Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hello, and welcome back to FinnishPod101.com! This is Lower Beginner Season 1, lesson 20. Is Bigger Better In Finland? I’m Brandon.
Nico: Hei, minä olen Nico. Hi, I’m Nico.
Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to compare things in Finnish.
Nico: The dialogue takes place at a store. Satu is trying on some clothes and is talking about them to Petri.
Brandon: They're a couple, so they’ll be speaking standard Finnish in the casual register. Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Satu: Mitä pidät tästä mekosta?
Petri: Se lyhyempi mekko oli parempi kuin tuo.
Satu: Se oli liian kapea. Tämä on mukavampi, koska tämä on vähän leveämpi.
Petri: Ehkä siitä lyhyemmästä löytyy isompi koko.
Satu: Voinhan minä kysyä. Anteeksi, löytyykö tätä mekkoa yhtä kokoa isompana?
Brandon: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Satu: Mitä pidät tästä mekosta?
Petri: Se lyhyempi mekko oli parempi kuin tuo.
Satu: Se oli liian kapea. Tämä on mukavampi, koska tämä on vähän leveämpi.
Petri: Ehkä siitä lyhyemmästä löytyy isompi koko.
Satu: Voinhan minä kysyä. Anteeksi, löytyykö tätä mekkoa yhtä kokoa isompana?
Brandon: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Satu: Mitä pidät tästä mekosta?
: How do you like this dress?
Petri: Se lyhyempi mekko oli parempi kuin tuo.
: The shorter dress was better than that.
Satu: Se oli liian kapea. Tämä on mukavampi, koska tämä on vähän leveämpi.
: It was too narrow. This one is more comfortable, because this is a bit wider.
Petri: Ehkä siitä lyhyemmästä löytyy isompi koko.
: Maybe they have a bigger size of the shorter one.
Satu: Voinhan minä kysyä. Anteeksi, löytyykö tätä mekkoa yhtä kokoa isompana?
: Well, I can ask. Excuse me, do you have this dress in one size bigger?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: How do women dress in Finland?
Nico: A lot of women wear trousers, because they're comfortable and warmer in the winter than a skirt. But there are also many who wear skirts and dresses regularly.
Brandon: So I guess it’s similar to a lot of other Western countries then. In the previous lesson, we talked about how to dress for work. What would you say the dress code is for women?
Nico: Just like for men, suits—in this case either skirt or pant suits—are mainly expected in banks and other workplaces like that. Elsewhere, you have more choice.
Brandon: I suppose it’s better not to look like you’re just about to head to the beach! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
: mekko [natural native speed]
: dress
: mekko [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: mekko [natural native speed]
: Next:
: lyhyt [natural native speed]
: short
: lyhyt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: lyhyt [natural native speed]
: Next:
: kuin [natural native speed]
: than, as (in comparisons), like
: kuin [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: kuin [natural native speed]
: Next:
: kapea [natural native speed]
: narrow
: kapea [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: kapea [natural native speed]
: Next:
: vähän [natural native speed]
: a bit, a little, a few
: vähän [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: vähän [natural native speed]
: Next:
: leveä [natural native speed]
: wide
: leveä [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: leveä [natural native speed]
: Next:
: löytyä [natural native speed]
: to be found
: löytyä [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: löytyä [natural native speed]
: Next:
: koko [natural native speed]
: size
: koko [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: koko [natural native speed]
: Next:
: kysyä [natural native speed]
: ask
: kysyä [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: kysyä [natural native speed]
: And Last:
: iso [natural native speed]
: big
: iso [slowly - broken down by syllable]
: iso [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What’s our first word?
Nico: Mekko.
Brandon: This means “dress”. Can you use it to refer to any kind of dress?
Nico: Pretty much, yes. As long as it’s a one-piece garment and the bottom part is a skirt instead of trousers, you can use mekko. Hmm… at least almost.
Brandon: Are there exceptions?
Nico: Yes, there are some very specific kinds of formal dress that I wouldn’t call mekko, such as iltapuku - “evening dress” and hääpuku - “wedding dress”. In principle, you could call them mekko, but some might feel it’s a bit of an understatement.
Brandon: I see. Okay, what’s next?
Nico: Löytyä, which means “to be found”.
Brandon: The thing to note with this verb is it’s the person or thing that’s found that is the subject of the sentence. So you can’t use that verb to translate, “I found the book”.
Nico: No, you’d use a different verb, löytää. They are related, of course, and very similar in form, but they are still two distinct verbs.
Brandon: All right. What’s the next word?
Nico: Vähän. In the dialogue, it was translated as “a bit”, but it can also mean “some” or “a few”. In the dialoge we had Vähän leveämpi to mean “a bit wider”.
Brandon: So you don’t need to make the distinction between countable and uncountable things?
Nico: That’s right. You can say both vähän maitoa meaning “a little milk” and vähän ihmisiä meaning “few people”.
Brandon: So how come it changes from “a little” to “few”? Shouldn’t it be “a few”?
Nico: Well, actually, you’d need more context to pin down the exact meaning, because vähän can be used to mean both “few” and “a few” or “little” and “a little”.
Brandon: I see. Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to compare things.
Nico: To compare two things in Finnish, you need the comparative form of the adjective and the word kuin, which is like “than” in English.
Brandon: And how do you make the comparative form of the adjective?
Nico: You take the vowel-ending stem and attach -mpi.
Brandon: Let’s go through the adjectives we had in the dialogue. I’ll say them in English, and Nico will give the non-compared nominative form, the vowel stem, and the comparative. First we have “Short”.
Nico: The non-compared nominative is lyhyt, the vowel stem is lyhye- and the comparative is lyhyempi.
Brandon: Next is “Narrow”
Nico: The nominative is kapea, the vowel stem is also kapea-, and the comparative is kapeampi.
Brandon: Next is “Wide”
Nico: The nominative is leveä, the stem leveä-, and the comparative leveämpi.
Brandon: “Comfortable”
Nico: Mukava, mukava-, mukavampi.
Brandon: “Big”
Nico: Iso, iso-, isompi.
Brandon: “Good”
Nico: That’s an irregular one, so you’ll just have to learn it by heart. The non-compared form is hyvä, but the comparative is parempi.
Brandon: Are there any other irregular adjectives?
Nico: Well, I don’t know if these qualify as irregular, but if the adjective only has two syllables and it ends in -a or -ä, the -a or -ä turns into -e in the comparative.
Brandon: Do you have an example of that?
Nico: Sure. For example, the word for “black” is musta, but the comparative is mustempi. In the same way, kiva meaning “nice” becomes kivempi, and kylmä meaning “cold” becomes kylmempi.
Brandon: All right. Let’s make a full sentence, for example “Ville is bigger than Markku”.
Nico: That would be Ville on isompi kuin Markku. Ville on is followed by the comparative, then the word kuin, and then the person Ville is being compared with.
Brandon: I think we had some adjectives in the dialogue that were inflected.
Nico: Yes, that’s right. The comparative forms are inflected in the various cases just like with any other adjectives. In the dialogue, we had lyhyemmästä, which is the elative, and isompana, which is the essive.
Brandon: The consonant changed in the stem again.
Nico: Correct. The -mpi turns into -mma- or -mmä-, so lyhyempi becomes lyhyemmästä.
Brandon: Okay. Listeners, time to practice. How would you say “Hanna is shorter than Mari”?
[Pause]
Brandon: The answer is..
Nico: Hanna on lyhyempi kuin Mari.
Brandon: How about “Mari is older than Hanna”?
Nico: Here’s a hint. “Old” is vanha. Note that it’s a two-syllable word.
[Pause]
Brandon: The answer is..
Nico: Mari on vanhempi kuin Hanna.
Brandon: Listeners, be sure to check the lesson notes to reinforce what you’ve learned in this lesson.

Outro

Brandon: Well, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for joining us, and we’ll see you next time.
Nico: See you next time! Hei hei!

9 Comments

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FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello Listeners, try making a simple sentence in Finnish using the comparative form of an adjective!

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:52 AM
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Hello Nate,


Thank you for your funny comment. ? Keep these coming, please!


Let us know if you have any question.


Cheers,

Aarni

Team FinnishPod101.com

Nate
Saturday at 12:18 AM
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Vaimoni on 7 vuotta vanhempi kuin minä muttä minä olen pidempi :)

Corinna
Friday at 02:16 AM
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Haha, I like the word play! :laughing:

Corinna
Friday at 12:01 AM
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Hei Päivi :smile:


Ah, okay. I made that mistake in some other comments too :unamused: :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye: kiitos for the corrections! Haha, I probably should've figured out "pidempi" :unamused:


Ok, I get it! At least I was using the right word :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 04:59 PM
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Hei Corinna!


Really nice effort :thumbsup:, but let me fix a few errors with conjugations there:

"Monet ihmiset ovat pidempiä kuin minä".

"Monet ihmiset ovat", means 'many people are', so here you have to pay attention to the correct cohesive conjugation. (for example, "koirat ovat, kissat ovat" - 'dogs are, cats are', but "koira on, kissa on" - 'dog is, cat is')

Also the comparatives of adjectives can be a little bit tricky sometimes,sorry about that.. :flushed: :wink:

So for the word "pitkä", 'tall', comparative is "pidempi", and superlative is "pisin".


'People', "ihmiset" is the plural from the noun "ihminen",'person' or 'human'. "Ihmisiä" is the partitive form. For example, "torilla on paljon ihmisiä", ' there are many people at the market square'.

"Henkilö" also means 'person' or 'individual'. Plural from this is "henkilöt" and partitive plural is "henkilöitä". "Henkilö" is most often used when talking about some particular person or a group of person, without referring to their name. It's also often used in official documents and such. For example "henkilöpaperit" means 'identification papers'.


And you're right! "koko" does mean 'all' and 'entire', but it also means 'size'.

Do you know this old Finnish wordplay?:

"Kokoo kokoon koko kokko! Koko kokkoko? Koko kokko."

Does it make any sense to you? :wink:


Best Wishes,

Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Corinna
Wednesday at 01:41 PM
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"Monta ihmisiä on pitkämpi kuin minut" ("Many people are taller than me")


I thought "koko" meant "all" or "entire" But I guess it's another word that depends on context, eh? :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


Also, when I was looking up the word for "people" there was another word, "henkilöä." What's the difference?

FinnishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:35 PM
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Hi Elena!


Thank you for a good question!

In spoken language, actually, you can quite often hear people say also "Huomenna on lämpimämpi kuin tänään.", but it's not totally grammatically correct.


The form "..on lämpimämpi" refers to something/someone being warmer, therefore you need a subject - the 'something/someone' that is warmer here. The word 'huomenna' is a measure of time. If you want to use the form 'lämpimämpi' you should therefore use the nouns for the words 'tomorrow', which is "huominen" and for 'today', which is "tämä päivä". -->> "Huominen on lämpimämpi kuin tämä päivä." ("tomorrow ('the day tomorrow') is warmer than today ('than this day').")

I know it can be a little bit complicated and confusing at sometimes, but I hope this helps you a little bit?

As I mentioned before, Finns aren't that strict with the grammar in the spoken language, so don't worry about it too much. :wink:


Päivi

Team FinnishPod101.com

Elena
Monday at 11:33 PM
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1. Huomenna on lämpimämpää kuin tänään.


Miksi en voi sanoa " Huomenna on lämpimä-mpi kuin tänään" . Vastaa englaniksi, kiitos