Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hello, and welcome to FinnishPod101.com! This is Lower Beginner Season 1, lesson 13. Take Your Hands Out of Your Pockets in Finland. I’m Brandon.
Nico: Hei kaikki, minä olen Nico. Hi everybody, I’m Nico.
Brandon: In this lesson, we’re going to talk about plurals. The dialogue takes place at home. Petri’s daughter is just about to leave for school in the morning.
Nico: The conversation is between Petri, Satu, and Viivi. They're members of the same family, and they'll be speaking standard Finnish in the casual register.
Brandon: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Petri: Viivi, älä sitten juokse noilla kengillä lätäköissä. Ne eivät pidä vettä.
Satu: Ja laita paita housuihin.
Petri: Äläkä unohda käsineitä kouluun.
Satu: Hyvää koulupäivää!
Viivi: Hyvää työpäivää! Heippa!
Brandon: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Petri: Viivi, älä sitten juokse noilla kengillä lätäköissä. Ne eivät pidä vettä.
Satu: Ja laita paita housuihin.
Petri: Äläkä unohda käsineitä kouluun.
Satu: Hyvää koulupäivää!
Viivi: Hyvää työpäivää! Heippa!
Brandon: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Petri: Viivi, älä sitten juokse noilla kengillä lätäköissä. Ne eivät pidä vettä.
Viivi, don’t go running in puddles with those shoes, okay. They aren’t watertight.
Satu: Ja laita paita housuihin.
And tuck your shirt into your trousers.
Petri: Äläkä unohda käsineitä kouluun.
And don’t forget your gloves at school.
Satu: Hyvää koulupäivää!
Have a nice day at school!
Viivi: Hyvää työpäivää! Heippa!
Have a nice day at work! Bye bye!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: How old do you think Viivi is?
Nico: Hmm, I’d guess she’s something like seven or eight, so she’d be in the first or second grade at school.
Brandon: She seems to be going to school by herself, though.
Nico: Sure. Most kids do in Finland actually. We don’t have a tradition of driving kids to school, though of course, there are some parents who do it.
Brandon: What if it’s a long way to school?
Nico: Well, if the distance to the nearest school is more than three or five km, the local authorities are required to provide transportation.
Brandon: I see, that’s convenient. Okay. now let’s onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
juosta [natural native speed]
to run
juosta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
juosta [natural native speed]
Next:
kenkä [natural native speed]
shoe
kenkä [slowly - broken down by syllable]
kenkä [natural native speed]
Next:
lätäkkö [natural native speed]
puddle
lätäkkö [slowly - broken down by syllable]
lätäkkö [natural native speed]
Next:
pitää [natural native speed]
to hold, to hold onto, to like, to have
pitää [slowly - broken down by syllable]
pitää [natural native speed]
Next:
laittaa [natural native speed]
to put, to prepare food
laittaa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
laittaa [natural native speed]
Next:
paita [natural native speed]
shirt, blouse
paita [slowly - broken down by syllable]
paita [natural native speed]
Next:
housut [natural native speed]
trousers, pants, slacks
housut [slowly - broken down by syllable]
housut [natural native speed]
Next:
käsine [natural native speed]
glove
käsine [slowly - broken down by syllable]
käsine [natural native speed]
Next:
koulupäivä [natural native speed]
schoolday
koulupäivä [slowly - broken down by syllable]
koulupäivä [natural native speed]
And Last
työpäivä [natural native speed]
workday
työpäivä [slowly - broken down by syllable]
työpäivä [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.What’s the first word we’ll look at?
Nico: It’s pitää. You may already be familiar with it in the sense “to like”, as in Veera pitää jäätelöstä
Brandon: It means “Veera likes ice cream”. So you’re saying it has more meanings?
Nico: That’s right. The basic meaning is “to hold” as in Pitäisitkö kirjaani hetken? which means “Could you hold my book for a second?”
Brandon: But in this lesson it was used for being watertight.
Nico: Yes, that’s a special case of holding. If a container is watertight, it holds water inside. If shoes are watertight, they keep water out.
Brandon: Ahh, Got it.
Nico: It can even be a helping verb meaning “to have to”, as in Minun pitää nyt mennä - “I have to go now”.
Brandon: Okay. What’s the next word?
Nico: Housut.
Brandon: That’s “trousers”, right?
Nico: Right. It’s the most generic word for all kinds of trousers, pants, slacks and so on.
Brandon: So basically anything you wear from the waist down that isn’t a skirt?
Nico: Yes. It’s used for both men’s and women’s garments, and by adding various specifiers you get different kinds of garments. For example, by adding sukka, which means “sock”, you get sukkahousut, or “tights”.
Brandon: Housut is a plural form, just like the English “trousers”, right?
Nico: That’s a good point, it is.
Brandon: Okay. What’s the next word?
Nico: Käsine, or “glove”. That’s usually the kind of thing that has all fingers separated.
Brandon: Ok if that’s your word for glove, What would you call mittens.
Nico: That could be rukkanen, if it’s made of leather or fabric, and lapanen, if it’s made of wool. Hanska is commonly used as well, but it could have fingers either together or separately.
Brandon: Those are also words you’re likely to see used in the plural. Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Brandon: In this lesson, we’re going to learn about plurals in Finnish.
Nico: I think our listeners already know that the nominative plural ending is -t or -T . You’re probably also getting the hang of the various case endings used in the singular forms of words.
Brandon: let me guess, we have to learn a whole new set of endings for the plural!
Nico: No, don’t worry. Most of the endings are the same as in the singular, you just add -i- before them.
Brandon: That’s it? That doesn’t sound too bad.
Nico: Well… There’s a bit more to it, but let’s start with the basics. Let’s take, say, the word käsine, or “glove”. You just add -i- and then the case ending you need.
Brandon: Let’s run through all the forms. I’ll say the name of the case and the rough English equivalent, and you say singular first and then the plural.
Nico: Okay. As always, don’t worry if you don’t remember the names of the cases. Most Finns don’t remember them, either. We just use them because we need a way to refer to each case.
Brandon: Okay. Nominative.
Nico: Käsine, käsineet
Brandon: Partitive, “part of glove”.
Nico: Käsinettä, käsineitä
Brandon: Genitive, “glove’s”
Nico: Käsineen, käsineiden
Brandon: Inessive, “in glove”
Nico: Käsineeseen, käsineisiin
Brandon: Elative, “from glove”
Nico: Käsineestä, käsineistä
Brandon: Illative, “into glove”
Nico: Käsineeseen, käsineisiin
Brandon: Adessive, “on glove”
Nico: Käsineellä, käsineillä
Brandon: Ablative, “from glove”
Nico: Käsineeltä, käsineiltä
Brandon: Allative, “onto glove”
Nico: Käsineelle, käsineille
Brandon: It sounds to me like there’s more difference than just the additional -i-.
Nico: That’s quite true, very good! The long -ee- sound at the end of the stem gets shortened before the -i-. So you don’t add the -i- to käsinee- but to käsine-.
Brandon: I see. Does that happen to all long vowels?
Nico: Yes. For example, the inessive singular form of the word maa, “country,” is maassa, but the plural is maissa instead of maaissa.
Brandon: Okay. Let’s have a look at some other words, for example “school”.
Nico: That’s an easy one. The stem koulu doesn’t change at all, it’s the same in all cases both in singular and plural. However, the plural marker -i- changes into a -j- when it’s between two vowels.
Brandon: That happens in the partitive and genitive cases, right?
Nico: Yes. The partitive singular is koulua, and plural is kouluja instead of kouluia. The genitive singular is koulun, and the plural is koulujen instead of kouluien.

Outro

Brandon: Okay, that’s all for this lesson.
Nico: Thank you for joining us! See you next time! Hei hei!

17 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Do kids go to school by themselves in your country as well? 

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 05:53 AM
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Hei Lewie Hyvapoika,


Thank you for sharing your interesting story from your past! It seems that you can handle the grammar quite well! Few corrections are needed though, so, here is the corrected version.


"Kun olin nuori, mina otin (menin) busilla kouluun. Otin sen joka päivä paitsi keskiviikoisin ja lautaisin (keskiviikkoisin ja lauantaisin). Noinä (Noina) päivänä minun isani (isäni) tulisi hakemaan minut autolla..."


Despite some errors, it was easy to understand, which is the most important thing when you study any language, IMO.


Let us know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Lewie Hyvapoika
Tuesday at 11:52 PM
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Kun olin nuori, mina otin busilla kouluun. Otin sen joka päivä paitsi keskiviikoisin ja lautaisin. Noinä päivänä minun isani tulisi hakemaan minut autolla...

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:56 PM
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Hei Zuzana,


Kiitos kommentistasi! Niin, kun minä olin lapsi, menin kouluun kävellen ja jotkut bussilla. Olet oikeassa! 😄


Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Zuzana
Monday at 11:26 PM
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Hei!


Kun minä olin pieni lapsi, lapset mennivät kouluun bussilla, junalla tai kävellen. Nyt, tilanne on erilainen, lapset menevät kouluun vanhemman kanssa autolla.

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:03 PM
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HelloFelipe B.,


Thank you for your feedback. Yes, you are very much correct with your comment. The inessive form is käsineessä / käsineissä.

We will check this audio again.


Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Felipe B.
Sunday at 06:26 AM
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Hei! Kiitos oppitunnista!

When in the grammar section the podcast started showing all singular and plural case forms for "käsine", it repeated the Illative case on the Inessive case line, which is käsineessä / käsineissä (instead of käsineeseen / käsineisiin)

Anyways, hyvää työtä! Olen oppinut täällä paljon!

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:14 PM
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Hei Bálint,


Kiitos viestistäsi. ?

Kuulostaa siltä että Suomessa ja Unkarissa on melkein samanlaiset käytännöt koulumatkojen suhteen. ?


Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Bálint
Sunday at 02:43 AM
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Unkarissa lapset menevät kouluun yleensä autolla 1-4 luokassa. Sen jälkeen joko he käyttävät julkisia kuljetuspalveluja tai heidän vanhempansa vievät heidät autolla edelleen. Minä aloin mennä yksin 7. luokasta asti, mutta kun oli mahdollista, menin autolla vanhempieni kanssa. Nyt olen 12. luokassa, ja muutamia luokkatovereitani vievät aina vielä heidän vamhempansa kouluun, koska se on heille mahdollista ja lapsille mukuvampaa. Totta kai, mikä vanhemmat eivät veisi lapsiaan kouluun, kun he menevät työhön samalla matkalla!

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 09:39 PM
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Hei Naomi!


Kiitos vastauksesta, thank you for your answer! :smile:

Nice to hear children go to school by themselves elsewhere too.


Best Wishes, Parhain terveisin,

Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Naomi
Thursday at 06:34 PM
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Poykani mennä itse kouluun...