viikonloppuna? Luulin että menet työmatkalle ensi viikolla.
Heikki: Erehdyin viikosta. Menen työmatkalle vasta kahden viikon kuluttua.
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Aino: Mihin aikaan menisimme kävelylle?
Heikki: Mitä...? Nyt en ymmärrä. Emmekö sopineet, että menemme kävelylle vasta huomenna?
Aino: Ai, niinkö se olikin.. Mutta tänäänkin on hyvä sää.
Heikki: Toki. Mutta ajattelin mennä poikien kanssa katsomaan peliä.
Aino: Mutta.. eikö sinun pitänyt vain rentoutua kotona tänä viikonloppuna? Luulin että menet työmatkalle ensi viikolla.
Heikki: Erehdyin viikosta. Menen työmatkalle vasta kahden viikon kuluttua.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Aino: What time shall we go for a walk?
Heikki: What...? Now I don't understand. Didn't we agree not to go for a walk until tomorrow?
Aino: Oh, was that it.. But the weather is nice today too.
Heikki: Sure. But I was thinking of going to see the game with the boys.
Aino: But... weren't you supposed to just relax at home this weekend? I thought you were going on a work trip next week.
Heikki: I was mistaken about the week. I’m not going on the work trip until two weeks from now.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Nico, do Finnish people like spectator sports?
Nico: Spectator sports are very popular in Finland. Most often they are watched on tv, and the most popular sports are the formula races, as well as various winter sports.
Michael: What’s the most popular winter sport?
Nico: Ice hockey is extremely popular in Finland, and children even learn how to play it in school. Supporting your local hockey team at the ice rink is a must for big fans of the sport, but it’s also a fun experience for the occasional spectator!
Michael: What’s the Finnish word for “hockey?”
Nico: We often use the colloquial word lätkä.
Michael: Okay, good to know! Now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Nico: ymmärtää [natural native speed]
Michael: to understand
Nico: ymmärtää[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: ymmärtää [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: aika [natural native speed]
Michael: hour, time
Nico: aika[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: aika [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: kävely [natural native speed]
Michael: walk
Nico: kävely[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: kävely [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: sopia [natural native speed]
Michael: to suit, to fit
Nico: sopia[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: sopia [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: vasta [natural native speed]
Michael: not until
Nico: vasta[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: vasta [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: ajatella [natural native speed]
Michael: to think
Nico: ajatella[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: ajatella [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: pitää [natural native speed]
Michael: to like
Nico: pitää[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: pitää [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: luulla [natural native speed]
Michael: to believe, to think
Nico: luulla[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: luulla [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: erehtyä [natural native speed]
Michael: to make a mistake
Nico: erehtyä[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: erehtyä [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of one of the phrases from this lesson.
Nico: The key-phrase we’ll look at is mennä kävelylle
Michael: meaning "to go for a walk."
Nico: Mennä is the verb for “to go” and kävelylle means “for a walk.”
Michael: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Koiran kanssa täytyy käydä kävelyllä kolme kertaa päivässä.
Michael: ..which means "With a dog you must go for a walk three times a day."
Nico: You can also change the word kävely to something else, for example, menen juoksulenkille,
Michael:...which means "I am going for a run."
Nico: You may also hear Kävelylenkki.
Michael: Which literally means “a round of walk,” and refers to a long walk done for exercise. Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you will learn how to express confusion and ask for clarification.
Nico: In Finnish, affirmative and negative questions are formed by adding a -ko or -kö - which is spelled “k”, “o” with an umlaut - ending to the verb. Basically you take a verb, conjugate it to the correct person, and then add the ending -ko or -kö.
Michael: How do you know which is the correct ending?
Nico: Usually -ko is used when the basic form of the verb ends with an a, and -kö is used when the basic form of the verb ends with an ä.
Michael: Listeners, remember that these endings are already expressing a question, so question words are not needed in these sentences.
Nico: Exactly. For example, let’s consider the verb opiskella, which ends with -a
Michael: and means “to study.”
Nico: “I study” is minä opiskelen and the corresponding question is opiskelenko minä?
Michael: meaning “do I study?” How about another example?
Nico: Sure! Let’s take a look at Mennä, which ends with an ä,
Michael: and means “to go.”
Nico: The question in the first person will be menenkö minä?
Michael: Meaning “Do I go?” In the dialogue we also saw some negative questions.
Nico: Yes, for example “Eikö sinun pitänyt vain rentoutua?”
Michael: meaning “Weren’t you supposed to just relax?”
Nico: Negative questions are formed by adding the -ko and -kö endings to the negation particles.
Michael: What are these negations?
Nico: I will list them and add -kö
Michael: I will give the English translation after.
Nico:enkö
Michael: “didn’t/aren’t/wasn’t I”
Nico: etkö
Michael: “didn’t/aren’t/weren’t you”
Nico: eikö
Michael: “didn’t/isn’t/wasn’t he or she”
Nico: emmekö
Michael: “didn’t/aren’t/weren’t we”
Nico: ettekö
Michael: “didn’t/aren’t/weren’t you.” This is the plural “you.”
Nico: eivätkö
Michael: “didn’t/aren’t/weren’t they”
Nico: In the dialogue, we had Emmekö sopineet, että menemme kävelylle vasta huomenna?
Michael: “Didn't we agree not to go for a walk until tomorrow?” You can tell from the form used that Heikki was under the impression that he and Aino had agreed to go for a walk tomorrow, not today. He’s using the negative question to get confirmation from Aino and check if what he thinks is correct.

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nico: Hei hei.

9 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Listeners! Have you ever tried to play ice hockey?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:01 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Shanti,


Thank you for your question.

In this sentence; "Eikö sinun pitänyt vain rentoutua?" The Active Past Participle form is used. Why it is used here? Because the other person surely told earlier to the other one that he is going to rest but that did not happen. That's why the question is in the Active Past Participle form. To learn more about this form, please contact your teacher.


Let us know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Shanti
Wednesday at 10:43 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi, in the conversation they are talking about why Heikki is not resting at home this week (present). But why is it that 'pitänyt' is used here instead of 'pidä' in the sentence "Eikö sinun pitänyt vain rentoutua?"?

Kiitos!

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 07:20 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello M,


Thank you for your question! "Etkö nuku-kaan vielä?" This suffix has been used to emphasize, why one is not sleeping yet against expectations. Hope this helps. 😄


Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

M
Friday at 03:31 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

In the lesson notes there is an example sentence that says "Etkö nuku (kaan) vielä?". What's the difference between "Etkö nuku vielä?" and "Etkö nukukaan vielä?"? Is it the singular you vs the plural you, or is it something else?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 12:17 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Corinna,


Thank you for your question.


Mekin täällä Suomessa pelaamme lätkää (kiekkoa) koulussa. 😄 So, you got it all right!

It is same here in Finland. You can say only "pelata kiekkoa" (to play hockey) and everyone understands what you game mean. 😮


Word "vasta" means " just" or "very recently or only now."


"I just came from school" "Tulin vasta nyt koulusta." Another example: Nytkö vasta tulit koulusta? (Did you come from school only now (late coming)?)


"Kiitos vaan (vain)" means actually just "thank you." It is kind of street language (quite common though) and it can be somehow translated as " I just want to thank you (for something....)"


If you have any questions, please let us know.

Thank you.

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Monday at 12:55 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Mekin (Not sure if that works) pelaamme lätkä koululla ("Koulussa"? InEnglish both "In school" and "At school" would be acceptable in this context; not sure if it's the same in Finnish.) täällä Kanadassa. :) My old school even has its own arena; kids play hockey and skate there for gym class all the time in winter. (We Canadians are funny, though; we have different kinds of hockey - ice hockey, floor hockey, field hockey -, but if we just say the word "hockey", we're referring to ice hockey. If we're talking about a different type of hockey, like floor hockey, we'll say "Floor hockey". :P)


I'm still getting used to the way "Vasta" works. :P And I also had another question about "Vaan"; I know it means "Just" or "Only", but I see it used in sentences like "Kiitos vaan," or something like that. Same with "Jo"; I know it means "Already", but I seem to see/hear it in places I wouldn't expect to, like "Sillä heräsinhän jo tunti sitten." Why exactly are those words used in situations like that?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 11:01 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Brian,


Thank you for your question.


In Finnish language, When you want to say you have to do something or must do something, you have to use a special sentence construction in Finnish. For this, you have the possibility of three verbs: täytyä, pitää and olla pakko. All three verbs express necessity. Olla pakko is the strongest necessity, pitää the weakest.


In this case, the word "pitää" is in negative form.


Negative

Genitive + ei tarvitse + infinitive


Finnish English

Minun ei tarvitse jäädä tänään ylitöihin. I don't have to stay and do overtime today.

Sinun ei tarvitse lukea monta paperia. You don't have to read many papers.

Hänen ei tarvitse lähteä työmatkalle Kiinaan. She doesn't have to leave on a work trip to China.

Meidän ei tarvitse tehdä lumitöitä pihassa. We don't have to do snow shoveling in the yard.

Teidän ei tarvitse muistaa soittaa. You don't have to remember to call.

Heidän ei tarvitse ostaa silmälasit They don't have to buy the sunglasses.

Anjan ei tarvitse tulla mukaan. Anja doesn't have to come along.


The object in the negative sentence always has to be in the partitive.


Finnish English

Eikö minun tarvitse varata lippua? Don't I have to reserve tickets?.

Teidän ei tarvitse muistaa jokaista sanaa. They don't have to remember every word.

Sinun ei tarvitse ostaa televisiota. You're not obligated to buy a television.

Marjan ei tarvitse syödä lääkettä. Marja doesn't have to take the medicine.




If you have any questions, please let us know.

Thank you.

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Brian
Sunday at 12:46 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hei, in the lesson notes there is an example:


"Eikö sinun pitänyt vain rentoutua?"

"Weren't you supposed to just relax?"


Shouldn't it be "Etkö" (in second person "you")? Not "Eiko" which is (he/she)?