Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FinnishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 10 - Visiting a Finnish Dentist. Eric here.
Päivi: Hei! I'm Päivi.
Eric: In this lesson you’ll become familiar with modal verbs. The conversation takes place in a dentist’s office.
Päivi: It's between Jukka and a dentist.
Eric: The speakers are strangers, so they’ll use both formal and informal Finnish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Hammaslääkäri: No niin, päivää, olen hammaslääkäri Korhonen. Teilläkö oli viisaudenhammas kipeä?
Jukka: Kyllä, vasen alahammas on todella kipeä. Minun on pakko syödä vain keittoja, koska hampaaseen sattuu niin paljon.
Hammaslääkäri: Ahaa. Katsotaanpa. Avatkaa suu.
Jukka: Selvä.
Hammaslääkäri: Teidän täytyy avata suuta vielä hiukan enemmän, jotta näen paremmin.
Hammaslääkäri: Hammas on todella tulehtunut, ja se pitää poistaa. Sitä ennen teidän täytyy syödä antibioottikuuri.
Jukka: Aivan.
Hammaslääkäri: Teidän ei tarvitse ottaa antibiootteja varten paperireseptiä, vaan lähetän reseptin sähköisesti suoraan apteekkiin.
Jukka: Selvä, kiitos paljon!
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Dentist: Well, good afternoon, I'm the dentist, Korhonen. So you had a sore wisdom tooth?
Jukka: Yes, the bottom left tooth is really sore. I have to eat only soup, because the tooth hurts so much.
Dentist: Okay. Let's see. Open your mouth please.
Jukka: Okay.
Dentist: You have to open your mouth a little bit more, so I can see better.
Dentist: The tooth is really inflamed, and it has to be removed. Before that you must take a course of antibiotics.
Jukka: Right.
Dentist: You don't have to get a paper prescription for the antibiotics, I will send the prescription electronically directly to the pharmacy.
Jukka: Okay, thank you so much!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Päivi, are electronic or digital prescriptions common in Finland?
Päivi: Yes, they’re more common than paper ones.
Eric: What are they and how do they work?
Päivi: An electronic prescription, or e-prescription, is a prescription that a doctor creates and signs digitally. It’s then saved into a database, which is called Reseptikeskus...
Eric: which means “prescription central.”
Päivi: Based on the information fetched from this database, any pharmacy can provide the requested medicine.
Eric: That way, less paper is wasted and the data doesn’t get lost.
Päivi: The digital prescriptions will remain in the database for 30 months. Then they’re archived, and you need the patient's permission to access them.
Eric: When did this system start?
Päivi: The first electronic prescription was written in Turku in May 2010. Since then, the system has become widespread, and now the public health services and all pharmacies are using it. Everyone will need to adopt this system by the end of 2016.
Eric: It sounds really convenient! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Päivi: alahammas [natural native speed]
Eric: bottom tooth
Päivi: alahammas[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: alahammas [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: sattua [natural native speed]
Eric: to hurt
Päivi: sattua[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: sattua [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: täytyä [natural native speed]
Eric: to have to
Päivi: täytyä[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: täytyä [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: tulehtunut [natural native speed]
Eric: inflamed
Päivi: tulehtunut[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: tulehtunut [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: antibioottikuuri [natural native speed]
Eric: course of antibiotics
Päivi: antibioottikuuri[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: antibioottikuuri [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: paperiresepti [natural native speed]
Eric: paper prescription
Päivi: paperiresepti[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: paperiresepti [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: resepti [natural native speed]
Eric: prescription
Päivi: resepti[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: resepti [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: sähköinen [natural native speed]
Eric: electronic
Päivi: sähköinen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: sähköinen [natural native speed]
Eric: And lastly..
Päivi: apteekki [natural native speed]
Eric: pharmacy
Päivi: apteekki[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: apteekki [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Päivi: antibioottikuuri
Eric: meaning "a course of antibiotics."
Päivi: The noun antibiootti means "antibiotic," and the noun kuuri means "regimen."
Eric: You can use this word whenever you’re talking about a course or a regimen of antibiotics as a medical treatment prescribed by a doctor. Can you give us an example using this word?
Päivi: Sure. For example, you can say.. Antibioottikuurit ovat hyvin yleisiä.
Eric: ..which means "Courses of antibiotics are very common." Okay, what's the next word?
Päivi: paperiresepti
Eric: meaning "paper prescription."
Päivi: The noun paperi means "paper," and the noun resepti, means "recipe" or "prescription."
Eric: You can use this word when you’re talking about a paper prescription, that is, an order of medicine written on paper by a doctor. Can you give us an example using this word?
Päivi: Sure. For example, you can say.. Paperireseptin saattaa hukata helposti.
Eric: .. which means "You might lose a paper prescription easily." Okay, what's the next phrase?
Päivi: sähköinen resepti,
Eric: meaning "electronic prescription."
Päivi: You can also say e-resepti where the first part of the word, e-, derives from the English word "electronic." This version is more common in spoken language.
Eric: You can use these words when referring to medical prescriptions that are ordered and handled electronically.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Päivi: Sure. For example, you can say.. E-resepti on erittäin kätevä.
Eric: .. which means "An electronic prescription is very handy." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll become more familiar with modal verbs that express necessity.
Päivi: In this lesson, Jukka went to the dentist. The dentist was using modal verbs when giving Jukka instructions, for example, Teidän täytyy avata suuta vielä hiukan enemmän.
Eric: “You must open your mouth a little bit more.”
Päivi: Teidän täytyy syödä antibioottikuuri.
Eric: “You must take a course of antibiotics."
Päivi: The modal verbs täytyä, meaning “must,” and pitää, which is “have to,” express obligation and necessity.
Eric: They are always in the singular 3rd person, and the subject connected to them is in the genitive case. Let’s give some other examples.
Päivi: Sure. Let’s start with täytyä. Minun täytyy lähteä.
Eric: “I must go.”
Päivi: Hänen täytyy mennä töihin.
Eric: “He has to go to work.”
Päivi: Here are some examples with pitää. Minun pitää tehdä tämä loppuun.
Eric: “I need to finish this.”
Päivi: Sinun pitää pyytää häneltä anteeksi.
Eric: “You must apologize to her.” Ok, what’s the next modal verb?
Päivi: The modal verb tarvita, which also expresses necessity, but is usually present in negative sentences.
Eric: It’s also always in the singular 3rd person, and the subject connected to it is in the genitive case.
Päivi: The verb tarvita is related to the noun tarve, meaning “need,” and is thus expressing how something needs to or doesn’t need to be done. Here’s an example from the dialogue. Teidän ei tarvitse ottaa antibiootteja varten paperireseptiä.
Eric: “You don’t need to get a paper prescription for the antibiotics.”
Päivi: A different example could be Sinun ei tarvitse syödä kaikkea, jos et jaksa.
Eric: “You don’t have to eat everything if you can’t.”
Päivi: Meidän ei tarvitse herätä aikaisin.
Eric: “We don’t have to wake up early.”

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Päivi: Hei hei!

4 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Try to write a sentence in Finnish using a modal verb.

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:09 PM
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Hello Arash,


Thank you for your comments! Sorry if you feel this lesson is wasting your valuable time. At the same time, we hope that some other students may find it more useful.


Let us know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Arash
Saturday at 09:39 PM
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Päivi: sähköinen resepti,

Eric: meaning "electronic prescription."

Päivi: You can also say e-resepti where the first part of the word, e-, derives from the English word "electronic." This version is more common in spoken language.

Eric: You can use these words when referring to medical prescriptions that are ordered and handled electronically.


Another time-wasting piece.

Arash
Saturday at 09:36 PM
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Päivi: paperiresepti

Eric: meaning "paper prescription."

Päivi: The noun paperi means "paper," and the noun resepti, means "recipe" or "prescription."

Eric: You can use this word when you’re talking about a paper prescription, that is, an order of medicine written on paper by a doctor.



REALLY? Is that how you fill up the lesson?