Dialogue

Vocabulary

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23 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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Hi FinnishPod101 listeners!

What is your morning routine like?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:43 AM
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That's great, Corinna! Hienoa! :smile:


Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Saturday at 03:40 PM
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Moi, Päivi!


Oh, I see. I think I get it. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 02:35 AM
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Moi Corinna!


Actually the '-aan' ending here is more related to the ownership (the person doing something, is "owning" the object that is being talked about), and also expressing that the action is/was not finished yet.

For example,

"Mies pesi autoaan" - ' The man was washing his car'

"Mies pesee autoaan" - 'The man is washing his car'

vs.

"Mies pesi auton" - 'The man washed a/the car'

"Mies pesi autonsa" - 'The man washed his car"

"Mies pesee auton" - 'The man is washing a/the car'


I dare to say though, that this expression is not used that often in daily conversation. It may appear in books and films though, as it sounds a bit 'poetic'.


Best Wishes, Parhain terveisin,

Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Saturday at 03:37 PM
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So if I understand right, ifan action is happening right now, there is an "-aan / ään" ending on the object of the sentence. Is that right?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:37 AM
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Hei Carolyn!


Not to worry, the conjugations and different cases in Finnish can be quite tricky. In this video lesson, some of the examples were more difficult, you're right. I try to break down the few difficult ones here:


1. Example from the video: 'nainen on harjaamassa hampaitaan'

This sentence is expressing, that the woman is in the middle of brushing her teeth, i.e. the action of brushing is happening right now. The verb, 'harjata' ("to brush") is in the so called III infinitive in this example.

A more simple way to say the same sentence would be for example:

'nainen harjaa hampaansa', "the woman brushes her teeth" or even more simple, 'nainen harjaa hampaat', "the woman brushes teeth".


2. Example from the video: 'tyttö pesee kasvojaan'

This sentence is also expressing, that the girl is in the middle of the action of washing her face right now.

A more simple way to say the same sentence would be 'tyttö pesee kasvonsa', "the girl washes (/is washing) her face", or just simply 'tyttö pesee kasvot', "the girl washes face".


3. Example from the video: 'perhe syö aamiaista'

This sentence is yet again expressing, that the family is in the middle of eating their breakfast, i.e. the action of eating is not finished yet, and there is still food on the table. :wink:

In this example, you use the partitive case. The partitive is used to express the object, especially when the object is something you can't really measure or count. For example, 'juon maitoa', "I drink milk" or 'syön mansikoita', "I eat strawberries."

Another way to say the same sentence is for example, 'perhe syö aamiaisen', "the family eats the breakfast", but in this example, the whole breakfast is eaten, so the action is finished, and the food is gone! :smile:


I hope this helps a little bit. I know all these different conjugations and case endings can be frustrating sometimes!


Best Wishes,

Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Carolyn
Friday at 06:43 AM
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I really don't get how you can conjugate the nouns.......How the heck do you get to kasvojaan??? ' Poika heraa aamulla' is the only sentence that I could form on my own. Why is the family eating from breakfast, & not just breakfast? Why can't the nainen just harjaa her hampaat? I didn't even think you could put -ssa on a verb. Would you please go into that translation more? Tahnk you. It's driving me nuts. And it sure isn't a translation for beginners.

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 07:36 PM
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Hi Vo the dat!


In Finnish, words have different grammatical cases, and they are also conjugated and modified according to their roles in sentences. Each word has a stem, and different cases and conjugations are added to the stem depending on the situation. In this lesson for example, there were words 'nainen' ("woman"), 'juoda' ("to drink"), and 'vesi' ("water"). The sample sentence was "woman is drinking water", 'nainen juo vettä'. In this sentence, the verb 'juoda' is in the third person singular, and the noun 'vesi' is in the partitive form, 'vettä'.

It can be quite tricky, but that also makes learning Finnish interesting and challenging! Don't give up! ;)


Päivi


Team FinnishPod101.com

Vo the dat
Thursday at 10:56 PM
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a

Vo the dat
Wednesday at 04:05 PM
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This is a cool video and it was cool but why did the word vesi and aamianen and some words has changed in sentence. :thumbsup::sweat_smile::smile:

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:08 PM
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Hi Sophia!


Thank you for very good questions! You are actually correct, that the English translations with some of the lesson notes are incorrect. I will notify our team about this and fix our mistake asap!


So for example, the phrase "Nainen juo vettä.", is repeated in the same form multiple times.

The correct English translations for this would be:

in non-past tense: Nainen juo vettä. The Woman drinks water.

in present progressive tense: Nainen juo vettä. The woman is drinking water.

in past tense: Nainen joi vettä. The woman was drinking water.


The verb harjata is conjugated differently, perhaps by mistake, but in any case also in correct way. The present progressive tense can be said in two different ways. Hope this doesn't confuse you now! For example the verb harjata can be said in the present progressive tense in two ways. "Nainen harjaa hampaitaan", "Nainen on harjaamassa hampaitaan". Then the sentence "Tyttö pesee kasvojaan", can be also said "tyttö on pesemässä kasvojaan".


My apologies for our mistakes!


Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com