Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FinnishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 14 - Finding Your Way in Finland. Eric Here.
Päivi: Hei! I'm Päivi.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn about giving and listening to instructions using the internal locative cases. The conversation takes place on the phone.
Päivi: It's between Aino and Vilja.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they’ll use informal Finnish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Vilja: Hei Aino! Olen juuri lähdössä töistä. Tulen täältä suoraan sinne teidän uuteen asuntoon.
Aino: Hei Vilja! Olen itse vielä töissä, mutta lähden pian. Olemme varmaan samaan aikaan perillä.
Vilja: Ok, kiva juttu! Mutta miten löydän perille?
Aino: Jää pois metrosta Kalasataman kohdalla. Hyppää sitten bussiin numero 56.
Vilja: Selvä. Missä kohtaa hyppään pois?
Aino: Jää pois bussista kun bussi ohittaa Joukolan puiston. Tulen sinua pysäkille vastaan.
Vilja: Hienoa!
Aino: Käydään sitten yhdessä kaupassa, ja mennään sitten asunnolle.
Vilja: Sopii! Nähdään pian!
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Vilja: Hi Aino! I'm just about to leave work. I'll come to that new apartment of yours straight from here.
Aino: Hi Vilja! I'm still at work myself, but I'll leave soon. We’ll probably arrive at the same time.
Vilja: Ok, great! But how do I find my way there?
Aino: Get off the subway at Kalasatama (Fish Harbor). Then jump on bus number 56.
Vilja: All right. At which point do I jump off?
Aino: Get off the bus when the bus passes Joukola Park. I will come and meet you at the bus stop.
Vilja: Great!
Aino: Let's go to the supermarket together, and then to the apartment.
Vilja: That's fine! See you soon!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Päivi, what can you tell us about public transportation in Finland?
Päivi: Public transportation is a popular way to travel in Finland. Each county is responsible for their own public transport, and they can either arrange it themselves or buy services from a suitable company.
Eric: What about transport between cities?
Päivi: Transport between cities includes buses, trains, and planes. Independent companies take care of the bus and plane transport, while the trains are run exclusively by the state-owned VR-group.
Eric: What about Helsinki?
Päivi: Helsinki and the metropolitan area around it has the most comprehensive public transport system, with trains, buses, trams, its own subway system and an international airport. It’s the only city in Finland with tram and subway traffic.
Eric: Listeners, if you want more detailed information about transport in Helsinki, be sure to check out the lesson notes!
Päivi: In smaller cities and in the countryside, public transport is often limited to either the bus or trains, and the schedules can be sparse - buses might run only once an hour, and the services stop early in the evening.
Eric: I suppose this is due to the lower population density in those areas.
Päivi: Yes, that’s right. Finally, the Finnish phrase for “public transport” is julkinen liikenne.
Eric: Good to know. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Päivi: lähteä [natural native speed]
Eric: to leave
Päivi: lähteä[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: lähteä [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: asunto [natural native speed]
Eric: apartment
Päivi: asunto[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: asunto [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: varmaan [natural native speed]
Eric: probably, surely
Päivi: varmaan[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: varmaan [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: löytää [natural native speed]
Eric: to find
Päivi: löytää[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: löytää [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: jäädä pois [natural native speed]
Eric: to get off
Päivi: jäädä pois[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: jäädä pois [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: hypätä [natural native speed]
Eric: to jump
Päivi: hypätä [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: hypätä [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: kohta [natural native speed]
Eric: point
Päivi: kohta[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: kohta [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: ohittaa [natural native speed]
Eric: to pass
Päivi: ohittaa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: ohittaa [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Päivi: tulla vastaan [natural native speed]
Eric: to come against, to come and meet
Päivi: tulla vastaan[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: tulla vastaan [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Päivi: yhdessä [natural native speed]
Eric: together
Päivi: yhdessä[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Päivi: yhdessä [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Päivi: samaan aikaan
Eric: meaning "at the same time."
Päivi: sama means "same" and aika means "time."
Eric: You can use this phrase whenever you need to express that something is happening at the same time as something else. Can you give us an example using this word, Päivi?
Päivi: Sure. For example, you can say.. Voin lähteä samaan aikaan kuin sinä.
Eric: ..which means "I can leave at the same time as you."
Päivi: Another word, samalla, can be also be used to say "at the same time," but this word is an adverb, meaning "at one time" or "in the process." Samaan aikaan can also mean that something happened somewhere else at the same time, while samalla most often means something happens at the same place at the same time.
Eric: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Päivi: hypätä pois
Eric: meaning "to jump off"
Päivi:Hypätä pois is a casual way of expressing that you are getting off some kind of transport.
Eric: This is usually used in relaxed, casual conversations, and not in formal situations.
Päivi: In more formal situations you can use the expression jäädä pois meaning "to get off," instead.
Eric: You can extend this phrase by adding the noun for the mode of transport you are getting on or off of.
Päivi: For example, hyppää pois autosta means "jump out of the car."
Eric: Can you give us an example sentence using this verb?
Päivi: Sure. You can say.. Hyppää pois junasta kolmannella asemalla.
Eric: .. which means "Jump off the train at the third station." Okay, what's the next phrase?
Päivi: tulla vastaan
Eric: meaning "to come against, to come and meet." You can use this phrase when you want to express that someone is meeting someone else on the way to another place.
Päivi: Right, for example, when your friend is coming to your house, but she doesn't know exactly how to get there, you can go and meet her on the way there, so you can say Voin tulla sinua vastaan.
Eric: "I can come and meet you."
Eric: Can we have one more example?
Päivi: You can say Voitko tulla vastaan ja auttaa painavien ostoskassien kanssa?
Eric: .. which means "Can you come and meet me and help me with the heavy shopping bags?" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about giving and listening to instructions using the internal locative cases.
Päivi: When giving instructions, you may need to use the external or internal locative cases to explain where something is, where you should go, or where you should get off.
Eric: In the last lesson, we had a look at external locative cases. This time, let's have a look at the internal locative cases.
Päivi: In Finnish, they are called Inessiivi, Elatiivi and Illatiivi
Eric: Let’s start with the inessive case.
Päivi: The inessive most often refers to something being within or in close contact with something.
Eric: The equivalents for the inessive case in English would be the prepositions "in," "within," or "at."
Päivi: The case ending for the inessive is -ssa or -ssä.
Eric: Listeners, in the lesson notes, you can find a short list of declined words for each case. Let’s give an example of a sentence using the inessive case.
Päivi: For example, Olen vielä töissä, mutta lähden pian.
Eric: “I am still at work, but I will leave soon.” Ok, now let’s see the elative case.
Päivi: The elative case, elatiivi, expresses a movement from within or from close contact with something. It can be also used in a more abstract meaning as in minusta, “in my opinion.”
Eric: The English equivalents for the elative case can be the prepositions "from" or "out of."
Päivi: The elative suffix is -sta or -stä.
Eric: The elative case can also be used in connection with certain verbs. Please give us an example.
Päivi: We have Olen juuri lähdössä töistä.
Eric: which means “I am just about to leave from work.” Finally, let’s see the illative case.
Päivi: The illative case expresses movement into or to close contact with something.
Eric: In English, the equivalents for the illative case would be the prepositions "into" or "to."
Päivi: Forming the illative case is a little bit more complicated than the previous cases. However, in the simplest form, the illative can be recognized from the -n ending.
Eric: Are there some indications we could follow?
Päivi: Yes, there are three main cases. First, if the word stem ends in a single vowel, the illative case is formed by extending that vowel and adding the -n at the end. For example kauppa, meaning "shop," becomes kauppaan.
Eric: What’s the second case?
Päivi: If the word has one syllable and ends with two vowels, such as tee, "tea," you add an h in the middle, before the vowel and the illative case ending so that you get teehen.
Eric: And the last case?
Päivi: When the word contains two or more syllables, and the word stem ends with two vowels, the illative case ending is -seen. For example Suomi, which is the Finnish name for “Finland,” becomes Suomeen.
Eric: Ok. To wrap up, could you give us an example of a sentence with the illative case?
Päivi: Hyppää bussiin numero 56.
Eric: This means “Jump on bus number 56.”

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Päivi: Hei hei!

3 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Try to give instructions in Finnish! For example, how can a visitor find their way to the city centre from the train or bus station in your city?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:31 PM
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Hi Elsie,

Thank you for your question. You can use both words, but actually better to use word "kohdassa". "Missä kohdassa jään pois?" and "Missä kohtaa jään pois". If you want to use the word "kohdalla", you should ask. " Millä kohdalla jään pois" which is also understandable Finnish but not as good as the two former sentences. I hope this helps.


If you have any questions, please let us know.

Thank you.


Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

ELSIE PARKER
Friday at 11:46 AM
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is the word "kohdalla" which is used in this lesson from the same stem of the word

"kohtaa", also used in this lesson.

If kohtaa means "point", I'm not sure/confused about what kohdalla means in the sentance:

"Jää pois metrosta Kalasataman kohdalla" which is translated as "Get off the subway at Kalasatama (Fish Harbor)"

Does it also mean "at that Kalasataman POINT?"


Maybe the words aren't even related at all.

I am perhaps just not understanding the translation for "Jää pois metrosta Kalasataman kohdalla"

Thank you for your help.

ELSIE PARKER