Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FinnishPod101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 8 - What's Your Favorite Finnish Food? Michael Here.
Nico: Hei. I'm Nico.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to express likes and dislikes with regards to food, and how to place an order at a restaurant. The conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Nico: It's between Aino and Jukka.
Michael: The speakers are new colleagues, so they’ll be using formal Finnish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Aino: Tämä on kyllä kiva lounasravintola. Lounaslistakin näyttää hyvältä! Mutta en osaa päättää, mitä tilaisin.
Jukka: Lohikeitto on täällä hyvää, suosittelen sitä!
Aino: Voi, mutta siinä on porkkanaa, ja minä olen porkkanalle allerginen. Otan äyriäissalaatin.
Jukka: Minä en oikein pidä katkaravuista. Mutta porosta minä pidän, joten tänään tilaan poronkäristystä.
Aino: Hienoa, voimmekin sitten tilata!
Jukka:Tarjoilija! Anteeksi, tilaisin äyriäissalaatin, poronkäristyksen, sekä kivennäisvettä kahdelle, kiitos.
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Aino: Tämä on kyllä kiva lounasravintola. Lounaslistakin näyttää hyvältä! Mutta en osaa päättää, mitä tilaisin.
Jukka: Lohikeitto on täällä hyvää, suosittelen sitä!
Aino: Voi, mutta siinä on porkkanaa, ja minä olen porkkanalle allerginen. Otan äyriäissalaatin.
Jukka: Minä en oikein pidä katkaravuista. Mutta porosta minä pidän, joten tänään tilaan poronkäristystä.
Aino: Hienoa, voimmekin sitten tilata!
Jukka:Tarjoilija! Anteeksi, tilaisin äyriäissalaatin, poronkäristyksen, sekä kivennäisvettä kahdelle, kiitos.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Aino: This must be a nice restaurant for lunch. The lunch menu looks good! But I just can't decide what to order.
Jukka: The salmon soup is nice here, I recommend that!
Aino: Oh, but it has carrot in it, and I’m allergic to carrot. I’ll have the crustacean salad.
Jukka: I don't really care for shrimp. But I do like reindeer, so today I’ll order the sautéed reindeer.
Aino: Great, so we can place our order then!
Jukka: Waitress! Excuse me, I would like to order a shrimp salad, sautéed reindeer, and mineral water for two, please.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Nico, what are lunches like at Finnish schools and workplaces?
Nico: As we said in another lesson, Finnish school children can get a free meal every day at their schools. Students can get a discount at university-run cafeterias as well, thanks to government support.
Michael: What about workplaces?
Nico: Cafeterias and restaurants also exist at most bigger companies, and the employees can enjoy a reasonably priced lunch. Often these types of lunches are served buffet-style, or there are a few options on a daily list.
Michael: How about normal restaurants?
Nico: Many restaurants also offer a lunch list, which contains a selection of dishes for a cheaper price. Restaurants offering Finnish, Italian, and Chinese food are especially popular lunch places.
Michael: Do people like to bring a lunch-box from home?
Nico: Bringing your own lunch to work or school is quite rare. The typical lunch break is between 30 minutes and one-hour long.
Michael: Good to know. Are there any useful words we should know?
Nico: Hmm, how about ruokatunti
Michael: This means "lunch hour." Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Nico: lounasravintola [natural native speed]
Michael: lunch restaurant
Nico: lounasravintola [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: lounasravintola [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: lounaslista [natural native speed]
Michael: lunch menu
Nico: lounaslista [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: lounaslista [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: tilata [natural native speed]
Michael: to order
Nico: tilata [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: tilata [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: suositella [natural native speed]
Michael: to recommend
Nico: suositella [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: suositella [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: allerginen [natural native speed]
Michael: allergic
Nico: allerginen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: allerginen [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: ottaa [natural native speed]
Michael: to take
Nico: ottaa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: ottaa [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: pitää [natural native speed]
Michael: to like
Nico: pitää [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: pitää [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: tarjoilija [natural native speed]
Michael: waitress, waiter
Nico: tarjoilija [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: tarjoilija [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: äyriäissalaatti [natural native speed]
Michael: crustacean salad, seafood salad
Nico: äyriäissalaatti[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: äyriäissalaatti [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Nico: poronkäristys [natural native speed]
Michael: sautéed reindeer
Nico: poronkäristys[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nico: poronkäristys [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Nico: lounaslista
Michael: meaning "lunch menu."
Nico: It’s made up of two parts- lounas, "lunch," and lista, "list.”
Michael: So it literally means “lunch list.” When can you use this word?
Nico: When you’re talking about a selection of foods available at restaurants or cafes during lunch time. If you take out the word lounas, "lunch," you are left with the word lista, "list." By adding different words to replace lounas, you can make, for example, "drink menu," juomalista.
Michael: How about “À la carte menu" ?
Nico: À la carte lista. By the way, the loanword “menu” is also widely used in Finnish.
Michael: Can you give us an example using “lunch menu”?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Lounaslista on voimassa vain kello kahteen saakka.
Michael: ..which means "The lunch menu is valid only until two o'clock." Okay, what's the next word?
Nico: allerginen
Michael: meaning "allergic to."
Nico: The word allerginen refers to someone being allergic to something. An allergy is allergia. You can use this word when you need to express that you yourself or someone else is allergic to something.
Michael: What are some common allergies in Finland?
Nico: Some of the most common allergies are “dairy allergy,” which is maitotuote-allergia, “fish allergy,” or kala-allergia, and “nut allergy,” or pähkinä-allergia.
Michael: Can you give us an example in a sentence?
Nico: Sure. For example, you can say.. Veljeni on erittäin allerginen kalalle.
Michael: .. which means "My brother is extremely allergic to fish." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you’ll learn how to order food at a restaurant and to express likes and dislikes regarding food. Whether you're talking about food preferences or just making small talk, it's important to be able to communicate that you like or don't like something. In this lesson, you'll learn how to say what you like and don’t like. First, let's go over how to say you like something.
Nico: You can use a simple sentence pattern- personal pronoun plus verb plus object.
Michael: What if you want to really emphasize that you like something, how can we say we love it? Is the pattern the same?
Nico: Yes. To say that you love something, you just use the verb rakastaa, “to love,” instead of pitää, “to like.”
Michael: Okay, let’s see some examples.
Nico: Minä pidän kakusta.
Michael: “I like cake.”
Nico: Hän rakastaa sienipiirakkaa.
Michael: “She loves mushroom quiche.”
Nico: Listeners, keep in mind that when you’re saying you like something using the verb pitää, the object is in the elative case. The ending for the elative in Finnish is -sta or -stä. For example, Minä pidän kissoista.
Michael: “I like cats.”
Nico: On the other hand, when you’re saying that you love something using the verb rakastaa, the object is in the partitive case. The ending for the partitive in Finnish is -a, -ä, -ta, or -tä.
Michael: So what would “I love cats” be?
Nico: Minä rakastan kissoja.
Michael: Next, let's go over how to say you don't like something.
Nico: The pattern is pretty much the same, but this time you can either change the “like,” which is pitää, to the negative form, ei pidä, meaning “does not like,” or use the verb vihata.
Michael: Which means “to hate,” to express that you hate something. Remember that you need to change the verbs to the correct personal form. Nico, can you give us some examples?
Nico: Minä en pidä kakusta.
Michael: “I don’t like cake.”
Nico: Hän vihaa sienipiirakkaa
Michael: “She hates mushroom quiche.” Now let’s learn how to place an order at a Finnish restaurant.
Nico: Sure! After calling the waiter, you can ask for a menu by saying Saisinko ruokalistan, kiitos. Ruokalista means "menu" in Finnish. As we said, lista actually means “a list,” so ruokalista literally means “the food list.”
Michael: How is a menu normally divided in Finland?
Nico: On the menu you'll find alkupalat,
Michael: Meaning "appetizers," a large variety of dishes from salads to meat….
Nico: keitot ja salaatit,
Michael: the “soups and salads,”
Nico: pääruoka
Michael: "main course,"
Nico: And finally jälkiruoka.
Michael: “Dessert.” Which are some dishes you can find on a typical Finnish menu?
Nico: graavilohi
Michael: This is fresh salmon preserved in herbs.
Nico: Another dish with salmon is lohikeitto.
Michael: It’s a salmon soup made with potatoes and other vegetables, and flavored with dill.
Nico: A common meat dish is poronkäristys.
Michael: That’s sauteed reindeer served with mashed potatoes and lingonberry jam.
Nico: A typical dessert is mustikkapiirakka,
Michael: which is blueberry pie. Now let’s take a look at what to say when you want to order.
Nico: You can start your order by saying tilaisin, “I would like to order.” Then you can say the names of the dishes you’d like to order, using their genitive case.
Michael: For example, if you want to say “I would like to order salmon soup?”
Nico: Tilaisin lohikeiton.
Michael: Remember that when the name of the dish is already in plural, you can say the name as it is, without changing it to the genitive case. For example, “I would like to order herring steaks.”
Nico: Tilaisin silakkapihvit. When you order drinks, they are usually put in the partitive form. For example vesi, meaning “water,” becomes vettä.
Michael: If you’re ordering for other people as well, what can you say?
Nico: You can add how many people the drinks are for. For example, kahdelle.
Michael: “For two.” Can you give us some practical examples?
Nico: Tilaisin vettä kolmelle, kiitos.
Michael: “I would like to order water for three, please.”
Nico: “Tarjoilija, anteeksi. Tilaisin poronkäristyksen, silakkapihvit, ja punaviiniä kahdelle, kiitos.”
Michael: “I would like to order sauteed reindeer, herring steaks, and red wine for two people.” Listeners, make sure to check the lesson notes for more examples and explanations!

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nico: Hei hei.

5 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Have you ever tried reindeer meat?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:22 PM
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Moi Corinna!


I do understand how the way "en osaa" is used in this lesson might be a bit confusing!

It is also a phrase, "en osaa päättää" - "I can't decide", literally meaning "I don't know how to decide". There simply are too many good options on the menu, so Aino kind of loses her skills to think and decide.

Another example of "osata" and "voida" in the negative:

"En osaa lukea." = "I don't know how to read." (I.e., the person does not have the skills or the know-how to read)

"En voi lukea." = "I can't read." (Reason could be for example, that the person doesn't have his/her glasses on, that the text is too scary, etc, etc...)


En osaa selittää tätä hyvin. - I don't know how to explain this well. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Monday at 03:40 PM
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Moi Päivi!


Haha okay. I'll keep that in mind. :wink:


Okay, that sounds simple enough to remember. But I'm still a little confused on why "En osaa" used here instead of "En voi" for "I can't decide". :sweat_smile: :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:21 PM
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Moi Corinna!


Yes, be sure to try it with mashed potatoes and lingonberry jam! :wink:


You are correct that both "osaan" and "voin" mean "I can". However, "osaan" means that you have the skills to do something, e.g. "osaan ajaa autoa" is actually "I know how to drive a car", where as "voin" means that you are able to do something, e.g. "voin tehdä sinulle ruokaa, koska olet kipeä" - "I can cook for you as you are ill".


Best Wishes, Parhain terveisin,

Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Thursday at 03:33 PM
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No, I haven't tried sautéed reindeer yet, but I probably will try it whenever I get to visit Finland. :wink:


Oh, and when would you use "Osan" (Or "Osat", etc) as opposed to "Voin" ("Voit", etc)? They both mean "can", right?